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Building your own firearm.

  • 14-07-2020 7:41pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,005 ✭✭✭ Zxthinger
    Registered User


    So, this is just a theroretical question.
    Is it possible to build and licence your own firearm or is there some law prohibiting such endeavours.

    In the US people do it but they can't sell these guns to anyone.
    Any thoughts..?


«1

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 6,191 ✭✭✭ Feisar
    Registered User


    I presume and it's only that, a presumption, that you would need to licence and then build.

    First they came for the socialists...



  • Registered Users Posts: 14,342 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45
    Registered User


    Not under the Irish legislation.That can only be done by a gunsmith/gundealer...<MOD SNIP>
    What you could do,if it was an Ar15 design is buy in the parts and get a liscensed gunsmith to assemble the gun for you.Which is no biggie once you have a couple of correct tools.
    If it is some new custom firearm you have thought up yourself,I'd find a qualified gunsmith who knows his stuff and co work with him to build you the gun from scratch.And you have both signed an indemnity agreement ,that if this thing after the 1st shot has exploded an you are standing there like Yosemite Sam,fter Bugs has plugged his gun barrel,he is not responsible.

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



  • Registered Users Posts: 428 ✭✭ Brontosaurus
    Registered User


    Do you mean actually manufacturing parts yourself? You need a license to manufacture firearms in this country. Unfortunately the laws regarding firearms in this country are so daft that technically even making a nice wooden stock is considered manufacturing a firearm, as all parts of a firearms are *technically* firearm parts.

    In order to obtain a licence to manufacture, AFAIK you have to meet some pretty stringent criteria and would only be worth while if you seriously plan to do this on a commercial basis, or if you have a **** tonne of disposable income and a lot of patience to deal with the peculiarities of the law.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,005 ✭✭✭ Zxthinger
    Registered User


    So my interpretation is that such activities are not permitted by way of trade or business etc etc
    Have you ever repaired a gun? Perhaps you filed an extraction claw to stop it slipping? Or made a replacement replacement firing pin? All very simple repairs but not done for profit and done on a licenced firearm.


    http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/eli/1925/act/17/section/10/enacted/en/html#sec10

    10.—(1) On and after the commencement of this Act it shall not be lawful for any person to manufacture, sell, repair, test, or prove, or expose for sale, or have in his possession for sale, repair, test, or proof, by way of trade or business, any firearm or ammunition unless such person is registered in the register of firearms dealers.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone
    Registered User


    Zxthinger wrote: »
    So my interpretation is that such activities are not permitted by way of trade or business etc etc
    Have you ever repaired a gun? Perhaps you filed an extraction claw to stop it slipping? Or made a replacement replacement firing pin? All very simple repairs but not done for profit and done on a licenced firearm.


    http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/eli/1925/act/17/section/10/enacted/en/html#sec10

    10.—(1) On and after the commencement of this Act it shall not be lawful for any person to manufacture, sell, repair, test, or prove, or expose for sale, or have in his possession for sale, repair, test, or proof, by way of trade or business, any firearm or ammunition unless such person is registered in the register of firearms dealers.

    But an agent of a dealer can have in his possession firearms, parts of firearms and do the gunsmithing work ?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 14,342 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45
    Registered User


    tudderone wrote: »
    But an agent of a dealer can have in his possession firearms, parts of firearms and do the gunsmithing work ?

    Short answer Yes. If you are a gun dealer or smith and registerd you can build the things or repair them.Which is scary as a dealer is a whole different kettle of haddock to a gunsmith.

    As for DIY repair jobs thats a bit different to actually going and making a gun from raw materials.Although a good rule of thumb here should be.If it involves heat,or creating metallic shavings or spall. Best leave it to a qualified gunsmith.

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,005 ✭✭✭ Zxthinger
    Registered User


    Fair points there Griz.

    Let's say you want to build yer own. In theory it can't be for sale or transfer, and that my opinion & not a claim on interpretation on the law.. ok

    Would proofing be a consideration that would need attention or are we still exempt or in a gray area?

    Would you apply for the licence and then list the item as not yet manufactured?

    In the absence of a serial number how might one be selected?

