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Future of Media Commission... public consultation timed to attract no attention

  • 15-12-2020 4:07pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 2,987 ✭✭✭ haphaphap


    The public consultation period is from 30th November until 8th January.

    I've been mailing the Government complaining about the proposed broadcasting charge.
    I received a response today which mentioned that the Future of Media Commission will brief Government

    You have only three weeks left to express your views. They couldn't have timed it better to avoid the attention of the public.

    There is no natural fairness in an obligatory charge for a service which you don't consume by depicting it as something which is in the public interest.
    RTE is a toxic organisation which can't be reformed and should no longer enjoy the protection of Government.

    If you have an opinion then let it be known by making a submission.
    visit https://futureofmediacommission.ie/

    Reply from Minister:

    Dear XXXXXXXXX,
    I refer to your recent correspondence to the Tánaiste on Dec 6 which was forwarded to
    Minister Catherine Martin regarding the introduction of a household media charge.
    The broadcasting environment has changed dramatically in the last number of
    years. Falling advertising revenues and increased competition between broadcasting, on
    demand services and other online content has impacted heavily with serious
    consequences for all Irish broadcasters. Irish audiences want local Irish content ranging
    from reliable news and current affairs to drama, sports, culture and entertainment and
    reform of the funding model to take account of technological advances is necessary in
    order to provide sustainable funding for the longer term. This is in line with international
    trends across the EU where most Member States have recognised the importance of
    continuing to fund public service broadcasting and have sought to reform and futureproof their funding models.
    On 29 September 2020 the Government agreed the terms of reference and membership
    of the Future of Media Commission. The Commission is chaired by Professor Brian
    MacCraith, former President of Dublin City University, and also include experts in public
    service media, independent journalism, social media, new technology platforms, media
    economics, culture, language, creative content, governance and international best
    practice.
    The new Programme for Government, Our Shared Future, expanded the remit of the
    Public Service Broadcasting Commission to become the Future of Media Commission,
    tasked with considering the future of print, broadcast, and online media in a platform
    agnostic fashion. On Monday 30th November the Commission launched their Public
    Consultation. They are inviting submissions until 8th January 2021 and I would encourage
    you to input into that process at https://futureofmediacommission.ie/.

    Minister Martin looks forward to the report from the Commission on the Future of Media
    and to working with all stakeholders towards building a sustainable funding model for
    public service broadcasting and public service content providers.
    I hope this information is beneficial.
    Yours sincerely,
    ____________
    XXXXXXXX
    Private Secretary


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Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,105 ✭✭✭ Kivaro


    And the 4 mechanisms to let your views be known are here:
    https://futureofmediacommission.ie/public-consultation/
    But the online form on that link is very handy for submissions.

    Edit: It really just takes a minute or two to fill out the form, and while there are a number of questions asked, you can just submit your disagreement with the household media charge if you wish.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,938 ✭✭✭ Stovepipe


    Done.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,105 ✭✭✭ Kivaro


    Let's not forget that Fianna Fáil leader Micheál Martin pledged back in 2019 to bring in this new household charge for the bottomless money pit that is RTE, and wants Revenue to collect it. This charge may also go out to a lucrative tender.
    So even if you do not have a television, just by owning a "device" will catch you in the net of this household charge. Wonder will it hit people with older flip-phones? If it has access to the Internet, then it will.

    If you do not want another household charge on top of the other bills that you currently pay, then let them know. Otherwise they may claim that due to such little negative feedback on this charge, that the majority of the country wants it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 267 ✭✭ Marcos


    Done, and I'm bumping this up to the top. If you don't want the government to charge you a license fee (or a household charge) for accessing the internet then fill out the form. It only takes a couple of minutes. At least the media commission won't be able to lie and say that most people agree with the charge, if the majority fill out the form telling them they don't want it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,299 ✭✭✭ Snotty


    They've purposely made the online form more complicated than it needs to be, some multi selects and open text sections to elaborate would have been better.


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  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 58,881 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Wibbs


    Done.
    Snotty wrote: »
    They've purposely made the online form more complicated than it needs to be, some multi selects and open text sections to elaborate would have been better.

    Of course they have. This is almost certainly a done deal. We will be paying this bogus tax to prop up ailing entities like RTE, entities that have become less and less fit for purpose over time. They need to be massively downsized and restructured. If RTE were a state body that ran as a commission only organisation that tendered for commercially viable output then I'd have less of an objection. Better yet if it was a subscription service that one could opt out of. Of course the RTE crowd won't want that as it would highlight how much of their current output is unwatchable crap.

