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Perkins Engine Frost Plug

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  • 18-03-2020 9:45pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 2,370 ✭✭✭


    Hi All,

    Looking for some expertise on perkins engines, I have a 4.236 in the boat.
    I had some issues with the starter lately and removed it to get it looked at.
    The gent I gave it to reckoned water was getting into it from inside the engine and mentioned to have a look and see was the frost plug leaking!

    Does anyone know where it might be located or have experience with replacing one if it is leaking?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 876 ✭✭✭ITman88


    Skuxx wrote: »
    Hi All,

    Looking for some expertise on perkins engines, I have a 4.236 in the boat.
    I had some issues with the starter lately and removed it to get it looked at.
    The gent I gave it to reckoned water was getting into it from inside the engine and mentioned to have a look and see was the frost plug leaking!

    Does anyone know where it might be located or have experience with replacing one if it is leaking?

    Post this in the farming or plant section as well , it’s an engine in a plethora of tractors particularly MF 2 and 3 series


  • Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 6,327 Mod ✭✭✭✭fergal.b


    Should be easy enough to spot it's a round brass disc like this but might have been painted over if it is leaking you will probably see a trail of rust running down the engine block, there are some pic's in this link and a handy bit of reading http://www.moteur-perkins.com/uploads/catalogue/lettre/notice/manuel-perkins-ld-4-236.pdf



    mf65203perkinsblockheaterlocation_zpsilvay1gb.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,370 ✭✭✭Skuxx


    Hi Fergal,

    Thanks for chipping in. Should all the freeze plugs be accessible on the external surface of the block or is there a chance they could be hidden inside requiring some disassembly of the engine?


  • Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 6,327 Mod ✭✭✭✭fergal.b


    Skuxx wrote: »
    Hi Fergal,

    Thanks for chipping in. Should all the freeze plugs be accessible on the external surface of the block or is there a chance they could be hidden inside requiring some disassembly of the engine?

    You should be able to get at most of them handy enough they are all on the external part of the block and are designed to blow out if the block freezes and prevent the block from cracking, I don't know this engine but it is possible you have some plugs behind the flywheel that are dripping down into the bell housing and then into the starter.


    7569_3_zpssqmhcq7m.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,370 ✭✭✭Skuxx


    fergal.b wrote: »
    I don't know this engine but it is possible you have some plugs behind the flywheel that are dripping down into the bell housing and then into the starter.

    That's my thinking too unfortunately! Not sure now when I'll get out to have a look at it next but I'll keep the thread updated!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 516 ✭✭✭10pennymixup


    They're a common enough engine as others said but I don't know them. But with some engines yes, core/ frost plugs require you taking pieces off to get at them. I had to take the water jacket off a Volvo Penta before to get at one on its underside which meant taking off quite a few other things as well. Spent a full day putting it all back together.

    Core plugs can be made of brass and mild steel and are often painted over. The offending one is usually spotted by tracing the rusty drip the leak leaves as Fergal says. Some good vid's on youtube etc on how to replace.

    If it's not a core plug leaking, could it be a build up bilge water seeping into the bell housing and the flywheel bringing it to the starter?

    Either way if there is still water in the bell housing, soon as the engine turns the flywheel will bring it back on to the starter again. It will need to be drained somehow.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,370 ✭✭✭Skuxx


    If it's not a core plug leaking, could it be a build up bilge water seeping into the bell housing and the flywheel bringing it to the starter?

    Either way if there is still water in the bell housing, soon as the engine turns the flywheel will bring it back on to the starter again. It will need to be drained somehow.

    So just a quick update, it seems this is the problem. I got the starter fixed and installed it, ran the engine and removed the starter again only to find water on the starter and the flywheel!

    I was thinking to buy an oil syphon pump you'd use for servicing the car and put it into the opening where the starter would be. This is the only way I can think to remove the majority of the water without having to do any heavy disassembly work.

    Open to suggestions and ideas if someone has some experience!


  • Registered Users Posts: 516 ✭✭✭10pennymixup


    Skuxx wrote: »
    So just a quick update, it seems this is the problem. I got the starter fixed and installed it, ran the engine and removed the starter again only to find water on the starter and the flywheel!

    I was thinking to buy an oil syphon pump you'd use for servicing the car and put it into the opening where the starter would be. This is the only way I can think to remove the majority of the water without having to do any heavy disassembly work.

    Open to suggestions and ideas if someone has some experience!

    Not knowing your engine, I'm not saying that you should do this, it's up to you.

    I have in the past drilled the bell housing at it's lowest point to let it drain. Then closed the hole with a very short self tapper. It was difficult to get at but with an angle attachment to the drill it was possible.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,370 ✭✭✭Skuxx


    Not knowing your engine, I'm not saying that you should do this, it's up to you.

    I have in the past drilled the bell housing at it's lowest point to let it drain. Then closed the hole with a very short self tapper. It was difficult to get at but with an angle attachment to the drill it was possible.

    Thats certainly something that did cross my mind and would be something I'd try if it meant I could avoid removing the bellhousing! I had a look to see was there some sort of drain plug already there but I didnt see anything obvious and the access is quite poor!! The engine is a Perkins 4236.


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