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Hand Sanitizer diluted

  • 12-08-2020 10:54pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 304 ✭✭ Oxter


    On monday the hand sanitizer bottles in my local supermarket were both empty. I mentioned this to security who said they will refill them.

    Today i visited the same supermarket and the sanitizer felt thin and seemed to be heavily diluted.

    Anyone else come acrosd this?


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Comments

  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 4,077 ✭✭✭ Away With The Fairies


    Oxter wrote: »
    On monday the hand sanitizer bottles in my local supermarket were both empty. I mentioned this to security who said they will refill them.

    Today i visited the same supermarket and the sanitizer felt thin and seemed to be heavily diluted.

    Anyone else come acrosd this?

    Shops must be going through a tonne of it. And for what, for someone to come in, wipe their nose and put their hands to their mouths. If people don't understand, why bother?

    Also, pretty sure I've heard stories of petrol being watered down in some places, so wouldn't surprise me about hand sanitizer.

    I always bring my own to the shops. Have a small bottle in my pocket. I don't like the idea of touching what everybody else touched unless there's a sensor.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,222 ✭✭✭✭ the dunne


    Oxter wrote: »
    On monday the hand sanitizer bottles in my local supermarket were both empty. I mentioned this to security who said they will refill them.

    Today i visited the same supermarket and the sanitizer felt thin and seemed to be heavily diluted.

    Anyone else come acrosd this?

    Sanitise yourself. Ffs.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 917 MickeyLeari


    Oxter wrote: »
    On monday the hand sanitizer bottles in my local supermarket were both empty. I mentioned this to security who said they will refill them.

    Today i visited the same supermarket and the sanitizer felt thin and seemed to be heavily diluted.

    Anyone else come acrosd this?

    In Greece they are using Grappa (whatever the local equivalent is called)on the ferries as hand sanitiser - smells strong and would not go near a naked flame with it on.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,743 ✭✭✭ Heres Johnny


    Shops must be going through a tonne of it. And for what, for someone to come in, wipe their nose and put their hands to their mouths. If people don't understand, why bother?

    Also, pretty sure I've heard stories of petrol being watered down in some places, so wouldn't surprise me about hand sanitizer.

    I always bring my own to the shops. Have a small bottle in my pocket. I don't like the idea of touching what everybody else touched unless there's a sensor.

    Well the petrol story is nonsense for a start, water in fuel will destroy a cars engine.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,663 ✭✭✭✭ Timberrrrrrrr


    Shops must be going through a tonne of it. And for what, for someone to come in, wipe their nose and put their hands to their mouths. If people don't understand, why bother?

    Also, pretty sure I've heard stories of petrol being watered down in some places, so wouldn't surprise me about hand sanitizer.

    I always bring my own to the shops. Have a small bottle in my pocket. I don't like the idea of touching what everybody else touched unless there's a sensor.

    We were using a hand gel in work in a pump dispenser, they have now changed to a different brand and it looks/feels like water but is still 70% alcohol and does the same job.

    No garage is watering down petrol :rolleyes:


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,390 ✭✭✭ Jim_Hodge


    Consistency varies greatly in sanitisers. Doesn't mean they're watered down.


  • Registered Users Posts: 654 ✭✭✭ Irish_peppa


    Most shops I noticed the sanitiser is almost water like in consistency. I dont think big stores would risk watering down the sanitizer. As for using your own I wouldnt mind that but I would make sure people see me do it in the store I wouldnt like to be called out for ignoring the hand sanitiser station lol I know I have seen people bypass the hand sanitiser in my local lidl and I thought to myself "selfish" but then again It never occured that they may have used their own sanitiser they took in their pocket and applied outside so who knows. I personally prefer the gel types as you can be sure it gets to all your hand areas. The water like ones i find quite hard to work into all hand area.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,862 ✭✭✭ Adalynn Lemon Painting


    Most shops I noticed the sanitiser is almost water like in consistency. I dont think big stores would risk watering down the sanitizer. As for using your own I wouldnt mind that but I would make sure people see me do it in the store I wouldnt like to be called out for ignoring the hand sanitiser station lol I know I have seen people bypass the hand sanitiser in my local lidl and I thought to myself "selfish" but then again It never occured that they may have used their own sanitiser they took in their pocket and applied outside so who knows. I personally prefer the gel types as you can be sure it gets to all your hand areas. The water like ones i find quite hard to work into all hand area.