    But like I say guys, this is 100% a done deal. The "public consultation" is merely a box ticking exercise to make it look like we've been asked. Just like the hate speech legislation.

    Rejoice in the awareness of feeling stupid, for that’s how you end up learning new things. If you’re not aware you’re stupid, you probably are.



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,105 ✭✭✭ Kivaro


    Snotty wrote: »
    They've purposely made the online form more complicated than it needs to be, some multi selects and open text sections to elaborate would have been better.
    Yes, they have indeed; almost deliberately one might think. All of that stuff can be ignored if one wishes, and only the objection to the the new media/household charge can be submitted.
    By the way, they will try to convince us AFTER implementation of this household charge that the new tax is not actually a household charge. They will create another name for obfuscation purposes.

    At the very least, we can request an FOI on the details of this public consultation e.g. how many people actually objected to the new charge.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,987 ✭✭✭ haphaphap


    Kivaro wrote: »
    At the very least, we can request an FOI on the details of this public consultation e.g. how many people actually objected to the new charge.
    It'll be astroturfed so that the volume of dissenters is less than the volume of sock-puppets/vested interests in favour.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,105 ✭✭✭ Kivaro


    haphaphap wrote: »
    It'll be astroturfed so that the volume of dissenters is less than the volume of sock-puppets/vested interests in favour.

    How many staff in RTE currently?
    We might not be able to compete with the unlimited resources that they have.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,105 ✭✭✭ Kivaro


    Not sure if anybody else received an email from the commission recently if you submitted input on their web site about a "glitch" in their online submissions, specifically around the question of funding for this new household tax to support the likes of RTE. Isn't that convenient :pac:

    Here is what I received:
    You recently made a submission to the Future of Media Commission public
    consultation process. It has come to our attention that a technical
    glitch in our online submission facility caused your submission to be
    prematurely cut-off. You had the opportunity to answer only Question 1
    (How should Government develop and support the concept and role of
    public service media and what should its role in relation to public
    service content in the wider media be?). There were two other questions
    which you may also have wished to answer:

    Question 2 reads: How should public service media be financed
    sustainably?
    Question 3 reads: How should media be governed and regulated?

    They provide you with a link to try again to submit your disapproval of the new RTE tax.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,481 ✭✭✭ ahnowbrowncow


    Commenting to bump this and to remind me to fill out form later.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,623 ✭✭✭ GarIT


    I submitted my response. Mostly focusing on getting RTE staff and presenters onto the civil service pay scale. And encouraging RTE presenters to move on if they want more money. Improving RTE player converting it into more of a streaming service, dropping public funded entertainment content. Dropping the TV licence.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,987 ✭✭✭ haphaphap


    You are playing in to their hands by giving them a reason to legitimise themselves and argue they are public servants when the whole organisation is self-serving.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,675 ✭✭✭ Pa ElGrande


    When you fill in the form as a private individual you will be asked for your name, email and whether you wnt your name published and what organiation you represent. The following questions are the asked.

    You will now be asked three separate questions, as follows:

    Question 1. How should Government develop and support the concept and role of public service media and what should its role in relation to public service content in the wider media be?

    Question 2. How should public service media be financed sustainably?

    Question 3. How should media be governed and regulated?


    Question 1
    How should Government develop and support the concept and role of public service media and what should its role in relation to public service content in the wider media be?

    Q: How should Government develop and support the concept and role of public service media and what should its role in relation to public service content in the wider media be?

    Q: What can be learned from the evolution of public service media over the last decade?

    Q: What systems may be required to support and sustain public service content, e.g. high quality, independent journalism, in an increasingly competitive and consolidated market?

    Q: How might public service media be more effective in promoting the Irish language, sport and culture?
    How might public service media better respond to the needs and expectations of the public?

    Q: What can we learn from other jurisdictions?


    Question 2.
    How should public service media be financed sustainably?

    Q: What is the best model for future funding of public service media in Ireland? What approach best supports independent editorial oversight while achieving value for money and delivering on public service aims?

    Q: What opportunities exist to develop and implement business model and organisational changes within the public service broadcasters (RTÉ and TG4)?

    Q: How might content commissioning, including by RTÉ, TG4 and the BAI Sound and Vision scheme, be adjusted/improved/reformed to better achieve public service aims?

    Q: How should public funding or tax reliefs be apportioned to Public Service Content providers?

    Q: What does the shift in advertising revenues towards big tech firms mean for the future of print, online and broadcast media?

