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Miroku

  • 06-05-2020 9:16am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭ paulireland


    Hi there
    Anyone know of a Miroku dealer here in Ireland
    Many thanks
    Paul


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Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 213 ✭✭ 270WIN


    irishshootingsports..knocknagoshel co kerry. Liam Walsh


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,772 ✭✭✭ meathstevie


    Failing that a Browning dealer should be able to help you as well, Miroku is a horse from the same stable.


  • Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭ paulireland


    Many thanks for the info.I am in Wicklow so Kerry is a log way away


  • Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭ paulireland


    Is there really such a thing as left and right hand stocks.As you can see I am new to this


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    Is there really such a thing as left and right hand stocks.As you can see I am new to this

    Yes, they are bent slightly off the centreline of the gun so your eye lines up with the barrel rib. I think Ardee sports are the importers of Browning and Miroku here. You could ring them.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭ paulireland


    Thanks tudderone


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,168 ✭✭✭ Rosahane


    Many thanks for the info.I am in Wicklow so Kerry is a log way away

    Hilltop in Newtownmountkennedy might be worth a call. He has had Miroku for sale and can probably get one in. Pat is also a good man to advise on gun fit.


  • Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭ paulireland


    Thanks for that.I will check it out


  • Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭ paulireland


    If you join a Clay club do you still need landowners permission.Also can you import a shotgun from abroad


  • Registered Users Posts: 473 ✭✭ The pigeon man


    If you join a Clay club do you still need landowners permission.Also can you import a shotgun from abroad

    The range membership will get you the license but you should put down a permission and tick the box for hunting if you intend to hunt.

    Yes you can import a gun if you are after a particular model.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭ paulireland


    Thank you
    I wont be hunting-just clay
    Whats the process for importing


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,789 ✭✭✭ slavetothegrind


    Paul, paddy carley in wexford would be another good option for you, he has a clay club down there too , Ballyvake CPC


  • Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭ paulireland


    Many thanks for that.Contacted him and he is most helpful


  • Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭ paulireland


    Hi again all
    Just a thought here
    If I buy a grade1 and have a grade3/5 stock made will it be cheaper than buying a G5
    There seems to be a big price hike between G1 and G5 from suppliers
    Many thanks
    Paul


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    They are functionally the same gun, the g5 has better graded wood and engraving, but mechanically they are the same. Depends on what you want to do with the gun, hit targets or look at it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭ paulireland


    Well said
    My thinking is this.I am right handed but have to shoot left handed(dont ask)
    So if I get a standard gun and a made to measure stock its easier to sell with the standard stock if I change guns
    Hope that makes sense


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,168 ✭✭✭ Rosahane


    Well said
    My thinking is this.I am right handed but have to shoot left handed(dont ask)
    So if I get a standard gun and a made to measure stock its easier to sell with the standard stock if I change guns
    Hope that makes sense

    You can get them from the factory in left handed - not just the cast of the stock but also the direction of opening of the top lever.

    When it comes time to sell - if ever, I think that a true left handed gun would hold its price better because of the scarcity value.

    However, if you'e naturally right handed but left master eye the fit of the gun is even more important than normally. You need to consider what barrel length will work best for you - if your 5'6" you will struggle with a 32" gun and would probably be better getting a 28". Similarly with stock length - if your short and plump rather than skinny and gangly you will be better suited with different stock lengths, cast and drop.

    Most people can learn to shoot reasonably well at clays with an ill-fitting gun when they can mount the gun and position their head and eye to look correctly along the barrel. However, this won't work with FITASC clay or game shooting where you just mount and shoot and the fit has to be reasonable.

    You are always going to shoot better with a gun that is fitted to you especially if you have to shoot of the "wrong" shoulder. However if you are of average height and build a factory stock in left hand is going to be reasonably OK.

    In summary, If you can afford it get the gun fitted for you with somebody that knows what they are doing and has a proper try gun to get the measurements correct it's the way to go.

    ...and the best of luck.


  • Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭ paulireland


    Thanks rosahane
    Sounds like solid advice
    I had a gun permit years ago and shot a .22 so using my left shoulder and trigger with my left hand is fine for me even though I am right handed
    I have heard that as I had a permit before(1970s) it will help in getting a new permit now
    Good to know the lever is for left hand.I didnt know that
    Thanks for the advice


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    Thanks rosahane
    Sounds like solid advice
    I had a gun permit years ago and shot a .22 so using my left shoulder and trigger with my left hand is fine for me even though I am right handed
    I have heard that as I had a permit before(1970s) it will help in getting a new permit now
    Good to know the lever is for left hand.I didnt know that
    Thanks for the advice

    Problem is though using a rifle and a shotgun are apples and oranges. You can get a crossover stock made, so you can shoot from your right hand side and use your left eye.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,168 ✭✭✭ Rosahane


    tudderone wrote: »
    Problem is though using a rifle and a shotgun are apples and oranges. You can get a crossover stock made, so you can shoot from your right hand side and use your left eye.


    I don't know if crossover stock is an option. It's a lot of work to make one and involves modifications to the action of the gun as well as the stock as you can see in the picture. I've only ever seen one and I'm not sure if anyone makes them anymore. I'd expect to get fitted for one you would have to go to one of the top UK gunsmiths and go for a full custom made gun.