    This all sounds complicated but a single shot rifle or shotgun is fairly simple in its design
    A crossbow might be a more apt example that people might relate too without getting all worked up.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone
    Registered User


    Ireland had many talented gunmakers in the past, John Rigby, who is still going today, Stephen Grant, who served his apprenticeship with Kavanagh in Dawson street in Dublin, went to London and his products were as good if not better than the Purdey, Holland and Holland guns, he supplied the great and the good, including british and European royality.

    I have a side by side sidelock made by Trulock in Parliament street Dublin, and the workmanship in it is as good as you would find anywhere.

    The last factory making guns in Ireland was down in Tipperary i think, they were going into the 1980's, but i think they were getting aggrevation from the PTB and folded.

    https://ramrodantiques.blogspot.com


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,342 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45
    Registered User


    [
    The last factory making guns in Ireland was down in Tipperary i think, they were going into the 1980's, but i think they were getting aggrevation from the PTB and folded.

    Ah The Fenian shotgun of Birr fame.Why we have the proof act of 1968. The oddest piece of legislation on the books in Ireland. Set up the proof house an all,but didnt want to appoint or pay for a Birmingham master proofer,and it was just as handy to import proofed barrels and actins from the UK

    They folded long before the 1980s.It just wasnt a good product more than anything else ,and the owner was even accused of being a British agent in Dail debates
    Dáil Éireann - Volume 269 - 21 November, 1973) http://historical-debates.oireachtas.ie/D/0269/D.0269.197311210031.html
    [

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



  • Registered Users Posts: 14,342 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45
    Registered User


    Zxthinger wrote: »
    Fair points there Griz.

    Let's say you want to build yer own. In theory it can't be for sale or transfer, and that my opinion & not a claim on interpretation on the law.. ok

    Would proofing be a consideration that would need attention or are we still exempt or in a gray area?

    Would you apply for the licence and then list the item as not yet manufactured?

    In the absence of a serial number how might one be selected?

    This all sounds complicated but a single shot rifle or shotgun is fairly simple in its design
    A crossbow might be a more apt example that people might relate too without getting all worked up.


    The proofing thing is really gray.We have an act,but dont enforce it,eventhough guns are now being made here,and rifles are precluded from the act too for some reasson.Most guns that are imported are either UK or EU country proofed,so I guess it makes the Irish act superflous,and the US guns are accepted as is too when imported direct from the US. So based on all that.I dont know!
    :eek:

    I'd say you'd have to have your gunsmith build it first and then apply for the liscense Under the EU directive he does have to mark the reciver with his details and serial number,and the pressure bearing parts have to have matching serial numbers as well. So if it is a custom once off it can be called "The xthinger special,by J Fksticks Ireland serial nr 00001" for example. The serial nr and the name of the gun would be then on your liscense.

    A crossbow??Jeeze! where do you put any serial numbers on that?

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone
    Registered User


    Grizzly 45 wrote: »
    [



    Ah The Fenian shotgun of Birr fame.Why we have the proof act of 1968. The oddest piece of legislation on the books in Ireland. Set up the proof house an all,but didnt want to appoint or pay for a Birmingham master proofer,and it was just as handy to import proofed barrels and actins from the UK

    They folded long before the 1980s.It just wasnt a good product more than anything else ,and the owner was even accused of being a British agent in Dail debates
    Dáil Éireann - Volume 269 - 21 November, 1973) http://historical-debates.oireachtas.ie/D/0269/D.0269.197311210031.html
    [


    Are you sure ? I remember seeing an advert for the guns and didn't think it was that old. The problem with the gun trade here was it was just so much easier to get stuff made up in Birmingham or leige. I see a lot of Irish guns and they have Brum or leige proofmarks, Just the retailers name stamped on.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone
    Registered User


    Grizzly 45 wrote: »
    The proofing thing is really gray.We have an act,but dont enforce it,eventhough guns are now being made here,and rifles are precluded from the act too for some reasson.Most guns that are imported are either UK or EU country proofed,so I guess it makes the Irish act superflous,and the US guns are accepted as is too when imported direct from the US. So based on all that.I dont know!
    :eek:

    I'd say you'd have to have your gunsmith build it first and then apply for the liscense Under the EU directive he does have to mark the reciver with his details and serial number,and the pressure bearing parts have to have matching serial numbers as well. So if it is a custom once off it can be called "The xthinger special,by J Fksticks Ireland serial nr 00001" for example. The serial nr and the name of the gun would be then on your liscense.