    Q: What role is there for alternative funding models for Public Service Content providers – voluntary, cooperative, crowdsourcing, subscription?


    Question 3.
    How should media be governed and regulated?

    Q: What regulatory changes at EU or global level might impact on the governance of public service media in the period ahead?

    Q: What challenges are posed to a vibrant, independent public service media by increasing consolidation / declining plurality of ownership in the Irish market?

    Q: Are current legislative and regulatory controls for public service media adequate?


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,744 ✭✭✭✭ astrofool


    RTE is still funding 2 orchestra, and in the most Irish way possible, after an enquiry, the recommendation was that it was too expensive to run 2 orchestra, but we should keep running 2 orchestras (or that the government start running one of the orchestra directly for some reason...).
    https://www.thejournal.ie/rte-orchestras-review-3974047-Apr2018/

    I guess getting people from the BBC to run an enquiry into another public body wasn't the brightest idea.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,305 ✭✭✭✭ jimmycrackcorm


    Wibbs wrote: »
    Done.



    Of course they have. This is almost certainly a done deal. We will be paying this bogus tax to prop up ailing entities like RTE, entities that have become less and less fit for purpose over time. They need to be massively downsized and restructured. If RTE were a state body that ran as a commission only organisation that tendered for commercially viable output then I'd have less of an objection. Better yet if it was a subscription service that one could opt out of. Of course the RTE crowd won't want that as it would highlight how much of their current output is unwatchable crap.

    But like I say guys, this is 100% a done deal. The "public consultation" is merely a box ticking exercise to make it look like we've been asked. Just like the hate speech legislation.

    And yet everyone who complains about RTE seems to have been watching the toy show. I believe a public service broadcaster is an absolute necessity as I wouldn't like Ireland to go down the US route of Fox / CNN bias. And this means being paid by public money.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 58,881 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Wibbs


    And yet everyone who complains about RTE seems to have been watching the toy show.
    Not me anyway. Got rid of my telly a few years ago and haven't paid the RTE tax since. The only time I might listen to the radio is in the car and none of my presets are tuned into RTE and I can't remember the last time I darkened the door of their website. I practice what I preach on this score.
    I believe a public service broadcaster is an absolute necessity as I wouldn't like Ireland to go down the US route of Fox / CNN bias. And this means being paid by public money.
    For a start many would contend RTE is already biased towards the government de jour and their own survival. The larger problem is the overpriced bloat in RTE and a completely changed landscape in media that they haven't kept up with. Even when they try last time I looked their streaming "service" was a joke. The bloat is the larger problem and one they have always been reluctant to tackle. TG4 runs on a tiny budget and provides a good service for it. I would have no issue paying a fee for a streamlined service that provided quality content, but that's not RTE and hasn't been for donkey's. Their best stuff is all commissioned externally.

    Rejoice in the awareness of feeling stupid, for that’s how you end up learning new things. If you’re not aware you’re stupid, you probably are.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,675 ✭✭✭ Pa ElGrande


    And yet everyone who complains about RTE seems to have been watching the toy show. I believe a public service broadcaster is an absolute necessity as I wouldn't like Ireland to go down the US route of Fox / CNN bias. And this means being paid by public money.

    The Toy show is a commercial presentation and presumably the biggest single gross margin event in RTEs calendar when accounting for cost of production, sponsors and advertising revenue. All media organisations have a bias that reflects their consumers preference, in the US there are also is NPR and PBS which are regarded as left of center public service broadcasters. I stopped consuming RTE over a decade ago, have no television or radio and based on a conversation with my Dad they are horse whipping repeats to death, which sounds a bit like that station Dave TV that recycles Top Gear and other old programs.

    My objection to RTE is not the content. I left them long ago and traded in my TV as part of the divorce settlement, now they're a bitter ex-spouse sending out solictors letters threatening me with a court order to compel me to give up my time and labour to support them in the lifestyle they are accustomed to.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,641 ✭✭✭✭ Elmo


    astrofool wrote: »
    RTE is still funding 2 orchestra, and in the most Irish way possible, after an enquiry, the recommendation was that it was too expensive to run 2 orchestra, but we should keep running 2 orchestras (or that the government start running one of the orchestra directly for some reason...).
    https://www.thejournal.ie/rte-orchestras-review-3974047-Apr2018/

    I guess getting people from the BBC to run an enquiry into another public body wasn't the brightest idea.

