Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on hello@boards.ie for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact hello@boards.ie

What will my child miss out on if they're not Christened?

Options
  • 20-03-2020 2:13pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 10 Dot34


    Hi guys,

    If this is already covered please do point me to the correct thread :)

    Myself and my other half (not married) are currently expecting out first wee human and are super excited. Both Catholics (by the actions of out parents) but not interested in any organised religion. I'd like to think there's more to the world than this, but I'm unable to believe in a god... I've tried.

    We have been chatting about christening and stuff and I'd like to ask you good people what it looks like to be a non-religious family trying to get a school place etc. Do you know if there are many non-religious kids in denominational primary schools?

    Just to be clear, neither of us want to have the baby Christened, ideally. We're just trying to figure this out ahead of all the pressure which we know is coming in a matter of time, probably mostly from my side of the family


«1

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 6,283 ✭✭✭fixXxer


    None of my 3 are christened. They go to a local catholic school as it was the only option available to us. I was up front with the school when applying and apart from the principle wanting a chat we've not had any problems. The kids are not separated from the rest during religious parts so they pick up some of the woo. We talk about it at home though so their heads are kept straight. 2nd class is a bloody chore though with all the communion stuff going on.


  • Posts: 13,688 Beau Red Zygote


    Catholic schools cannot prioritise catholic children over others. However minority faith schools (religions below 10%) can still prioritise children of certain faiths i.e protestant school can prioritse protestant children.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10 Dot34


    fixXxer wrote: »
    None of my 3 are christened. They go to a local catholic school as it was the only option available to us. I was up front with the school when applying and apart from the principle wanting a chat we've not had any problems. The kids are not separated from the rest during religious parts so they pick up some of the woo. We talk about it at home though so their heads are kept straight. 2nd class is a bloody chore though with all the communion stuff going on.

    That's really useful to know. Its completely uncharted territory for us. This will be a first grandchild on both sides and we have no-one paving the non-catholic way for us. I'd an idea that Catholic schools had to be more accommodating now, considering they're by and large the only option. We'll probably be living back home in Donegal in a few years and I think there's only 1 educate together primary school in the county... so its reassuring to know that.


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,931 ✭✭✭✭listermint


    Neither of ours are baptised. We had a humanist wedding ceremony. The whole church jazz isn't for us tbh. No specific reasons.

    Ours are under school age presently but when we phoned around for places it wasn't a problem in our local for any schools. South Wicklow.


  • Registered Users Posts: 62 ✭✭Gary Gurney


    Dot34 wrote: »
    Hi guys,

    If this is already covered please do point me to the correct thread :)

    Myself and my other half (not married) are currently expecting out first wee human and are super excited. Both Catholics (by the actions of out parents) but not interested in any organised religion. I'd like to think there's more to the world than this, but I'm unable to believe in a god... I've tried.

    We have been chatting about christening and stuff and I'd like to ask you good people what it looks like to be a non-religious family trying to get a school place etc. Do you know if there are many non-religious kids in denominational primary schools?

    Just to be clear, neither of us want to have the baby Christened, ideally. We're just trying to figure this out ahead of all the pressure which we know is coming in a matter of time, probably mostly from my side of the family

    Confirmation money


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 10 Dot34


    This is a genuine concern... lol


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 15,752 Mod ✭✭✭✭smacl


    Neither of my kids were Christened, nor was I myself for that matter. Both went to an ET primary and eldest went to a Catholic all girls secondary. I don't think it makes much difference these days unless you were looking to get them into a fee paying Jesuit school or similar. Even then, I'm guess most would quite probably still take your money. That said, we're Dublin based and Donegal could be a good bit more conservative,


  • Registered Users Posts: 34,847 ✭✭✭✭Hotblack Desiato


    They'll miss out on nothing and should gain some valuable life lessons on standing up for what you (don't) believe in :)

    We are two involuntary catholics, enrolled at birth into an organisation you can't officially leave but have had no time for since our teens, we got married in a registry office and neither of our kids are baptised and we wanted as non-religous an education for them as possible.

