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Too much thought of GAA Players

  • 06-03-2020 3:36pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 21 ✭✭✭ mammyod
    Registered User


    I think their is way too much thought of GAA players.


    Why is a GAA player who plays well often publicly referred to as a hero? (tv / radio / papers etc)

    Why is a retired GAA player often publicly referred to as a legend?

    Dont get me wrong - I think the GAA is great.

    Great for getting a community together - for those interested in GAA.

    Great for kids, who are interested in GAA.

    I played myself when I was young, and was very good at it. Enjoyed it immensely.

    But, had to move away to better myself, no jobs at home, went to collage etc.


    Some people could manage to keep playing - worked for their parents maybe, or very lucky to find work near home. Great for them, No problems with that.

    But , why are these people now often referred to as legends? Many still living with, or very close to mammy and daddy, working on parents business usually.

    Why are they called hero's for playing well.

    What about the kids who are good at say, art, or drama, or like reading? No one is publicly calling them "heros", and rightly so. Its not fair on them to be making so much of those who are into GAA.


    What about the young person who's made a life for themselves elsewhere, got themselves well educated, good job - no one is publicly calling them "Legends", and rightly so. Standing on there own 2 feet, and not easy getting there .

    GAA - its a game, with a ball, running around a field . . . all very good - but no need for it to be taking over, and so much in our face!!! There's other things out there, other interests.


    :confused::confused::rolleyes::P
    Tagged:


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,130 ✭✭✭ correction
    Registered User


    It sounds like there's something personal here and you are very bitter about it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21 ✭✭✭ mammyod
    Registered User


    correction wrote: »
    It sounds like there's something personal here and you are very bitter about it.
    I knew someone here would reply saying that!

    nope - not bitter at all . its just a very clear observation.

    Anyone living in rural Ireland will understand what im talking about.

    Iv no reason to be bitter - but definitely way too much made of these "Hero's and Legends" . Its just a fact! Watching my 3 boys growing up, now in there teens, not interested in GAA (but interested in other sports), and having to put up with and watch this carry on every weekend.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,526 ✭✭✭ ArielAtom
    Registered User


    mammyod wrote: »
    I knew someone here would reply saying that!

    nope - not bitter at all . its just a very clear observation.

    Anyone living in rural Ireland will understand what im talking about.

    Iv no reason to be bitter - but definitely way too much made of these "Hero's and Legends" . Its just a fact! Watching my 3 boys growing up, now in there teens, not interested in GAA (but interested in other sports), and having to put up with and watch this carry on every weekend.


    You or your lads don't have to put up with or look at anything. If it's on TV, just move to a different channel. What sports are they into?


  • Registered Users Posts: 21 ✭✭✭ mammyod
    Registered User


    ArielAtom wrote: »
    You or your lads don't have to put up with or look at anything. If it's on TV, just move to a different channel. What sports are they into?


    Im not against the GAA at all, nor are any of my boys. We all watch the matches, both on the tv and go to local games. its great, and like watching GAA .

    But . . . .what my post is saying - why are the players referred to as heros and legends. Its just a sport. no one using these terms in other sports!


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,526 ✭✭✭ ArielAtom
    Registered User


    mammyod wrote: »
    Im not against the GAA at all, nor are any of my boys. We all watch the matches, both on the tv and go to local games. its great, and like watching GAA .

    But . . . .what my post is saying - why are the players referred to as heros and legends. Its just a sport. no one using these terms in other sports!


    OK, So really you've little to be worrying about. You have stated that your boys are involved in other sports, how do you fit the time with three teenagers to go all the local games and fit in thier sports, some man for one man I say.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 170 ✭✭ jackwigan
    Registered User


    mammyod wrote: »
    Im not against the GAA at all, nor are any of my boys. We all watch the matches, both on the tv and go to local games. its great, and like watching GAA .

    But . . . .what my post is saying - why are the players referred to as heros and legends. Its just a sport. no one using these terms in other sports!

    But mammyod...this...this just isn't true. So very untrue. Straight up false. Wrong. Incorrect. You do know that right? Right!?


  • Registered Users Posts: 21 ✭✭✭ mammyod
    Registered User


    ArielAtom wrote: »
    OK, So really you've little to be worrying about. You have stated that your boys are involved in other sports, how do you fit the time with three teenagers to go all the local games and fit in thier sports, some man for one man I say.

    never said we go to all the matches - i said we all go to matches. local pitch across the road from us!

    not worried about it at all ArielAtom, just stating a point!