    A crossbow??Jeeze! where do you put any serial numbers on that?


    Most American guns and rifles are proofed, the makers do it themselves, after all America is a very litigious place. Someone killed or maimed could be the end of your company.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,342 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45
    Registered User


    tudderone wrote: »
    Are you sure ? I remember seeing an advert for the guns and didn't think it was that old. The problem with the gun trade here was it was just so much easier to get stuff made up in Birmingham or leige. I see a lot of Irish guns and they have Brum or liege proofmarks, Just the retailers name stamped on.

    Positive.They ceased trading about 1970 according to company house records.

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



  • Registered Users Posts: 14,342 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45
    Registered User


    tudderone wrote: »
    Most American guns and rifles are proofed, the makers do it themselves, after all America is a very litigious place. Someone killed or maimed could be the end of your company.

    SAMMI,but thy don't test individual guns, they might batch test a group. They still have guns explode occasionaly over there.

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,805 ✭✭✭ juice1304
    Registered User


    Grizzly 45 wrote: »
    SAMMI,but thy don't test individual guns, they might batch test a group. They still have guns explode occasionaly over there.

    Every American manufacturer I know individually proofs their guns.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,805 ✭✭✭ juice1304
    Registered User


    As for building your own firearm here the only people who can do it are registered firearms dealers. There is no way around it and if they even thought you were going to manufacture something they would be all over you and harrass you for the rest of your life. And you can be sure they would take any toolding they thought could be used and any judge would sign off on it because the ptb can do whatever they want to people in this country and especially when it comes to firearms.
    If you even want to do simple repair jobs under the licence of a registered dealer it has to be approved by the DOJ and done on their registered premises. I spoke with the doj about this in lenght.
    And i can say if they even thought a dealer were manufacturing they would be very interested in it and would probably cause an aful lot of problem.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,005 ✭✭✭ Zxthinger
    Registered User


    Well to come clean .... I was thinking about building a medieval crossbow. But as usual no fun is permitted here. No interest in modern units.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone
    Registered User


    Zxthinger wrote: »
    Well to come clean .... I was thinking about building a medieval crossbow. But as usual no fun is permitted here. No interest in modern units.

    Welcome to Ireland :rolleyes:


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,805 ✭✭✭ juice1304
    Registered User


    Zxthinger wrote: »
    Well to come clean .... I was thinking about building a medieval crossbow. But as usual no fun is permitted here. No interest in modern units.

    Ye that would be a fun project, i plan on building one myself but not here. Its a shame this country is so backward and they can just ban everything so easily without any thought or logical reasoning.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone
    Registered User


    juice1304 wrote: »
    Ye that would be a fun project, i plan on building one myself but not here. Its a shame this country is so backward and they can just ban everything so easily without any thought or logical reasoning.

    Its called being "progressive" m'kay :rolleyes:.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 14,342 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45
    Registered User


    There are that I know of ,three medival reenactors who have apprently built and liscensed crossbows here of those types.So it can be done?
    According to them they approached their local cheifs and asked what the situation would be about doing such for re enactment and had a very positive response to the projects.
    So might be worth a try?

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



  • Registered Users Posts: 14,342 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45
    Registered User


    juice1304 wrote: »
    Every American manufacturer I know individually proofs their guns.

    So how do I know this as a consumer?And thanks for that info!! Ill be sueing Remington for selling me a used gun as a new item,as if you put one shot down a gun in the US its classified as used!
    Were that the case,US gun makers wouldnt be doing the odd annual product recalls or issuing saftey warnings, as these faults would be picked up on individual guns and faulty batches were they proof tested like in Europe.

