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Benefits of Public Sector over Private Sector

  • 03-06-2020 11:45am
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 454 ✭✭ snoopboggybog


    I have interview in three weeks for a role, obviously salary is better and more holidays but anything i should be aware of like been easier to let go etc.

    Has there been ever a huge layoff of public sector staff?

    Thanks


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 7,127 ✭✭✭ Lux23


    I think a major benefit is that you won't ever be laid off, but you could be asked to take early retirement. When comparing the salary, make sure you take into account pension payments because your net pay can be a lot smaller than expected.


  • Registered Users Posts: 47,093 ✭✭✭✭ tayto lover


    If you have a good job in the Private Sector then stay in it.
    Better money and perks there.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 514 ✭✭✭ thomasdylan


    If you have a good job in the Private Sector then stay in it.
    Better money and perks there.

    I think they're saying the money is the job they're applying for is better than their current private sector gig?

    Public sector job will be more secure which is going to be very important in the next few years.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 454 ✭✭ snoopboggybog


    30 days holidays compared to 22 in my current role
    Extra 7K now and be extra 15k in total after a couple of years.

    Job is a lot easier than my current role as well


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,904 ✭✭✭✭ Mrs OBumble


    Lux23 wrote: »
    I think a major benefit is that you won't ever be laid off,

    I don't think that's really guaranteed. The government could easily enough change the laws to allow it.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 17,107 ✭✭✭✭ kippy


    30 days holidays compared to 22 in my current role
    Extra 7K now and be extra 15k in total after a couple of years.

    Job is a lot easier than my current role as well
    That 15k extra is more likely to be 6 years or more away as opposed to a couple of years.
    You'll generally end up with a lot less net pay than the equivalent private sector pay. No bonus, no healthcare no additional perks that are available in some private sector jobs.
    There are things in the public sector that will rankle you but that's the same as private I suppose.
    A thing called collective bargaining can work for or against you. Compulsory redundancy is rare enough but can happen. Compulsorary redeployment can happen.


  • Registered Users Posts: 71 ✭✭ Arealred


    I would suprised if interview went ahead for any job in next few weeks particularly in the public sector where they generally interview alot of candidates. With social distancing it could be a good while before interviews take place. Maybe it's via zoom?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,519 ✭✭✭ GalwayGrrrrrl


    Our department has done Skype/zoom interviews over the last few weeks. Public sector, small number of candidates for a specialist role.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,316 ✭✭✭ Pkiernan


    30 days holidays compared to 22 in my current role
    Extra 7K now and be extra 15k in total after a couple of years.

    Job is a lot easier than my current role as well

    You forgot to add the 40 sick day holidays


  • Registered Users Posts: 395 ✭✭ whampiri


    Pkiernan wrote: »
    You forgot to add the 40 sick day holidays

    Where did you see this? Sounds great! I could be outraged but I know it's not true.

    @op. There are a number of positives and negatives to working in the CS vs the Private sector.

    Advantage
    Family friendly work practice
    Generally better job security
    Great training and development opportunities
    Large organisations with varied work
    Wage negotiation through unions
    Set Annual increments based on acceptable performance

    Disadvantage
    No bonuses
    No benefit in kind
    You'll never earn super high wages
    No direct wage negotiation
    Higher pay for higher qualification
    Promotion based on competitions not performance


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  • Registered Users Posts: 522 ✭✭✭ kazamo


    Pension, in the years to come this will make a big difference in how financially secure you are in your retirement.
    There are very few DC schemes in the private sector and they are closed to new entrants anyway, some for over 20 years.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,316 ✭✭✭ Pkiernan


    whampiri wrote: »
    Where did you see this? Sounds great! I could be outraged but I know it's not true..

    You're right, I grossly underestimated it.

    The Paid Sick Leave scheme provides for a maximum of 92 days on full pay in a rolling one year period, followed by a maximum of 91 days on half pay.

    This is subject to a maximum of 183 days paid sick leave in a rolling four year period.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,020 ✭✭✭ Treppen


    kazamo wrote: »
    Pension, in the years to come this will make a big difference in how financially secure you are in your retirement.
    There are very few DC schemes in the private sector and they are closed to new entrants anyway, some for over 20 years.



    Pension for public sector has changed to career average now, so if the op is in the more senior side then might not be all that great. And it's taken out of your wages whether you like it or not.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,236 ✭✭✭ Dr. Kenneth Noisewater


    Pkiernan wrote: »
    You're right, I grossly underestimated it.

    The Paid Sick Leave scheme provides for a maximum of 92 days on full pay in a rolling one year period, followed by a maximum of 91 days on half pay.

    This is subject to a maximum of 183 days paid sick leave in a rolling four year period.

    So you're intimating that every public servant takes 183 days paid sick leave in 4 years? Stop. Sign me (back) up!