  • Registered Users Posts: 20 ✭✭✭ Vangoghslow
    Registered User


    Yes, all the players I've ever played with were so lucky to live with Mammy and Daddy and work in the family business around the corner from the GAA field.

    It's sad really that they couldn't better themselves by going off to college and standing on their own two feet.

    I have even heard of some men and women who are so committed to their clubs and county that they travel long distances from work and college just to go training....haha...if anything I'd call them losers.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,759 ✭✭✭ blowitupref
    Registered User


    Gaeilge amateur players well deserve their hero' and Legend status as far as I'm concerned.

    These are fellas that put their lives on hold for the love of their club and county teams. Playing for your county is a huge commitment and it's a pet hate of mine when I see people criticising players for taking a year out.

    In comparison across the water in the EPL many players are millionaires by the time they reach 20 and they express their love for their team by kissing their teams badges when they score, yet many of the same fellas show little loyalty as money is king in that sport.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,878 ✭✭✭✭ endacl
    Registered User


    OP could have been county.

    :(


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  • Registered Users Posts: 21 ✭✭✭ mammyod
    Registered User


    Gaeilge amateur players well deserve their hero' and Legend status as far as I'm concerned..

    Dont agree. Great players / sportsperson , yes


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,759 ✭✭✭ blowitupref
    Registered User


    mammyod wrote: »
    Dont agree. Great players / sportsperson , yes

    You don't have to agree I have my opinion on GAA players and nothing will change it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21 ✭✭✭ mammyod
    Registered User


    You don't have to agree I have my opinion on GAA players and nothing will change it.

    ya thats fine - im just telling you i dont agree!


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,927 ✭✭✭ xieann
    Registered User


    Hope no All Stars feelings hurt in this thread! ;-D


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,248 ✭✭✭ twowheelsonly
    Registered User


    Gaeilge amateur players well deserve their hero' and Legend status as far as I'm concerned.

    These are fellas that put their lives on hold for the love of their club and county teams. Playing for your county is a huge commitment and it's a pet hate of mine when I see people criticising players for taking a year out.

    In comparison across the water in the EPL many players are millionaires by the time they reach 20 and they express their love for their team by kissing their teams badges when they score, yet many of the same fellas show little loyalty as money is king in that sport.


    Why the comparison with the EPL ?
    Why not compare with local boxing, athletics, rugby etc. ? Does it always have to come down to soccer comparisons, where, BTW, not a whole lot of fellas are millionaires by 20 in the whole scheme of things. American football, basketball and baseball would have a lot more young millionaires.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,967 ✭✭✭✭ The Lost Sheep


    mammyod wrote: »
    I think their is way too much thought of GAA players.

    Why is a GAA player who plays well often publicly referred to as a hero? (tv / radio / papers etc)

    Why is a retired GAA player often publicly referred to as a legend?

    Dont get me wrong - I think the GAA is great.

    Great for getting a community together - for those interested in GAA.

    Great for kids, who are interested in GAA.

    I played myself when I was young, and was very good at it. Enjoyed it immensely.

    But, had to move away to better myself, no jobs at home, went to collage etc.

    Some people could manage to keep playing - worked for their parents maybe, or very lucky to find work near home. Great for them, No problems with that.

    But , why are these people now often referred to as legends? Many still living with, or very close to mammy and daddy, working on parents business usually.

    Why are they called hero's for playing well.

    What about the kids who are good at say, art, or drama, or like reading? No one is publicly calling them "heros", and rightly so. Its not fair on them to be making so much of those who are into GAA.

    What about the young person who's made a life for themselves elsewhere, got themselves well educated, good job - no one is publicly calling them "Legends", and rightly so. Standing on there own 2 feet, and not easy getting there .

    GAA - its a game, with a ball, running around a field . . . all very good - but no need for it to be taking over, and so much in our face!!! There's other things out there, other interests.

    :confused::confused::rolleyes::P
    I think this is a very unfair post and is far from the truth. The building up of players, calling them heroes etc is not just in GAA but rugby, soccer and many other sports
    Why does it matter that sportspeople are considered heroes?


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,421 ✭✭✭ splinter65
    Registered User


    mammyod wrote: »
    I knew someone here would reply saying that!

    nope - not bitter at all . its just a very clear observation.

    Anyone living in rural Ireland will understand what im talking about.

    Iv no reason to be bitter - but definitely way too much made of these "Hero's and Legends" . Its just a fact! Watching my 3 boys growing up, now in there teens, not interested in GAA (but interested in other sports), and having to put up with and watch this carry on every weekend.