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,805 ✭✭✭ juice1304
    Registered User


    Grizzly 45 wrote: »
    So how do I know this as a consumer?And thanks for that info!! Ill be sueing Remington for selling me a used gun as a new item,as if you put one shot down a gun in the US its classified as used!
    Were that the case,US gun makers wouldnt be doing the odd annual product recalls or issuing saftey warnings, as these faults would be picked up on individual guns and faulty batches were they proof tested like in Europe.



    I guess ruger are selling used guns then. And winchester, mossberg, remington, daniel defense, barrett etc. and practically any other manufacturer i can think of. Ive spoken with many of these manufacturers in person at IWA you can also read it on many of their websites and it has been shown in plenty of videos.
    Those other issues are design issues and wouldnt be noticed in proofing


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,342 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45
    Registered User


    juice1304 wrote: »


    I guess ruger are selling used guns then. And winchester, mossberg, remington, daniel defense, barrett etc. and practically any other manufacturer i can think of. Ive spoken with many of these manufacturers in person at IWA you can also read it on many of their websites and it has been shown in plenty of videos.
    Those other issues are design issues and wouldnt be noticed in proofing

    So sort of like Boeing being able to sign off on the 737 C Max itself then?:P
    Yeah fired guns.All those guns advertised then as "NEVER fired NIB" should have a cavaet of excluding makers test fire and zeroing rounds . Its the semantics of legal and advertising over there.:rolleyes:

    Seriosly?No one woudld notice a fault like the S&W Mp15 slam firing in a proof fire situation? You know that would be out the door if that happened in Ulm or Leige in the proof house.
    Call me a bit old fashioned,but in this case I think we in Europe got it right. I mean you dont hear of Sauer,or Walther or Benelli or Austrian made Glock firearms detonating with normal factory loads.seems to happen a bit with US brands.:confused: Might ask these US company reps next time about that,and whats the situation for product liability in cases like that?

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone
    Registered User


    On some of the American made firearms i have bought, 2 ruger .22 pistols for instance, you get a little envelope with a fired case in it. I believe in some states in the US you take this case and lodge it with the local police ? So those guns are deffo fired at the factory.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,342 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45
    Registered User


    That's a new one... Never heard of that!:eek:
    The only state I've ever heard of attempting that was Maryland, and they abandoned the idea as being too impractical,and had solved zero gun crime.We even toyed with the idea here and promptly killed it too as impractical back in the 1970s.

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone
    Registered User


    Grizzly 45 wrote: »
    That's a new one... Never heard of that!:eek:
    The only state I've ever heard of attempting that was Maryland, and they abandoned the idea as being too impractical,and had solved zero gun crime.We even toyed with the idea here and promptly killed it too as impractical back in the 1970s.

    Yup, it was required in Maryland and New York. When you register the gun, the spent case is taken and kept on file.

    Edit, its been discontinued as being............well bloody useless.

    https://www.nraila.org/articles/20151113/shell-casing-shell-games


  • Registered Users Posts: 214 ✭✭ Stephenc66
    Registered User


    I seem to remember adverts in "Guns and Ammo" magazines of the 80's advertising kits of parts to build Black Powder firearms (In the US)


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,342 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45
    Registered User


    They still exist.
    Connecticut Valley Arms [CVA] until it was taken over and is now known as Traditions,as does Dixie gun works, make them. Pretty simple kit and it teaches you some woodworking, gun blueing and fitting skills. As they aren't classified as firearms stateside and in some more progressive EU countries...Anyone can buy and play with them.Even BP revolvers as they are classified as a non-firearm or a curio and relic design over 60 years old.

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone
    Registered User


    Grizzly 45 wrote: »
    They still exist.
    Connecticut Valley Arms [CVA] until it was taken over and is now known as Traditions,as does Dixie gun works, make them. Pretty simple kit and it teaches you some woodworking, gun blueing and fitting skills. As they aren't classified as firearms stateside and in some more progressive EU countries...Anyone can buy and play with them.Even BP revolvers as they are classified as a non-firearm or a curio and relic design over 60 years old.

    As well as having a blackpowder only hunting season in America. Its amazing, even in eastern European countries which were under the heel of the USSR only a very short time ago, they seem to have better gun/hunting laws than the complete mess we have.
    I subscribe to this chap in Hungary, and things seem very common sense out there.



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