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Opinions on E-Bikes...

  • 17-09-2020 8:36pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 837 ✭✭✭ Sandor Clegane


    I was considering getting an e bike and was just wondering what kind of assistance do you get off them?

    Is it worth getting into? I honestly haven'd ridden any bike in years and am quite unfit, will they offer enough assistance to an out of shape guy?

    I live in a small enough town and just looking for something to take me from A to B with killing me.


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Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,075 ✭✭✭ IamtheWalrus


    I was considering getting an e bike and was just wondering what kind of assistance do you get off them?

    Is it worth getting into? I honestly haven'd ridden any bike in years and am quite unfit, will they offer enough assistance to an out of shape guy?

    I live in a small enough town and just looking for something to take me from A to B with killing me.

    They give you assistance up to I think 15km/h then the motor cuts out. If you’re hoping the electric is a replacement for man/woman power, you’d be wrong tbh. I have ordered one. Can you go for a test run at a bike shop?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,415 ✭✭✭ fat bloke


    They're brilliant and going by your post, exactly what you want because it's exactly what they're designed for. Go for it, you'll absolutely love it. Any shop selling them will give you a test ride and 15 seconds in the saddle will answer more questions than a month on boards :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,170 ✭✭✭ Breezer


    fat bloke wrote: »
    They're brilliant and going by your post, exactly what you want because it's exactly what they're designed for. Go for it, you'll absolutely love it. Any shop selling them will give you a test ride and 15 seconds in the saddle will answer more questions than a month on boards :)

    I’ve a friend who absolutely refuses to go anywhere on a bike, but we got him cycling the Western Greenway in both directions a few weeks ago on an e-bike and he loved it. I’d say you’ll love it. Just be aware they’re heavy when the motor runs out!


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,967 ✭✭✭ SafeSurfer


    I bought an ebike 9 years ago. It was a Stork Raadar. It was difficult to ride without assistance.
    Last year I bought a Cube Touring Pro electric bike and I would highly recommend it. It can be cycled Just like an ordinary Bike without assistance which is high I use it 95% of the time.
    When needed the assistance has 4 settings, Eco, Tour, Sport and Turbo, representing 25, 50, 75 and 100% assistance respectively. It has the effect of flattening hills.

    For someone getting started back into cycling it is ideal. You will still get exercise and become fitter but can get a helping hand when needed.
    Electric bikes are heavier than non electric bikes and are expensive. However you will probably end up riding an ebike more than a pushbike and so will use it more often. You will get fitter faster on an ebike that you do use than a push bike you don’t.
    I think it is best to buy a reputable long established brand of bike and I would highly recommend Cube

    Multo autem ad rem magis pertinet quallis tibi vide aris quam allis



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,801 ✭✭✭ Duckjob


    After not being on a bike for years, I bought an eBike in 2014 to manage a longer commute to work. With some decent rain gear, I could do this trip 5 days a week in all weathers (major advantage of eBike is on wet days, you can relax and let the motor do more of the work and so you don't boil up in your rain gear). As result I lost weight and gained enough fitness that within another year I was ready to buy a road bike.

    I still use both today - I love my road bike for more intense workout rides, but for sheer utility to get from A to B without hassle I love my eBike.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 13,235 ✭✭✭✭ loyatemu


    They give you assistance up to I think 15km/h then the motor cuts out.

    it's 25km/h that they have to cut out at to be legal.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,773 ✭✭✭ duffman13


    Would thoroughly recommend it. I got one and it's amazing, cycled to work every day since, having started off not being on a bike in years. It'll assist up to 25kph but you can choose your assistance level on most bikes. On most days I tip along at 30/35kph but on a windy/rainy day or tackling a hill its amazing!


  • Registered Users Posts: 369 ✭✭ kingoffifa


    don't own one. used ti love seeing them on the commute because I could tuck in behind them, while also working up a sweat trying to catch up when they take off!
    my two experiences of cycling them, brought nothing except smiles.
    do a decent bit of research on the motors, I think there's been some advances lately.


  • Registered Users Posts: 911 ✭✭✭ sharingan


    My partners mum owns a good one (will check brand) and I tend to take it out a lot when I visit.

    I am a pretty good cyclist and fit for all road conditions, but the assistance of an e-bike is very valuable when you are doing A-B cycles. They demolish hills. Now that I take the little kids around in the trailer a lot, and we now live in the north of cork city, we are getting sorely tempted to pick up one for ourselves, as it would let me take the kids anywhere.