    No ET so we sent them to the local CoI primary (it is the nearest to our house!) and they are opted out of religion. It's been mostly OK, one teacher was a bit OTT in pushing the religion / marking out those who were not CoI and we had to have a word with the principal but it was sorted out.

    CoI kids are very much a minority in the school and it seems in the last couple of years they're ramping up the religion as a result - they have an evangelical guy in now every year for a couple of weeks to yap at the senior classes - "Fun Bible Guy" we call him :) again we just opt out, and the kids regard the whole religion thing as a big joke

    Secondary is actually a bigger issue where we live, large Dublin suburb but there are only two secondary schools:

    - a large single--sex girls secondary run by a catholic religious order with a history of child abuse
    - a large single--sex boys secondary run by a catholic religious order with a history of child abuse

    So as we're not fans of either religious orders or single-sex education (or child abuse) they're out. We have got a place for our elder child in a co-ed ET/joint patronage although we're outside the catchment area, the younger will get in there on the sibling rule. They still don't have a permanent premises though and are sharing with another school at the moment, their plan is to put pre-fabs on the grounds of the first school while the second is built...

    Fingal County Council are certainly not competent to be making decisions about the most important piece of infrastructure on the island. They need to stick to badly designed cycle lanes and deciding on whether Mrs Murphy can have her kitchen extension.



  • Registered Users Posts: 15,457 ✭✭✭✭Kylta


    Also baptism money and communion money.


  • Registered Users Posts: 34,847 ✭✭✭✭Hotblack Desiato


    Baptism money :mad: my parents were holding out on me!!!

    Fingal County Council are certainly not competent to be making decisions about the most important piece of infrastructure on the island. They need to stick to badly designed cycle lanes and deciding on whether Mrs Murphy can have her kitchen extension.



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 10 Dot34


    Kylta wrote: »
    Also baptism money and communion money.

    Yeah, I see your missed baptism money and raise you a secular naming ceremony...


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,351 ✭✭✭KaneToad


    We are two involuntary catholics, enrolled at birth into an organisation you can't officially leave but have had no time for since our teens...

    Surely you don't identity as catholic in any Census? If so, why do you give a monkeys that you can't "officially" leave the Catholic church? Its not like they're charging a membership fee!


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,645 ✭✭✭krissovo


    I will be honest its horrible for the child leading up to communion, my daughter was in tears for months when she could not engage in the class craic for what dress, shoes, how are you doing your hair. In our school peer pressure from the class, teacher and even the principle does not support a non catholic child. We ended up getting her and my younger son baptized a couple of weeks before her confirmation in a private session but that took a lot of negotiation with the Parrish to come to a reasonable agreement.


  • Registered Users Posts: 112 ✭✭CaoinDory


    Dot34 wrote: »
    Yeah, I see your missed baptism money and raise you a secular naming ceremony...

    Love this!!!


  • Posts: 18,749 ✭✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    krissovo wrote: »
    I will be honest its horrible for the child leading up to communion, my daughter was in tears for months when she could not engage in the class craic for what dress, shoes, how are you doing your hair. In our school peer pressure from the class, teacher and even the principle does not support a non catholic child. We ended up getting her and my younger son baptized a couple of weeks before her confirmation in a private session but that took a lot of negotiation with the Parrish to come to a reasonable agreement.

    Jaysis
    Could you not just let her go buy a fancy dress & take her out for the day anyway!
    Getting her baptised seems a bit ott for a child who thinks their missing something!


  • Registered Users Posts: 797 ✭✭✭Tiercel Dave


    Both my girls, now in their 20's, 5yrs between them, were not baptised and attended the local Catholic national school, East Galway. I went to the principal before first one was enrolled and stated my case. While I had no objection to them being exposed to a Christian ethos, after all, he was a good man, I didn't want them having Catholic dogma forced on them until they were old enough to decide things for themselves.
    As they progressed through schooling, at teachers meeting etc., I was told they were very behaved, courteous and so on, which to me were more important attributes. One nun, who I thought would be my biggest hurdle, was effusive in her praise of them both, saying they picked up on the prayers even though they were assigned other lessons during 'religion'.
    Come communion/confirmation we bought them special outfits and brought them to the latter part of the church ceremonies to meet with their classmates on their big day, then off for an adventure, shopping, cinema or whatever so it wasn't a day that they felt totally different or left out.....


