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e-scooter regulations due before Christmas

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,529 ✭✭✭ Skill Magill


    No insurance either I would assume, with no licence or reg it couldn't be inforced


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,687 ✭✭✭✭ Samuel T. Cogley


    Heard a figure of 900 of them confiscated. I know for a fact they are, on occasion, confiscated but I had no idea they had lifted so many.


  • Registered Users Posts: 586 ✭✭✭ NBar


    Anything with Eamon Ryan's name to it will end in tears in a few years time when everyone has scooters and they need revenue


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,875 ✭✭✭ zg3409


    No insurance either I would assume, with no licence or reg it couldn't be inforced

    Radio reporter this morning rang car insurer who said they did not offer any insurance for e-scooters, and reporter followed up that none was available in Ireland by any broker.

    I saw a guy heading up a town main street, on the road on an electric skateboard, no handlebars, hopefully these won't be legal modes of commuting.

    The problem is they can't enforce the rules of the road if no licence, no registration so 'riders' are free as in cowboys. They should have legalised them a year ago and brought in confiscitation for any minor rule break. A person interviewed on the radio said a friend had it confiscated by Gardai and had to pay 350 euro to get it back from the piubd the same as a car, and some received car penalty points on court appearance.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,593 ✭✭✭✭ ted1


    No insurance either I would assume, with no licence or reg it couldn't be inforced

    Why would you think that they need insurance?

    Motor insurance is required due to the number of claims but More importantly the value of claims are beyond the men’s of most drivers.

    Rear ending a car at lights at 10kmh can do several thousands worth of damage. + a couple of thousand for each occupant through Injury claims and loss of earnings etc.
    A 15kg scooter is very different than a 1500kg car


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  • Posts: 17,733 ✭✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    zg3409 wrote: »
    ................

    The problem is they can't enforce the rules of the road if no licence, no registration so 'riders' are free as in cowboys.................

    Rules of road are occasionally enforced wrt cyclists surely?


  • Registered Users Posts: 68,333 ✭✭✭✭ seamus


    Fingers crossed as this looks like good news...

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/eamon-ryan-opens-road-to-e-scooters-by-christmas-rxr5drnbc

    Scooters will be:
    banned from footpaths ✅
    Limited to 25kph under law ✅
    No driving licence required ✅
    This would be good.

    I would like to see a wide campaign from the RSA saying something like,

    "E-scooters are now legal to use on Irish roads. They are a safe, comfortable and eco-friendly way of travelling short distances.
    While using an e-scooter, you must obey the rules of the road, just like a bicycle. This means;

    - You must not ride on a footpath under any circumstances.
    - You must always obey traffic signals, Gardai and Traffic Wardens
    - When turning onto a road, you must signal appropriately and wait for the way to be clear before proceeding.
    - You must never ride in a way that causes danger to yourself or other road users or pedestrians.

    Failure to obey the rules of the road will result in an on-the-spot fine or a court appearance."

    Everywhere, all the time.

    Of course, what will actually happen is that they'll fanfare the fact that e-scooters are legal, say nothing about how to use them, and two weeks later you'll have people blasting through parks and pedestrian streets on them "because they're legal".


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,593 ✭✭✭✭ ted1


    seamus wrote: »
    This would be good.

    I would like to see a wide campaign from the RSA saying something like,

    "E-scooters are now legal to use on Irish roads. They are a safe, comfortable and eco-friendly way of travelling short distances.
    While using an e-scooter, you must obey the rules of the road, just like a bicycle. This means;

    - You must not ride on a footpath under any circumstances.
    - You must always obey traffic signals, Gardai and Traffic Wardens
    - When turning onto a road, you must signal appropriately and wait for the way to be clear before proceeding.
    -.

    That would be incorrect. Cyclists are not banned from footpaths, because the road can be a danger place for 3 year olds.
    Also I don’t believe you need to signal. In many instances it can be dangerous to remove your hands from the bar.

    Also speed limits don’t apply for cyclists.

    So they are not the same.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,153 ✭✭✭ Orebro


    zg3409 wrote: »

    I saw a guy heading up a town main street, on the road on an electric skateboard, no handkebars, hopefully these won't be legal modes of commuting.

    I personally know someone who drives a Range Rover who drives up the main street, and from experience the guy shouldn't be allowed drive a nail. I know who I'd prefer to be sharing the road with. Not sure why people are so scared of e-scooters when you're sharing the road with all the other psychos driving 2.5 tonne vehicles!


  • Registered Users Posts: 4 !!!!


    seamus wrote: »
    This would be good.

    I would like to see a wide campaign from the RSA saying something like,

    "E-scooters are now legal to use on Irish roads. They are a safe, comfortable and eco-friendly way of travelling short distances.
    While using an e-scooter, you must obey the rules of the road, just like a bicycle. This means;

    - You must not ride on a footpath under any circumstances.
    - You must always obey traffic signals, Gardai and Traffic Wardens
    - When turning onto a road, you must signal appropriately and wait for the way to be clear before proceeding.
    - You must never ride in a way that causes danger to yourself or other road users or pedestrians.

    Failure to obey the rules of the road will result in an on-the-spot fine or a court appearance."

    Everywhere, all the time.

    Of course, what will actually happen is that they'll fanfare the fact that e-scooters are legal, say nothing about how to use them, and two weeks later you'll have people blasting through parks and pedestrian streets on them "because they're legal".

    Would be great is they extended this campaign to all road users!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 10,919 ✭✭✭✭ Calahonda52


    ted1 wrote: »
    That would be incorrect. Cyclists are not banned from footpaths, because the road can be a danger place for 3 year olds.
    Also I don’t believe you need to signal. In many instances it can be dangerous to remove your hands from the bar.

    Also speed limits don’t apply for cyclists.

    So they are not the same.

    the speed issue applies to e bikes, which are mech propelled, as are these scooters.

    Re the path, you need to bone up on the law here before making such statement
    https://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/travel_and_recreation/cycling/cycling_offences.html

    Is it legal to cycle on a footpath?
    Since 2015 the laws governing cycling have been regulated into specific fixed charge offences. Gardaí have the power to stop and fine a cyclist if they commit a fixed charge offence. Cycling on a footpath is not a fixed charge offence. However other laws do include it as an offence.

    Article 11 of the Road Traffic (Traffic and Parking) (Amendment) (No. 2) Regulations 2012 prohibits you from cycling beyond a traffic sign that prohibits bicycles
    Article 13 of the 1997 Regulations makes it an offence to cycle on a footpath unless you are entering or exiting a property
    Article 45 of the 1997 Regulations (as amended by the Road Traffic (Traffic and Parking) (Amendment) Regulations 1998), you must not cycle in a pedestrianised street or area during the period indicated by the sign
    Although it is not a fixed charge offence to cycle on a footpath a cyclist could be fined for doing so if a Garda deemed their cycling to be without ’reasonable consideration‘.

    Roads are dangerous places, period.
    Danger, like covid, is not age sensitive


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,593 ✭✭✭✭ ted1



    Roads are dangerous places, period.
    Danger, like covid, is not age sensitive


    That’s a funny sentence as the dangers of Covid are very age related. The average death is something like 84.

    Just like the dangers of cycling on a Road are much higher for a child.


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