    You will find that your fitness will pick up so that you will routinely cycle without the power assist, and then it will kick in when you hit hills or bad surfaces


  • Registered Users Posts: 98 ✭✭ Quick


    Rented a Giant E mountain bike last year in alpe d'huez. It was amazing apart from any runs that had a ski lift used it to get to a few that were only accessible by gravel road. Going uphill at 18kmh with little effort on a bike that weighed a tonne was easy. Was on it for about 4 hours and battery was @ 60% when I dropped it back.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,477 ✭✭✭ irishgrover


    I am overweight, and have significant issues with back and asthma. I find it very difficult to exercise without triggering an asthma attack or causing significant pain to knee or back.
    I bought a cube nature one ebike a couple of weeks ago and am doing -25-30km most days.
    What i personally find brilliant is how good it is at assisting me in exercising. I dont care how fast or far I go. All I was is to get my heart beating at 120-140 bpm for 60-90 minutes. This bike is perfect for that.
    What has surprised my is the amount to of time I spend > 25kpm.
    Overall I'm amazed that an ebike is such a great tool for controlling bpm/effort.
    Its early days but my expectations have been exceeded


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,711 ✭✭✭✭ Richard Hillman


    You'll be grand in terms of fitness, I have elderly people overtake me going up a hill I live near. Although don't expect to get much love from regular cyclists when you're overtaking on a hill and you zoom past with minimum effort whilst they are dogging it out :pac:

    Make sure you have a good place to lock it though. They are very sought after by bike thieves.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,801 ✭✭✭ Duckjob


    You'll be grand in terms of fitness, I have elderly people overtake me going up a hill I live near. Although don't expect to get much love from regular cyclists when you're overtaking on a hill and you zoom past with minimum effort whilst they are dogging it out :pac:

    Anyone who isn't a take-it-all-ultra-seriously knob will recognise that every single extra bike on the road is making cycling easier and safer for every single person , whether it's a road bike, eBike, mountain bike, cargo, etc etc

    Personally one of my favorite things when I go to countries like Netherlands is seeing all the elderly folk out breezing around on their eBikes.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,432 ✭✭✭✭ josip


    (Hopefully not to old a thread to post in)

    It looks to me like the battery pack for this E-bike was just a bank of double As.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-56457294

    Are most E-bike batteries constructed like this or do some of them have more customised designs?


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,235 ✭✭✭✭ loyatemu


    josip wrote: »
    (Hopefully not to old a thread to post in)

    It looks to me like the battery pack for this E-bike was just a bank of double As.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-56457294

    Are most E-bike batteries constructed like this or do some of them have more customised designs?

    I think most large batteries are just an array of smaller cells connected in series inside. Not necessarily AAs.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,635 ✭✭✭✭ listermint


    josip wrote: »
    (Hopefully not to old a thread to post in)

    It looks to me like the battery pack for this E-bike was just a bank of double As.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-56457294

    Are most E-bike batteries constructed like this or do some of them have more customised designs?

    The article states nothing of the sort. It does however state to charge with only the manufacturer charger.

    Most ebikes are battery packs are constructed using Samsung or other manufacturers like the 18650 cell units put together in a configuration to suit the style of pack fitment. no different to EV vehicles or other battery devices even say a cordless dyson for example.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,432 ✭✭✭✭ josip


    listermint wrote: »
    The article states nothing of the sort. It does however state to charge with only the manufacturer charger.

    Most ebikes are battery packs are constructed using Samsung or other manufacturers like the 18650 cell units put together in a configuration to suit the style of pack fitment. no different to EV vehicles or other battery devices even say a cordless dyson for example.

    My question was based on the photo, not on the text of the article.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,477 ✭✭✭ irishgrover


    josip wrote: »
    (Hopefully not to old a thread to post in)

    It looks to me like the battery pack for this E-bike was just a bank of double As.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-56457294

    Are most E-bike batteries constructed like this or do some of them have more customised designs?


    ultimately most batteries, including EV cars have the same set up except on a larger scale, with added battery management systems, coolant etc.
    but ultimately if you look inside a Tesla you will see something similar


  • Moderators, Politics Moderators Posts: 32,817 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Seth Brundle




  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 42,365 Mod ✭✭✭✭ magicbastarder


    is that claim accurate though? is a throttle allowing 6km/h mentioned in the regs for pedelecs, because i have not heard this before?

    yes, it's stupidly petty if the gardai are pulling people over for this, but i'm sceptical that that is strictly legal.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 13,235 ✭✭✭✭ loyatemu


    considering the number of people whizzing about on eScooters that the guards don't pay any attention to, I can only assume he did something to draw attention to himself.

    nonetheless, stupid regulation, hopefully the new legislation accounts for this feature; otherwise we'll have a farcical situation where you can ride a scooter with a throttle but not a bike.

    Rules should be:
    Electric; <25km/h; single person; (maybe some weight limit) = legal


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,852 ✭✭✭ DaveyDave


    My Canyon has a walk mode. Press a certain button combination to activate and it will go up to 6kph. If you were on the bike you could push with your foot and trick it but otherwise still not a throttle.