  • Registered Users Posts: 34,847 ✭✭✭✭Hotblack Desiato


    KaneToad wrote: »
    Surely you don't identity as catholic in any Census? If so, why do you give a monkeys that you can't "officially" leave the Catholic church? Its not like they're charging a membership fee!

    No, but I'd be perfectly entitled to tick the catholic box if I chose to (and a lot of people seem to think that if baptised into a religion, that's what you should do, regardless of your actual beliefs), and that church still regards me as a catholic, and both of the above remain the case unless I were to join another church.

    Same as teachers don't give out to muslim kids for not going to the school mass, but they do to non-religious kids of Irish appearance because they assume their parents are just lazy catholics... non-belief is not a position respected by either the RCC or our society

    While I had no objection to them being exposed to a Christian ethos

    Just as well - because you'd have no option in many places.

    Why can't schools just be schools? That is what happens in normal developed countries.

    Fingal County Council are certainly not competent to be making decisions about the most important piece of infrastructure on the island. They need to stick to badly designed cycle lanes and deciding on whether Mrs Murphy can have her kitchen extension.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3 LLR


    Hi I realise I am 2 years late to this thread but wondering if anyone has any experience on this. I have a 3 month old and we are currently discussing christening. I only want to get her christened because I don't want her to be left out in school. Especially in the lead up to communion. I think like most people I would like to do it as tradition however the more I think about it the more I think maybe I don't want to. My partner is very against having her christened. I am hearing talk of communion and confirmation being taken out of school. If this happens that would be my decision made, but I really am afraid my baby will be left out in school. Does anyone have any insight?



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 15,752 Mod ✭✭✭✭smacl


    Neither of mine were christened, but both were lucky enough to end up in Educate Together primary schools. My feeling is this is becoming less of an issue over time and that if this is the only reason you would get your children Christened it is the wrong one. That said, if you don't care much either way, it could be a pragmatic decision. I'd tend to have a chat with your partner and discuss what other future religious ceremonies they are keen on beyond Christening (e.g. confirmation etc...) and make sure you're on the same page there. Christening won't impact your negatively daughter whereas the decision to continue to raise her as Christian may do.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,860 ✭✭✭Pissy Missy


    My friend has her children christened to avoid difficulties with accessing certain schools, I would research your local schools and views on this first



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 196 ✭✭JimmyAlfonso


    There are some alternatives out there so your kids don't feel left out like My Little Big Day (on religious, non profit, ceremony for children in Second Class.)

    My kids are just pre school so have not first hand knowledge but it looks to be a growing and complimentary experience so kids don't feel left out.


    I'm sure there are other events and you could just do a special day out like others have mentioned.



  • Registered Users Posts: 34,847 ✭✭✭✭Hotblack Desiato


    RC ethos schools are legally prohibited from discriminating in enrolment between baptised and non-baptised kids.

    IF in about 8 years' time communion prep is still happening in schools and IF you and your partner are both OK with it you can always have the child baptised at that stage.

    Your child's wishes should enter into it too, but the RCC knows what it's doing and if a nice outfit and a big day out and desire to fit in isn't enough to draw a little child in there's always a nice big cash bribe. This organisation portrays itself as the arbiter of our society's morals...

    TBH I can't see the current farce lasting much longer, ever increasing numbers of teachers and parents are completely fed up with it and the RCC is finally cottoning on that it doesn't work anyway. The vast majority of kids who show up on the two big days are never seen inside a church again. There are increasing calls from within the clergy to move it to a parish level instead of in schools. So those parents who are actually engaged with it can continue to participate and everyone else just gets on with their lives.

    The suggestion of an alternative nice outfit / big day out / cash bribe(!) thing is probably a good one. Not something we had to engage with in a CoI school, these sacraments happen MUCH later and are at parish level and don't involve the school - most kids in the school aren't CoI anyway.

    Fingal County Council are certainly not competent to be making decisions about the most important piece of infrastructure on the island. They need to stick to badly designed cycle lanes and deciding on whether Mrs Murphy can have her kitchen extension.