    Alcohol is like water in consistency too


  • Registered Users Posts: 68,333 ✭✭✭✭ seamus


    Most companies have stopped producing the gel-like substance, the additives to create it are in short supply. So they're just producing straight methanol or ethanol.

    The gel consistency is just to make it easier to rub on your hands anyway, it doesn't make it any more effective.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,122 ✭✭✭ FionnK86


    I don't think in todays social media world, a business would risk getting low level staff to spend time watering down sanitizer.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 203 ✭✭ Yourmama


    No garage is watering down petrol


    Not watering but mixing with old oils. And it does happen


  • Registered Users Posts: 654 ✭✭✭ Irish_peppa


    Yourmama wrote: »
    Not watering but mixing with old oils. And it does happen

    why would a garage be mixing old oils with petrol then selling it :confused:


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,699 ✭✭✭ Cheensbo


    Yourmama wrote: »
    Not watering but mixing with old oils. And it does happen

    Ethanol? :pac:


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 15,336 Mod ✭✭✭✭ woodchuck


    Most shops I noticed the sanitiser is almost water like in consistency. I dont think big stores would risk watering down the sanitizer. As for using your own I wouldnt mind that but I would make sure people see me do it in the store I wouldnt like to be called out for ignoring the hand sanitiser station lol I know I have seen people bypass the hand sanitiser in my local lidl and I thought to myself "selfish" but then again It never occured that they may have used their own sanitiser they took in their pocket and applied outside so who knows. I personally prefer the gel types as you can be sure it gets to all your hand areas. The water like ones i find quite hard to work into all hand area.

    This is really annoying actually. I prefer to use my own hand sanitiser, as I can control the amount that I use. The volume that comes out at some of the hand sanitisation stations is ridiculous, doesn't dry in properly and leaves you feeling really sticky. I just need to sanitise my hands, not my whole body! If I'm dipping in and out of a few shops, I'll naturally just sanitise my hands myself in between. But then some shops will have a dedicated person at the entrance "EXCUSE me, sanitise your hands please!". I literally just did 20 seconds ago and half a dozen times already in the last hour, grrr. And I don't want to have to faff about making a show of taking my own one out as I enter, because then I'm creating a bottleneck at the entrance.


  • Registered Users Posts: 811 ✭✭✭ angel eyes 2012


    Most shops I noticed the sanitiser is almost water like in consistency. I dont think big stores would risk watering down the sanitizer. As for using your own I wouldnt mind that but I would make sure people see me do it in the store I wouldnt like to be called out for ignoring the hand sanitiser station lol I know I have seen people bypass the hand sanitiser in my local lidl and I thought to myself "selfish" but then again It never occured that they may have used their own sanitiser they took in their pocket and applied outside so who knows. I personally prefer the gel types as you can be sure it gets to all your hand areas. The water like ones i find quite hard to work into all hand area.

    Using my own since March, I wouldn't touch any hand sanitiser in a public place, even before covid, there must be some amount of germs on them. I know some shops have the automatic dispenser but I still prefer to use my own.


  • Registered Users Posts: 530 ✭✭✭ Space Dog


    Using my own since March, I wouldn't touch any hand sanitiser in a public place, even before covid, there must be some amount of germs on them. I know some shops have the automatic dispenser but I still prefer to use my own.

    Yes, some of them are really grubby looking. I hate the spray bottles that some shops have. Or the ones where the built-in dispenser is only an inch over the drip pan so you can barely get your fingers under it and use the pump. I don't use those if I see them, use my own instead.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭ Tzardine


    I dont use them any more. Too many times have I used a shops sanitiser and the gel was either manky smelling (like a old manky smell, not an intentional smell), or it ended up turning to grit when I rubbed my hands.


  • Registered Users Posts: 648 ✭✭✭ DuffleBag


    Using my own since March, I wouldn't touch any hand sanitiser in a public place, even before covid, there must be some amount of germs on them. I know some shops have the automatic dispenser but I still prefer to use my own.

    But shur any germs on it would be killed or stopped by the sanitizer you use after you touch the bottle...?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,328 ✭✭✭ tphase


    In Greece they are using Grappa (whatever the local equivalent is called)on the ferries as hand sanitiser - smells strong and would not go near a naked flame with it on.
    in Greece they call it raki, it's basically the same as grappa


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,328 ✭✭✭ tphase


    seamus wrote: »
    Most companies have stopped producing the gel-like substance, the additives to create it are in short supply. So they're just producing straight methanol or ethanol.