    Those folding ebikes that all the teenagers have seem to be scooter like in the sense that you push off once and the motor does the rest. They'd want to tackle them first before going after bikes. Or people with 1,000w motors doing 60kph.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 15,353 Mod ✭✭✭✭ smacl


    What are people's feelings on lower end e-bikes? My daughter is looking for one for the run into school and evening dance classes this Autumn, but no idea if she'll stick with it. She's not into cycling, purely looking for a simple, economic, reasonably robust form of transport for ~20-30k a day, 5 days a week. Thinking of a Carrera crossfire e-bike at €1679 but open to suggestions.


  • Registered Users Posts: 270 ✭✭ Kander


    smacl wrote: »
    What are people's feelings on lower end e-bikes? My daughter is looking for one for the run into school and evening dance classes this Autumn, but no idea if she'll stick with it. She's not into cycling, purely looking for a simple, economic, reasonably robust form of transport for ~20-30k a day, 5 days a week. Thinking of a Carrera crossfire e-bike at €1679 but open to suggestions.

    You might be better off with this option from Decathlon: https://www.decathlon.ie/long-distance-urban-cycling/100398-81715-elops-900-e-low-frame-electric-town-bike-blue.html#/demodelsize-200sslashm/demodelcolor-8605297?queryID=1941c8d4ce24547703f0dd6c75225b92&objectID=4152130

    Compared to the halfords options you'll get a bike with:
    • The same battery capacity
    • Cheaper
    • Mudguards
    • Pannier rack
    • Better built* Subjective only

    It would be easier to sell on arguably if your daughter doesn't use it once her school & classes finish up.


  • Registered Users Posts: 712 ✭✭✭ devonp


    saw 2 of these y'day....whata think ?


    https://www.hepcat.se/brands/michael-blast-ebike/michael-blast-ebike-greaser-electric-bike-greenblack?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI2Oucz8Wt8QIVDYFQBh3gLgW2EAYYAyABEgLp3vD_BwE


    or possibly this one


    https://electrek.co/2018/05/08/wwii-inspired-electric-bicycle-36-mph/

    equipped with nice leather paniers/bags at the back too


    they were certainly flyin' along the rathmines to Rathgar rd cycle lane


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 15,353 Mod ✭✭✭✭ smacl


    devonp wrote: »

    Very pretty, but a 50k range and 28kg weight to shift if you go batteries low would be a problem. 35kph max also means you'd need to license and insure it like a moped.
    or possibly this one


    https://electrek.co/2018/05/08/wwii-inspired-electric-bicycle-36-mph/

    equipped with nice leather paniers/bags at the back too


    they were certainly flyin' along the rathmines to Rathgar rd cycle lane

    Looks like great gas, but also legally a moped AFAIK for license and insurance purposes given max speed. Can't be more than 25kph max here to escape this.


  • Registered Users Posts: 712 ✭✭✭ devonp


    smacl wrote: »
    Very pretty, but a 50k range and 28kg weight to shift if you go batteries low would be a problem. 35kph max also means you'd need to license and insure it like a moped.



    Looks like great gas, but also legally a moped AFAIK for license and insurance purposes given max speed. Can't be more than 25kph max here to escape this.


    yes thats what i was thinking...they were really moving
    not at all interested in an eBike...yet:D


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,801 ✭✭✭ Duckjob


    devonp wrote: »

    Products like these always seem a poor fit to me as far as the European market is concerned.

    I mean, why market a bike that goes only a little bit faster than the legal ebike regulations allow. If it's going to be classified as a moped or motorbike everywhere in the EU, then why not just make it more powerful and just concentrate on promoting its green credentials over petrol scooters and the like ?

    Or is their sales model just relying on people not bothering to stick to the regs ?


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 42,365 Mod ✭✭✭✭ magicbastarder


    managed to source an e-bike for my wife; humphries got one in which a customer had to pass on due to health issues, so we picked up a cube touring 400 today with less than 300 miles on the clock. very few signs of wear (unfortunately a couple of very minor scuffs on the control mechanism on the bars, presumably the previous owner turned it upside down at some point).

    was my first ever go on one too; very odd at first (the bike was in turbo mode which did enhance the experience), but we have been warned by another bike mechanic already to use the gears properly as they'll eat chains. i may even look into pre-emptively buying a spare chainwheel/chainring; the cassette/chain/RD are standard spec but i bet the chainring is specific and i don't want to find in a couple of years that they're hard to source in case it does need replacement.

    my wife loves the bike.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,245 ✭✭✭ Ferris


    I always keep a spare drivetrain for when the chain starts to skip links. Generally I get 2-3000km out of a chain but my bike has the CX motor so its tough on the gears - as am I. I get much less wear in dry conditions also. I buy chainwheels (a few euro), chains and cassettes from bike-discount as they stock bosch ebike parts. You may need a special tool to take off the chainwheel if you want to DIY. Is the motor gen 2 (small chainwheel ~ 15T) or a gen 3 or newer (normal chainwheel)?



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