Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email Niamh on [email protected] for help. Thanks :)
New AMA with a US police officer (he's back!). You can ask your questions here

What book are you reading atm?? CHAPTER TWO

  • 26-03-2020 9:12pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 9,826 ✭✭✭ py2006


    Well now,

    Following on from the surprising interest and genuinely great contributions from so many on here in the first thread it finally reached its capacity.

    So I decided to create a fresh one and hopefully it will continue in the same vein and provide a great resource in the current climate too.

    Simple rules:
    1/ Title of Book
    2/ Author/s
    3/ Brief blurb on whats its about
    4/ Would ya recommend it.

    Thanks


    Link to Literary Forum for more indepth discussion of any books

    https://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/forumdisplay.php?f=19


«13456741

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 5,423 ✭✭✭ Berties_Horse


    'The Life Of Riley' by Anthony Cronin. A tragi-comedy about an unrepentent chancer's descent into drink-fuelled oblivion. Highly recommended for sparkling turn of phrase.


  • Registered Users Posts: 565 ✭✭✭ thefasteriwalk


    Last night I finished Coetzee’s ‘Waiting for the Barabrians.’ It’s my favourite of his works that I’ve read so far. Subtle but profound. Tonight I am starting Philip Roth’s alternative history ‘The Plot Against America.’ I’m looking forward to checking out the HBO adaptation when I’m finished.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,253 ✭✭✭✭ branie2


    Galway Girl, a Jack Taylor thriller, by Ken Bruen


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,863 ✭✭✭ mikhail


    Prisoners of Geography, Tim Marshall. It's reducing the foreign policy of various powers (Russia, China, US, so far) to a race to secure mountains, coasts, and navigable sea channels so they can't easily be attacked. Somewhat interesting, but feels a bit reductive.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,588 ✭✭✭✭ Hello 2D Person Below


    Dirty Wars: The World is a Battlefield written by Jeremy Scahill. It's about the covert wars that the United States has been fighting. Excellent read and a real eye opener, even for someone that has a particular low opinion of U.S regimes. I'm on my third reading of it and still learning more and more.


    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/15814204-dirty-wars


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 7,055 ✭✭✭ JohnnyFlash


    'The Life Of Riley' by Anthony Cronin. A tragi-comedy about an unrepentent chancer's descent into drink-fuelled oblivion. Highly recommended for sparkling turn of phrase.

    Sounds great, Bertie. I’ll have to give it a read.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,003 ✭✭✭ Quantum Erasure


    I'm still on chapter one... haven't finished whatever it was I was reading in the last thread


  • Registered Users Posts: 983 ✭✭✭ gutenberg


    Getting through Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel in anticipation of the new one. Read Wolf Hall last week. I'd forgotten how good they are, and I recall liking Bring Up the Bodies even more than Wolf Hall when I read it first, so let's see if it stands up to that...


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,459 ✭✭✭✭ The_Kew_Tour


    Max Hastings All Hell Let Loose about WW2 was enjoyable.

    Keeping with WW2 theme Hanns and Rudolf by Thomas Hardy was also decent.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,912 ✭✭✭ ArchXStanton


    Can anyone recommend a good Terry Pratchett book? I'm here putting in an amazon book order


  • Advertisement
  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 16,283 Mod ✭✭✭✭ quickbeam


    Mort.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,863 ✭✭✭ mikhail


    Mort is a good place to start - I think it's the first of the books that focus on the anthropomorphic Death.

    I'm fond of Guards! Guards! too, which is the start of the Night Watch stories, which are my favourite of the strands that run through the series. In a city where crime has been legalised (and given quotas - the city's dictator is delightfully Machiavellian), the Night Watch is a defunct organisation, staffed by imbeciles and run by a jaded if capable alcoholic. The boss is always depicted in the cover art as a sort of Clint Eastwood type - possibly in reaction to the watch motto - Fabricas Diem, Pvnk. Their idealistic new recruit may be the rightful heir to the throne, and there's a plot to overthrow the dictator and install someone worse. Pratchett wrote it after thinking about the guys they always yelled for in the old movies - "Guards! Guards!"

    Of the relatively stand-alone books, I adored Thief of Time. Just to give you a flavour, the lead character is a monk who practices "deja fu", which is a martial art that leaves one with the impression that one has been kicked in the head that way before. His order seems to be modelled on the Buddhists, but they worship, protect, and manipulate time. In spite of that, he derives his philosophy in life from the aphorisms of his old landlady, which he has collected in a little notebook. Lines like, "If you keep picking at that, it'll never heal" are treated with reverence. It's simultaneously sweet and funny, and a great send-up of religion. It's a fun adventure too.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,633 ✭✭✭ andekwarhola


    Lines In The Sand - AA Gill


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,278 ✭✭✭ Your Face


    I'm a few chapters into Napoleon the Great by Andrew Roberts.

    Really like it so far.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,414 ✭✭✭ EmmetSpiceland


    'The Life Of Riley' by Anthony Cronin. A tragi-comedy about an unrepentent chancer's descent into drink-fuelled oblivion. Highly recommended for sparkling turn of phrase.

    Have you ever read ‘No Time for Work’ by George Ryan, B? Well worth a look if you haven’t.