    A cross over stock is a beast to use and the felt recoil is huge because of the torquing effect of the recoil not being in the plane of the stock. It's also pretty hard on the cheek if it's mounted even slightly wrong. OK for a bit of game shooting but would be pretty uncomfortable for a few rounds of clays.

    I know a good few people who have learned to shoot off the "other" shoulder. My son is left handed and right eyed and he shoots to good effect off his right shoulder both shotgun and rifle. It does take a lot of practice but after a while the muscle memory kicks in and you're fine.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭ paulireland


    Uew that stock looks horrible
    I first shot when my dad had a gun when I was around 12 or so so I find using my left shoulder is perfectly natural for me.In fact to use my right shoulder feels wrong.Good news is a left hand gun will be fine for me
    I read through the permit form and see you have to buy a gun to apply for a permit
    Seems odd.What if you are refused.You would own a gun but couldn't have it
    Strange


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,168 ✭✭✭ Rosahane


    Uew that stock looks horrible
    I first shot when my dad had a gun when I was around 12 or so so I find using my left shoulder is perfectly natural for me.In fact to use my right shoulder feels wrong.Good news is a left hand gun will be fine for me
    I read through the permit form and see you have to buy a gun to apply for a permit
    Seems odd.What if you are refused.You would own a gun but couldn't have it
    Strange

    That's the beauty of our licensing laws. You have to work on the assumption that you won't be refused. Most dealers would have a minimum non refundable deposit of maybe 50 euro on a purchase. However, if they have to bring in a gun from abroad they will probably want full payment in advance. If you don't get the licence then they will try to sell it for you - might take a year or more.

    That said, in my opinion a Miroku is one of the best and easiest gun for resale and go for a viewing when possible. If you find it difficult to get a Miroku in the config you want look at a Browning or Beretta.

    Also, I presume you know which type of clay gun you are after - there is a big difference between a trap and sporting clay shotgun.

    Lastly, it might be worthwhile ringing around the dealers and seeing what they have in left hand, its worthwhile mounting different guns to see the difference between them!


  • Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭ paulireland


    Was thinking of trap so the mk38 looked ideal with the fixed chokes
    Can it be used for sporting clays
    I am a complete novice at clays so forgive the basic questions:D


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,168 ✭✭✭ Rosahane


    Was thinking of trap so the mk38 looked ideal with the fixed chokes
    Can it be used for sporting clays
    I am a complete novice at clays so forgive the basic questions:D

    Broadly speaking, a trap gun is pretty specific to Trap. You can shoot other disciplines with it but you will be fairly handicapped due to the point of Ain and the fixed chokes. You are better to but a 30" Sporter with multi chokes and an adjustable comb which will shoot any discipline.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,168 ✭✭✭ Rosahane


    Since you're in Wicklow head up to Hilltop when it re-opens and have a look at the clay layouts. You can see the difference between the Compact sporting and Ball trap layouts and see the different type of guns. He will have trap and sporting clay guns that you can look at to see the difference. You can even shoot when you're there.


  • Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭ paulireland


    Thanks for that.I didn't realize the trap gun had a fixed aim point.
    Am also trying to get my head around chokes


  • Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭ paulireland


    So either MK38 sport or MK70 sport
    What do you think


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,168 ✭✭✭ Rosahane


    So either MK38 sport or MK70 sport
    What do you think

    I'm not up to date on the current iterations of Miroku. Although I have one in 20G it's for my daughters and I shoot a Browning. It's a lovely gun though.

    The older MK38 were fixed choke Trap guns with a high comb. The MK 70 are a bit lighter and have invector chokes. I think you can now get a multi choke MK38.

    I think, given what you will be spending, and since it's likely to see you out you should visit dealers and look at the guns. Mount and swing them, see how the different models and barrel lengths feel. Given that they will be RH your eye won't fall naturally but, you may find that the stock on some (like the Brownings from the same stable) is virtually straight.

    Also get advice from the people you shoot with and in your club. Some are sure to have Mirokus. It's worthwhile also to seek out left hand Brownings and Berettas and see how they feel.

    That said, If I was getting one it would be the MK70 :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭ paulireland


    Sound advice
    I did a bit of checking and the MK38 has a multichoke version now
    I am not in a club yet but will check out when they re open
    The MK38 and MK70 look very similar on paper


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,168 ✭✭✭ Rosahane


    Sound advice
    I did a bit of checking and the MK38 has a multichoke version now
    I am not in a club yet but will check out when they re open
    The MK38 and MK70 look very similar on paper

    The difference is in the stock. The Mk38 stock will have a higher comb for trap which, when you mount the gun, will show a lot more rib. If you get an adjustable comb Mk70 you can replicate this for trap by raising the comb. I've seen Miroku with adjustable combs but don't know if this is a factory option. In any case you could get Pat Sludds to fit one for you or just use a stick on or elastic comb raiser.

    I said earlier that the difference between them is also in the weight but, being curious I looked it up and they are the same weight. I was mixing up the MK 70 and MK 60 which is lighter.

    If we keep this conversation up my wife will be suspicious, as you are getting me thinking, and I might be tempted bring home a nice Miroku that I got for a "bargain" price ;)


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