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The Best Movie, You Never Want to See Again?

  • 14-09-2020 9:25am
    #1
    Moderators, Entertainment Moderators Posts: 27,814 Mod ✭✭✭✭ pixelburp


    Was inspired by this article about the very same topic, as it was an interesting point of discussion - and one I had been thinking about recently anyway.

    So. What's the best movie you ever saw ... ... that you absolutely will never want to watch again? And why, of course? We all have favourites we re-watch frequently, and obviously we rarely want to return to ostensibly bad films; but I think there are also those that for one reason or another, one just doesn't wish to touch again. Too slow, sad; maybe there's some personal aspect to the film that opens memories etc.

    A go-to answer for me anyway would definitely be "Logan". It was a beautiful, elegiac movie and send-off of the X-Men universe of the 2000s. A deep, meaningful and genuinely Good Movie about making amends at the very end ... but ye gods I don't think I could bring myself to watch it again. That'd be speaking as someone for whom those X-Men films were a formative part of my pop culture life (growing up with both those films, and the previous X-Men cartoon of the 90s). Patrick Stewart as well being such a huge cultural figure - and thoroughly decent human being to boot.

    I've said it before but "Logan" felt like a nihilistic rage, a burning down of that entire universe - to the extent that it retroactively made the series more depressing and doomed: all those struggles and fights - big and small - but Logan told us our heroes still lost ... and lost in the most heartbreaking ways imaginable. What they did to Professor X was evidence enough of that IMO. I really hate films that use mental illness or the cognitive decline of the elderly for plotting (a reason why "Joker" is probably another item on this list), so just on that aspect of the film alone makes it hard to want to go through it all again.


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 7,984 ✭✭✭ brevity


    Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. Although I have been thinking about revisiting it.

    It's an hard thing to forget about someone with whom you have been in love with. It happens naturally of course but to have it done deliberately seems...cold.

    I think Jim Carey's performance was absolutely excellent...perhaps for that I will (try) to re-watch it.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,535 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Dades


    Requiem for a Dream.

    Man, that was a tough watch. But the type of movie that really stays with you, like great films do.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,643 ✭✭✭ Homelander


    Irreversible. Great movie, but once was enough and it'll never quite leave you.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,540 ✭✭✭ tunguska


    Joker

    I remember coming out of this and remarking to a friend that I felt like I'd just been dragged through the wringer. Its an amazing film, from start to finish there wasnt a moment where I was bored or drifted off. The acting, the photography, the music, the dialogue.........it was all tight. It was such a convincing film and so brilliantly executed that it was actually like watching a man descend into madness right before your eyes. Which makes for uncomfortable viewing. Im glad it did so well commercially and critically but it'll be a long time before I can sit down and watch this again if ever.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,288 ✭✭✭ Cartman78


    Boyhood.

    We had two young kids (both boys) when this came out so this was basically a horror film for us :-)


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  • Moderators, Entertainment Moderators Posts: 17,708 Mod ✭✭✭✭ ixoy


    'Grave of the Fireflies'.

    Superb movie and I'd prefer a punch in the stomach than receiving its emotional punches again.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,984 ✭✭✭ brevity


    ixoy wrote: »
    'Grave of the Fireflies'.

    Superb movie and I'd prefer a punch in the stomach than receiving its emotional punches again.


    Yes. I was trying to think of this one.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,832 ✭✭✭ Stone Deaf 4evr


    American History X, mainly for the curbstomp scene.
    I have a very adverse reaction to things happening to fingers (particulary the nails), and teeth. and this scene nearly had me turn off the movie.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,810 ✭✭✭ Addle


    Similarly, the Wind that Shakes the Barley.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,871 ✭✭✭✭ snoopsheep


    really good question

    City of God is one of my favourite films, real tour-de-force stuff

    but no way would i sit through some of the scenes with the kids/violence again


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  • Registered Users Posts: 10,821 ✭✭✭✭ denartha


    tunguska wrote: »
    Joker

    I remember coming out of this and remarking to a friend that I felt like I'd just been dragged through the wringer. Its an amazing film, from start to finish there wasnt a moment where I was bored or drifted off. The acting, the photography, the music, the dialogue.........it was all tight. It was such a convincing film and so brilliantly executed that it was actually like watching a man descend into madness right before your eyes. Which makes for uncomfortable viewing. Im glad it did so well commercially and critically but it'll be a long time before I can sit down and watch this again if ever.

    When I read the thread title this is the movie i thought of.

    Fantastic movie but its a very tough watch.

    The Crimson Rivers is another one which springs to mind. French murder mystery. Terrific movie but it's really a one-off type of watch.

    I'd also add Oldboy. Another fantastic watch but can't see myself watching it again.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,966 ✭✭✭ homerun_homer


    I had this feeling after seeing The Lighthouse. I enjoyed the movie, it was batsh!t crazy the more it went on, but I felt no desire to see it again.

    That may change of course. It was just an immediate feeling I had at that time.