    He/him/his

    “When you're used to privilege, equality feels like oppression”.

    #bekind



  • Registered Users Posts: 534 ✭✭✭ Tigerbaby


    Can anyone recommend a good Terry Pratchett book? I'm here putting in an amazon book order

    A, Just finished my ( 3rd or 4th !!) re-read of all the discworld books, and I also loved the Night Watch and Death books.

    However, as a stand-alone book, I found "Small Gods" one of his best.

    On a similar seam of writing, I am in the middle of reading Walter Moers Zamonia series of books. Buy the actual books, not kindle, as the illustrations within are essential to the stories.

    Moers is ( almost) up there with Pratchett for inventiveness, fun and sheer craziness.

    enjoy


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,502 ✭✭✭✭ eviltwin


    Reading The Testaments by Margaret Atwood. It's a great book but I think I need something a bit lighthearted at the moment. Nothing too heavy. Someone recommended David Sedaris, anyone familiar with his work?


  • Registered Users Posts: 28,846 ✭✭✭✭ Tauriel


    I finished I Know A Secret today by Tess Gerritsen and thus the Rizzoli & Isles series. I quite enjoyed it and a bit sad that this is the end for the crime fighting duo.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,414 ✭✭✭ EmmetSpiceland


    ‘The Planets’ by Dava Sobel.

    A nice little read, gives a little history, mythology and social/cultural “background” of the solar system.

    Don’t expect a “hard” science textbook or, if you’re a Sobel fan, maybe don’t expect the same “impact” as ‘Longitude’ but it’s still enjoyable.

    He/him/his

    “When you're used to privilege, equality feels like oppression”.

    #bekind



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,056 ✭✭✭ ablelocks


    Night Boat to Tangier, Kevin Barry.

    not quite City of Bohane, but really good


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 1,648 ✭✭✭ Nigel Fairservice


    I'm reading State by State: A Panoramic Portrait of America. It's an interesting anthology piece where authors talk about their impressions of one of the 50 US states, try to give us a sense of place and give context to what each state means to them on a personal level. It's a mixed bag with some contributors doing it better than others. There's some nice contributions from Rick Moody and Dave Eggers.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,863 ✭✭✭ mikhail


    I'm reading State by State: A Panoramic Portrait of America. It's an interesting anthology piece where authors talk bout their impressions of one of the 50 US states, try to give us a sense of place and give context to what each state means to them on a personal level. It's a mixed bag with some contributors doing it better than others. There's some nice contributions from Rick Moody and Dave Eggers.
    Eggers has a interesting autobiography called A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius. He lost both parents to cancer and wound up a twenty-something-year-old guardian of his little brother, 13 years his junior. It was a finalist for the Pulitzer.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,633 ✭✭✭ Danger781


    Finished Station Eleven. Not a huge fan if I'm honest. Left me feeling like the book had unfulfilled potential. Not enough focus on the post-apocalyptic elements of the story and far too much focus on the backstory of insignificant characters.

    Started reading Sam Harris' book Waking Up. Not an easy read so far even though I've just started.


  • Registered Users Posts: 28,846 ✭✭✭✭ Tauriel


    I've just finished The Last Templar by Raymond Khoury and really enjoyed this first of five novels in the Sean Reilly series.

    The Vatican lend some of their prized artifacts, which are normally hidden deep within the Vatican vaults, to the Met in New York for display. On the opening night, four horseman raid the Met leaving a trail of destruction and death in their wake.

    In comes FBI agent Sean Reilly to investigate the case alongside an archaeologist that was in attendance at the raid and a Vatican representative. Soon it becomes clear that the motive behind the raid is not a straightforward robbery but something much more sinister, that the Catholic Church would kill to keep secret.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,253 ✭✭✭✭ branie2


    The Guardians, the latest John Grisham thriller


  • Registered Users Posts: 28,846 ✭✭✭✭ Tauriel


    Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl.

    Another one of the books recommended by the Auschwitz Memorial that I decided to read. Unfortunately this particular book wasn't my cup of tea, I couldn't wait to finish it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 946 ✭✭✭ TheRepentent


    Currently reading Fatherland by Richard Harris (good so far , surprised I hadn't read it before).

    Also reading (and would be a great cure for insomniacs) the Blitzkrieg Legend...the bundeswehrs analysis of the 1940 panzer campaign in the west. Good but only if military history is your thing :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,742 ✭✭✭ Foweva Awone


    I've started into "An Astronaut's Guide To Life", a memoir by Chris Hadfield. He mentions that his earnestness is a bit of a joke to his children. And he really does come across as very earnest, idealistic, on the verge of preachy. That aside, it's a good read - he's an astronaut, how could it not be interesting!


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,290 ✭✭✭✭ Thargor


    Took a punt on the Chivalry series by Christian Cameron:

    https://www.goodreads.com/series/132815-chivalry

    And its great. Young English squire heads off to war in France to make his fortune, reads a lot like Emperor by Conn Iggulden. Couldnt have come at a better time either, bored all day at work then bored all evening at home. He has a Greek series and a Roman series and Im just going to grab them now aswell because Im tearing through the first series.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 4,633 ✭✭✭ andekwarhola


    I am Charlotte Simmons by Tom Wolfe.


Advertisement