  • Registered Users Posts: 34,847 ✭✭✭✭Hotblack Desiato


    That form of discrimination has been illegal for a few years now but it seems many parents are still under the misapprehension that the old rules are still in place.

    Even then, there were hardly any RC schools applying the "baptism barrier" but the fear of it was enough to get lots of parents baptising who otherwise wouldn't. At every level, religions thrive on fear.

    Would love to know what baptism rates are like over the last few years, gone over a cliff would be my estimate. Fewer than half of all marriages in Ireland are now church weddings so these future parents are hardly likely to be at the head of the baptism queue.

    Fingal County Council are certainly not competent to be making decisions about the most important piece of infrastructure on the island. They need to stick to badly designed cycle lanes and deciding on whether Mrs Murphy can have her kitchen extension.



  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Education Moderators Posts: 27,196 CMod ✭✭✭✭spurious


    It used to be possible to formally leave and be removed from the baptismal register, but then they stopped allowing it as so many people were doing it. I officially left and have the letter from the bishop to prove it.



  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 49,526 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    i just find the notion of going to a ceremony like that and swearing to raise your child as catholic, when you don't seem to have any intention to, to be a little weird; just so they won't miss out on a party seven or eight years away. would you not feel like a total fraud?



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 15,752 Mod ✭✭✭✭smacl


    Not sure any baby is going to miss out on not being Christened. Communion, confirmation etc... is something altogether different and, in my opinion, something to most definitely avoid if you're not religious. Seems obvious, but many still get pressured into it. That said, as an atheist there was no way I would have got my kids Christened either. More importantly, we put a lot of effort to avoid Christian ethos schools and were lucky enough that ET weren't quite so oversubscribed when mine were at that stage. I would have had a serious issue sending the kids to a primary school with a strong Christian ethos, much as I imagine many Christians would in sending their kids to a school with a strong Muslim ethos. This is not a criticism of Christian or Muslim ethe, merely that they are somewhat incompatible with the ethos which we chose to raise our kids.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,593 ✭✭✭theteal


    Has the tide not turned yet in Ireland? I'd assume in this day and age, the group of "pagan" kids should be quite sizable. . . .maybe urban/rural variations?

    Not a chance I'd do if we were still around. Your child will learn more from standing ground and likely respect you more when they're older for not following the mindless done thing.

    For the record, our two are Sasanachs with funny foreign accents. No mention of religion in school apart from the nativity play. . . .I can't say the same for Queen/Royal family force feeding though - that jubilee period was tough.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3 LLR


    Oh I'm sorry did you read my comment? Did I mention anything about a party? I said I would have her christened so she would not be left out in school.. it seems nothing has changed since I was in school many moons ago, my friend is a primary school teacher and has said 2nd class is a nightmare for kids that are not making their communion. It's all about that!

    It seems everyone is still going along with the old tradition. Majority of people in my area / friends / family are still having kids christened and not attending church.

    Anyway I asked the question to find out if all schools were exclusive to kids not making communion / confirmation.

    I think majority of parents would agree it should he taken out of the schools, that way nobody would feel the pressure!



  • Registered Users Posts: 3 LLR


    It's not really the day in particular I'm talking about as I could go get her a dress and have a party if that's what we wanted on the day. I mean the whole lead up to it and preparation of it in class.

    Thanks though



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 1,141 ✭✭✭Gru


    honestly it depends on the school,


    in my kids school children not making their communion/confirmation are allowed do as much or as little as they (or their parents) want. If they don't do a reading at the confirmation they do one at the graduation instead, etc one child recently did the whole lot bar the official bits, and so hasn't made their communion officially but participated in all aspects of the build up and during the ceremony.

    the communion party has always included every child in the class although some miss out on it because their parent throw them a special day the same day in an outdoor pursuits centre or the likes. They still get the cards with money for those that way inclined. Naming ceremony's, celebration ceremonies and New Name/Teenage/confirm ceremonies are a thing now (where they add a confirmation name but don't get confirmed) .

    Regardless of religion or school ethos, put their name down as soon as you are able to as they can fill up fast and if your child isn't baptised that might come into play, but generally its "when" their name goes down that i've seen used as a barometer.



Advertisement