  • Registered Users Posts: 395 ✭✭ whampiri


    Pkiernan wrote: »
    You're right, I grossly underestimated it.

    The Paid Sick Leave scheme provides for a maximum of 92 days on full pay in a rolling one year period, followed by a maximum of 91 days on half pay.

    This is subject to a maximum of 183 days paid sick leave in a rolling four year period.

    You are misrepresenting the facts. There's a sick leave scheme in place for people who require it. It's not automatic as you insinuate and most people are fortunate enough not to need it.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 454 ✭✭ snoopboggybog


    So lets say my starting wage is 50K, how much of that has to go into a pension and what would take home pay be versus private sector.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,473 ✭✭✭ jim o doom


    From a department I have knowledge of, you can have max 5 days uncertified sick leave over a 2 year period, and if your certified sick leave exceeds certain levels, you won't get your pay increment, and you will be prevented from getting promotions.

    According to this journal article from 2016, public servants take on average 8.5 sick days a year vs 4.5 in the private sector, so this whole thing of taking 92 sick days is ridiculous. There may be some staff members with genuine problems like serious depression or illnesses that increase the average to 8.5, but large amounts of sick leave being taken left and right is definitely incorrect. https://www.thejournal.ie/poll-public-sector-sick-days-2869650-Jul2016/#:~:text=Public%20servants%20average%208.5%20sick,the%20public%20service%20in%202015.

    In terms of wage increases - generally speaking, unless you are high up level like AP / Principal Officer, your increment each year is in or around a grand, so your bi-weekly wage increases can be between €8 to €20, and if you are getting a high level like PO or A-Sec and above, you are going to be dealing with a serious amount of stress. Even people at AP level can be worked to the bone for the money they are earning.

    The leave is a huge advantage, and many departments have implemented distance working protocols in the face of Covid (where possible), and I hope this means that there will be more people given the ability to work from home as a result of this sea change in practice. There is also flexi time operated if you are not on a specific shift in some departments, currently suspended due to the pandemic.

    There is also good training opportunities and many departments will repay the fees for courses that you complete that are relevant to your role, this sort of thing can be excellent for career progression, if that is something that you are interested in.

    Like any job, you could get a department or area with a/hole bosses and/or colleagues, or you can end up in one with very driven and friendly people, that's really down to the luck of the draw. Some areas are incredibly backwards, some are very forward thinking.. again down to luck.

    edit -

    Also, if there is a recession / economic contraction, your terms and conditions will be unilaterally changed, your hours increased, and your wages decreased, along with multi-year moritoriums on recruitment, meaning that your departments will shrink and workload grow over a period of many years - I am very muchexpecting this to happen in the near future as a result of worldwide recession we are about to face as a result of the pandemic. (worth it though as you get to have a job, even if it is paying less).


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,188 ✭✭✭✭ Geuze


    So lets say my starting wage is 50K, how much of that has to go into a pension and what would take home pay be versus private sector.

    It's complex.

    Start with 6.5%.

    Plus 3.33% ASC on earnings over 34,500

    Then 3.5% on over 60k.

    https://www.tcd.ie/hr/assets/pdf/pensions_note_asc.pdf


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,874 ✭✭✭ Sarn


    So lets say my starting wage is 50K, how much of that has to go into a pension and what would take home pay be versus private sector.

    Annual take home would be approximately €34,297 Vs €36787.

    Taxcalc.ie gives a good breakdown.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,316 ✭✭✭ Pkiernan


    whampiri wrote: »
    You are misrepresenting the facts. There's a sick leave scheme in place for people who require it. It's not automatic as you insinuate and most people are fortunate enough not to need it.

    I have stated the facts.

    Public workers take on average almost twice as many sick days as private workers.

    The number of sick days taken by Ireland's public servants is almost twice that taken by workers in the private sector according to new figures. Public servants average 8.5 sick days each year compared to 4.5 days in theprivate sector according to figures released by the Department of PublicExpenditure.

    Funny how they get sick so much more often isn't it?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,665 ✭✭✭ Fann Linn


    Pkiernan wrote: »
    I have stated the facts.

    Public workers take on average almost twice as many sick days as private workers.

    The number of sick days taken by Ireland's public servants is almost twice that taken by workers in the private sector according to new figures. Public servants average 8.5 sick days each year compared to 4.5 days in theprivate sector according to figures released by the Department of PublicExpenditure.

    Funny how they get sick so much more often isn't it?

    Nurses, medical personnel followed by attacks on Gardai, Prison officers,emergency services personnel skew these sick leave differences.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,107 ✭✭✭✭ kippy


    Pkiernan wrote: »
    I have stated the facts.

    Public workers take on average almost twice as many sick days as private workers.