    The gel consistency is just to make it easier to rub on your hands anyway, it doesn't make it any more effective.
    there won't be any methanol in sanitiser - it's nasty stuff.
    normally it will be ethanol, iso-propanol or a mixture of both with about 30% water
    (the water is necessary for the sanitiser to work)


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 917 MickeyLeari


    tphase wrote: »
    in Greece they call it raki, it's basically the same as grappa

    Thanks. Rotten stuff IMO to drink and on your hands, but the food is generally excellent, the beer not bad and some of the wines surprisingly good.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,815 ✭✭✭ raind


    why would a garage be mixing old oils with petrol then selling it :confused:

    Kerosene is used sometimes - up to 10% i have heard. The margins are very low on fuel, so even a small bit of the cheaper fuel may increase the margin on a litre of petrol. And although bad for the engine in the long term, effects wont become apparent for a bit of time meaning meaning it would be very difficult to trace back to an individual petrol station.

    I tend to avoid petrol station where I spot un-branded fuel tankers filling up the tanks


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,328 ✭✭✭ tphase


    Thanks. Rotten stuff IMO to drink and on your hands, but the food is generally excellent, the beer not bad and some of the wines surprisingly good.
    well, it's an acquired taste....
    like poitin, if you can get the good stuff it's very palatable. Mostly it's not.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 917 MickeyLeari


    tphase wrote: »
    well, it's an acquired taste....
    like poitin, if you can get the good stuff it's very palatable. Mostly it's not.

    Fair point - I have had some very good Grappa (former boss was Italian).


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,673 ✭✭✭ jam_mac_jam


    I use my own. Very few of them are automatic . I also wash my hands a lot.

    The ones in shops are not very clean and i would prefer not to touch something everyone else is touching. My own one is high alcohol content, I have no idea of what the shop is using.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,818 ✭✭✭ Darc19


    raind wrote: »
    Kerosene is used sometimes - up to 10% i have heard. The margins are very low on fuel, so even a small bit of the cheaper fuel may increase the margin on a litre of petrol. And although bad for the engine in the long term, effects wont become apparent for a bit of time meaning meaning it would be very difficult to trace back to an individual petrol station.

    I tend to avoid petrol station where I spot un-branded fuel tankers filling up the tanks

    Do you seriously believe that sh1te???

    Seriously?

    As for the unbranded tankers, it really shows a utter lack of knowledge.

    Do you refuse to purchase in Tesco cos you don't see a Tesco or Kelloggs or avonmore etc truck deliver???

    There are three or four main fuel delivery companies. Reynolds, South coast fuels are two of them. They may have various
    brands on their tankers but mostly they are plain white with the name on the cab.

    It makes not one jot of a difference whether it has the name of a fuel brand on it or not.


    As for sanitizer, some is totally liquid mist spray, some have higher levels of gel, some are in between. We use one that has a high level of Aromatherapy oils from a Spanish company as it moisturises the hands at the same time.

    But viscosity is not a sign of anything other than less gel.


  • Registered Users Posts: 811 ✭✭✭ angel eyes 2012


    DuffleBag wrote: »
    But shur any germs on it would be killed or stopped by the sanitizer you use after you touch the bottle...?

    No sanitizer is 100% effective at killing germs and washing hands properly is far more effective. I've always been a stickler for not touching surfaces with my hands in public places such as door handles, lifts, stairs and escalators. I have been on immune suppression medication for nearly 20 years and ironically I never get colds or viruses.


  • Registered Users Posts: 27,467 ✭✭✭✭ drunkmonkey


    Over 150 banned in the USA, The HSA here say that sanitizer should be correctly labeled here if it's for public use.
    I don't expect our government to take the issue of toxic santaiser seriously like everything else.
    https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/health/a33217666/fda-recalls-hand-sanitizers-coronavirus/


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 965 ✭✭✭ shaveAbullock


    tphase wrote: »
    in Greece they call it raki, it's basically the same as grappa

    That's a terrible idea, better than nothing but 40 - 50% alcohol is considered too low to be very effective.
    Do they distil it to a higher concentration? That usually requires a licence from the government.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 917 MickeyLeari


    That's a terrible idea, better than nothing but 40 - 50% alcohol is considered too low to be very effective.
    Do they distil it to a higher concentration? That usually requires a licence from the government.

    Generally most spirits are higher alcohol after distillation, and are then watered down And/or lose alcohol strength over time as they mature in casks. I would have no doubt that it was greater than 70%.

    Further it is also the case in Ireland that alcohol producers stepped in to make sanitizer when we had the shortage in March. This included Irish distillers who provided to the HSE.


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