  • Registered Users Posts: 862 ✭✭✭ unplayable


    the revenant


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,737 ✭✭✭ stesaurus


    Sin City, loved the style and the movie itself when I watched it on release. I couldn't watch it again though


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,504 ✭✭✭✭ Sleepy


    I didn't enjoy it at the time, was the only one of the four who sat down to watch it who made it to the end and it's not a movie I'd ever recommend to anyone but over two decades later Todd Solondz' Happiness still comes to mind regularly which has to be a marker that the critical acclaim it received was deserved.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Computer Games Moderators, Entertainment Moderators Posts: 27,239 CMod ✭✭✭✭ johnny_ultimate


    I don’t think there’s any film I find to disturbing, unsettling or raw that I can revisit it again, but the ones I’m unlikely to rewatch (at least for many, many years) are gruelling long form films like Satantango or Shoah. Both films are harrowing in their own way, but I think it’s the sheer length of them - 7.5 and 10.5 hours respectively - that make them such a challenge.

    Shoah of course is also a startling, relentless and matter-of-fact account of one of modern history’s evilest atrocities, and Bela Tarr films offer no shortage of long shots of misery: even the directors’ shorter form works aren’t ‘easy’ watches. But I think when a film goes well beyond the three or four mark, requiring a substantial chunk of one or two days, a sort of physical exhaustion sets in alongside the gruelling subject matter. Both films are among the greatest films ever made and worthy of any cinephile’s attention - but they’d both be a hard thing to sit through again until at least a decade or two after that first viewing.


  • Registered Users Posts: 363 ✭✭ Cetyl Palmitate


    Uncut Gems

    Great movie. It did such a good job of transmitting the manic tension and pressure of the main character that I felt stressed until the following morning.

    No desire to go through that again.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,207 ✭✭✭ p to the e


    Like was mentioned above there are grim films which are fantastic that I may be reluctant to rewatch but still may at some point e.g. Martyrs, The Road.

    The ones I'd be more to not watch again are those long cerebral muscle stretchers that were on the watch list for an age and I finally got around to, really enjoyed but just couldn't sit down to again. First one that comes to mind is Solaris. I enjoyed this more than I expected and it really gave me food for thought for a few days after but at roughly 3 hours I may not sit down to it again.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,811 ✭✭✭ xieann


    Death Sentence with Kevin Bacon.

    Very very true to life. The US police still have to get a grip.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,002 ✭✭✭ misterbizmuth


    Not the best movie here, I did enjoy it in the cinema, but Sea of love with Al Pacino and Ellen Barkin. Reason being that once you already know the ending, (it's a whodunnit murder thriller if anyone doesn't know), the tension and suspense which made it so good the first time just evaporates with subsequent viewings. Still recommend watching it once though.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 769 ✭✭✭ seklly


    Kids from 1995 is the first one that springs to mind, it's quite disturbing and stays with you, well worth a watch (once!)


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,811 ✭✭✭ xieann


    Carlitos Way.

    Al Pacino a criminal who wants to clean up.

    His lawyer is coked out Sean Penn, perfect performance

    Once is enough to watch


  • Registered Users Posts: 76 ✭✭ Character Building


    Midnight Express is one that springs to mind for me. Watched it once about 15 years ago having picked up the DVD in an Xtra Vision 3 for 30 or 3 for 25 deal.

    I remember thinking at the time I'm glad I watched it but that I never wished to view it again. The box is still sitting on the shelf and probably hasn't been opened since.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,868 ✭✭✭ Easy Rod


    Snowtown. Australian movie based on real life events about a serial killer. Relentlessly grim but very well made.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,751 ✭✭✭✭ bnt


    Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. A quite astonishing and genuinely unsettling work that deservedly took the Palme d'Or at Cannes. If I watched it again, I think it would dilute the effect it had on me on first viewing.

    Parvi enim sunt foris arma, nisi est consilium domi.



  • Registered Users Posts: 626 ✭✭✭ Wedwood


    Schindlers List.

    A film everyone should see once, it’s nearly impossible to watch it again.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,883 ✭✭✭ Optimalprimerib


    A quiet place. I felt that it delivered all it had to offer in one sitting. It was my favorite film in that year and probably a few years as it delivered a different experience in the cinema. However I feel that it's edge maybe lost with multiple viewings and the premise is delicate with some plot armour to protect it, so I am never going to watch it again to allow it to sit on the mantle as a film I loved.

    Dunkirk and 1917 are two more that again the experience was great but multiple watches could hinder them rather than help them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,493 ✭✭✭ Car99


    Dades wrote: »
    Requiem for a Dream.

    Man, that was a tough watch. But the type of movie that really stays with you, like great films do.

    I watched that once probably 20 years ago. It still pops into my mind when I see some real life event that's comparable. I dont think I need to watch it again . Powerfully dark , once is enough though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,811 ✭✭✭ xieann


    Half Nelson

    American school teacher becomes junkie.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,811 ✭✭✭ xieann


    Donnie Brasco

    Undercover cop's life experience in the mafia.

    Johnny Depp with great support from Al Pacino.


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