    The number of sick days taken by Ireland's public servants is almost twice that taken by workers in the private sector according to new figures. Public servants average 8.5 sick days each year compared to 4.5 days in theprivate sector according to figures released by the Department of PublicExpenditure.

    Funny how they get sick so much more often isn't it?
    I don't know what the issue is here to be honest.
    There are strict protocols around sick leave.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 454 ✭✭ snoopboggybog


    Sarn wrote: »
    Annual take home would be approximately €34,297 Vs €36787.

    Taxcalc.ie gives a good breakdown.

    Sorry not for sounding dumb but where does that 2500 go?

    Into a private pension fund or towards the state pension?


  • Registered Users Posts: 201 ✭✭ Sir Guy who smiles


    Pliernan:
    Public sector workers take 40 days sick leave.

    Another poster:
    No they take 8.5
    Pkiernan wrote: »
    I have stated the facts


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,473 ✭✭✭ jim o doom


    Pkiernan wrote: »

    Funny how they get sick so much more often isn't it?

    The public sector employs a higher number of staff with physical and mental disabilities than the private sector as a policy to ensure that all sorts of people can have a job. People with health issues have a higher amount of sick leave.

    The public sector also supports staff who endure long term illnesses, be they mental or physical, rather than forcing them out of their jobs. This brings up the average.

    There are also some dickheads (that are hard to fire who take a disproportionate amount of sick leave that also brings up the average.

    It does not mean that each public sector work takes 8 days of sick leave, it's an average.

    Have you got any figures for your earlier "facts" where you claimed people were taking 40 days sick leave?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 454 ✭✭ snoopboggybog


    Garda, Prison officers, Nurses, Doctors, Firemen, Social Workers etc.

    All very stressful jobs and may need sick days if something happens to them or witness something.

    Do people expect a prison officer to go back the next day after getting stabbed or something or a Garda trying to resuscitate someone after been stabbed and dying.


  • Registered Users Posts: 201 ✭✭ Sir Guy who smiles


    OP, in the public sector your conditions will depend on how the country is doing.

    Country doing well:
    You'll probably never be let go but you might be redeployed,
    Your pay will go up even if you don't deserve it,
    People will tell you that you do no work of value, and if you had any talent or courage you'd make real money in the private sector.

    Country doing badly:

    You'll probably never be let go but you might be redeployed,
    Your pay will go down even if you don't deserve it,
    People will tell you that you do no work of value, and that you are part of a closeted elite that is ruining the country.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,316 ✭✭✭ nthclare


    I'd just work in an environment you're happy with.
    I studied horticulture and arboriculture, got a job in the public sector in forestry and parklands.

    The pay is good, I get all the best PPE and when the weather is too bad outside I have a nursery and workshop for maintaining machinery, and raring plants... an automated irrigation system included.
    Heater's if it's freezing and a laptop included for ordering stock, rarely do I have to engage with the HR staff or procurement on a one to one basis.

    You'll get people here telling you one's better than the other but I'd tell them they haven't a clue about contentment and joy in the work place.

    Asking people on Board's for advice brings out people who have a personal gripe with the job security of public sector workers.
    A lot of them are insecure about the private sector and need to vent on board's.

    Security is better than insecurity that's for sure.
    I've read it all on Board's and have myself experienced the come down from people leaving the public sector for a so called lucrative deal in the private sector with its perks and benefits.
    Sadly the private sector is ruthless and if you want to be successful you have to move Jobs every 3 year's, especially in management and CEO positions which are mostly fluff jobs anyhow...

    At the end of the day it's your choice, but I'd be leaning towards the public sector myself.

    So what if people take more sick leave in the public sector, we're working too many hours anyhow. Not enough down time to breathe and relax, were not designed to be all work and no rest.

    It's sad to see so called professional private sector workers staying on until all hour's to put money into the pockets of someone else, wasting electricity and water just for a pat on the back by their peer's and also not to go home to face the family...

    If you have to work overtime on a salary that pays you for 40 hrs a week it's a sign you're incompetent and can't fulfill the requirements for your position,and are overworked...


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 443 ✭✭ Hairy Japanese BASTARDS!


    I don't think that's really guaranteed. The government could easily enough change the laws to allow it.

    Lol. Watch the union backlash if that happened.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 443 ✭✭ Hairy Japanese BASTARDS!


    Good pay in some sectors. Teachers start on 34k and go up to 64k with no added responsibility.

    30 days leave as opposed to 22.

    Private sector pensions are at the mercy of the economy and the government can decide to step in and take a lump out. Public pensions are guaranteed. Public pensions are calculated as (number of years service / 80) X final salary.

    Harder to fire for poor performance.

    Absenteeism not punished in the same way.

    Little or no performance reviews or PIP schemes.


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