    The NSO moved to the NCH at the beginning of this year. Many of the PSB in Europe also have orchestras. RTÉ CO currently remains with RTÉ.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,641 ✭✭✭✭ Elmo


    My objection to RTE is not the content

    My issue is the content. Repeats, taking a break for the news (a break from 22 Dec to 11 Jan, and a break from Mid July to Sept), reduced amount of funding to children's TV when they promised they would not cut it, reducing their commitment to Drama to 2.2m in 2019. They waste their money.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,105 ✭✭✭ Kivaro


    The first stage of this process is complete. According to an email that I received: "over 750 submissions from the public and other stakeholders have been received."

    The next phase of public consultation is a series of "online Thematic Dialogues", as they call it, and will begin in 6 days (Jan 28).
    From the email: "Each dialogue will be a 2-hour event, involving three panel discussions, with invited panellists making presentations on the theme, followed by a 20-minute question and answer dialogue with the Commission and attendees."


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,987 ✭✭✭ haphaphap


    I received the same mail.
    It is a complete sham with the discussion being steered toward a desired outcome.
    Someone will say it would be in the public interest to do x, y or z.
    RTE will say they can provide X, Y or Z which will of course be hosted by the usual suspects and produced using the same unionized work-shy staff to the same low standards and the question of whether people in general actually want this dross won't be considered.
    Funding model is changed from a licence fee for those who want to consume the product RTE produce to a universal charge because it is "public interest programming".

    Their tactics are obvious. It is disgusting. This is all being facilitated by the Department of Communications, Catherine Martin, Eamon Ryan and Michael Martin as they want a nice docile obedient Pravda at their disposal.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,641 ✭✭✭✭ Elmo


    haphaphap wrote: »
    I received the same mail.
    It is a complete sham with the discussion being steered toward a desired outcome.
    Someone will say it would be in the public interest to do x, y or z.
    RTE will say they can provide X, Y or Z which will of course be hosted by the usual suspects and produced using the same unionized work-shy staff to the same low standards and the question of whether people in general actually want this dross won't be considered.
    Funding model is changed from a licence fee for those who want to consume the product RTE produce to a universal charge because it is "public interest programming".

    Their tactics are obvious. It is disgusting. This is all being facilitated by the Department of Communications, Catherine Martin, Eamon Ryan and Michael Martin as they want a nice docile obedient Pravda at their disposal.

    Dept of Media & Arts nothing to do with Communications.

    But yes I agree, did not rceive the email !

    Surprised by the 750 figure


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,641 ✭✭✭✭ Elmo


    Programme

    16:30 Introductions. Prof. Brian MacCraith, Chair, Future of Media Commission

    16:35 Panel 1

    European Broadcasting Union – Noel Curran
    Paul Farrell, Virgin Media TV
    Amanda Ade, the 'Black and Irish Podcast'
    Questions and Answers with Panel 1

    17:15 Panel 2

    John Purcell, Independent Broadcasters of Ireland
    Alan Esslemont, TG4
    Conn McCarrick , National Youth Council of Ireland
    Questions and Answers with Panel 2

    17:55 Panel 3

    Susan Kirby, Screen Producers Ireland
    Kevin Doyle, Newsbrands
    Daráine Mulvihill
    Questions and Answers with Panel 3

    18:35 Conclusion


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,641 ✭✭✭✭ Elmo


    Well I lasted an hour and left. I will comeback to it at some point.

    It's always the kids interested in politics and that speak for youth, they're like 15 year old's turning 50 and even 50 year olds are more hip.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,641 ✭✭✭✭ Elmo


    So second public webinar takes place on Thursday, did anyone get an email telling them it was taking place?

    Bit of a joke really.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 58,881 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Wibbs


    It's entirely for the optics, as Irish governmental public "discussions" almost always are. The decision has already been made. I'd bet the farm on that.

    Rejoice in the awareness of feeling stupid, for that’s how you end up learning new things. If you’re not aware you’re stupid, you probably are.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,987 ✭✭✭ haphaphap


    got one for the first but not the second.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 528 ✭✭✭ Invidious


    Kivaro wrote: »
    The first stage of this process is complete. According to an email that I received: "over 750 submissions from the public and other stakeholders have been received."

    You can read submissions from these "stakeholders" online.

    All the usual suspects are here -- all lobbying vigorously for their own interests, but I've read nobody lobbying for the interests of the taxpayer, saying that we should not have to pay a so-called broadcasting charge for services that we don't need and don't want.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 23,641 ✭✭✭✭ Elmo


    It should be renamed The Future Of News Media Commission. It has no interest in any content outside of News and Current Affairs.


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