    In what way are you and your children having to “put up” with anything?
    Young people in your community play GAA and bring a massive sense of pride to the parish. People in the community get a huge amount of pleasure out of the success of the GAA club.
    So the team are feted as heroes and retired players are legends. They get a bit of superstar treatment around the town. So what? This happens all over the world.
    Your kids decided not to join the GAA club. I’m sure they enjoy themselves in other interests.
    Nobody is taking anything away from you and your kids. And here you are, a parent of teenagers, all eaten up with envy and resentment and begrudgery. Really? Take a long hard look at yourself because this is just sad. And by the way, you don’t know very much about other sports..there are hero’s and legends in every code.


  • Registered Users Posts: 876 ITman88
    Registered User


    I do like the GAA, great skill and dedication, but it’s all about the small town blues. The prime of your life physically dedicated to working and living where you came from.
    I live far from home now and am often jibed about being an outsider when I attend local matches where I now live. All light hearted tho


  • Registered Users Posts: 307 ✭✭ North of 32
    Registered User


    Football especially, as a mass-appeal sport in Ireland, does lead to a lot of adulation for successful players among the public. Generally I just say, fair play.

    I do have one bugbear - not with inter-county football/hurling but rather the media and its obsession with the number of hours squads spend training.

    There are amateur athletes in other sports who have been making similar sacrifices and investing just as much time for a lot longer and get none of the same coverage or appreciation.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,470 ✭✭✭✭ lawred2
    Registered User


    Weird thread..

    Going to school, getting a decent education and a career is called life. It's a basis for any normal functioning person.

    Whereas being at the pinnacle of your sport is not


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  • Registered Users Posts: 88 ✭✭ Deise_abu
    Registered User


    WUM


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,872 ✭✭✭ TheMilkyPirate
    Registered User


    mammyod wrote: »
    I think their is way too much thought of GAA players.


    Why is a GAA player who plays well often publicly referred to as a hero? (tv / radio / papers etc)

    Why is a retired GAA player often publicly referred to as a legend?

    Dont get me wrong - I think the GAA is great.

    Great for getting a community together - for those interested in GAA.

    Great for kids, who are interested in GAA.

    I played myself when I was young, and was very good at it. Enjoyed it immensely.

    But, had to move away to better myself, no jobs at home, went to collage etc.


    Some people could manage to keep playing - worked for their parents maybe, or very lucky to find work near home. Great for them, No problems with that.

    But , why are these people now often referred to as legends? Many still living with, or very close to mammy and daddy, working on parents business usually.

    Why are they called hero's for playing well.

    What about the kids who are good at say, art, or drama, or like reading? No one is publicly calling them "heros", and rightly so. Its not fair on them to be making so much of those who are into GAA.


    What about the young person who's made a life for themselves elsewhere, got themselves well educated, good job - no one is publicly calling them "Legends", and rightly so. Standing on there own 2 feet, and not easy getting there .

    GAA - its a game, with a ball, running around a field . . . all very good - but no need for it to be taking over, and so much in our face!!! There's other things out there, other interests.


    :confused::confused::rolleyes::P

    GAA players and contrary to what you have said yourself players of other sports are referred to as legends and heros because they bring immense joy to the people who follow them. Young people idolise them and rightly so. This is a very strange thread I have to say. Sports people have always been looked up to and admired and thats the way it will always be.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,439 ✭✭✭ Mysterypunter
    Registered User


    Local hero's for sure, aren't a lot of Irish rugby players referred to as hero's despite numerous disappointing results.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,329 ✭✭✭ FastFullBack
    Registered User


    Weird thread for sure. Sporting "legends" are everywhere in every sport. Not just a GAA thing. Of all the things to knock the GAA on this is odd.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,800 ✭✭✭ KaneToad
    Registered User


    lawred2 wrote: »
    Weird thread..

    Going to school, getting a decent education and a career is called life. It's a basis for any normal functioning person.

    Whereas being at the pinnacle of your sport is not

    I think the OP is suggesting that being at the pinnacle of GAA is not that great of an achievement. I would tend to agree. However, being lauded as a GAA hero can only exist if there are GAA fans to do the lauding. Of which there are plenty. Best of luck to them all.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,329 ✭✭✭ FastFullBack
    Registered User


    KaneToad wrote: »
    I think the OP is suggesting that being at the pinnacle of GAA is not that great of an achievement. I would tend to agree. However, being lauded as a GAA hero can only exist if there are GAA fans to do the lauding. Of which there are plenty. Best of luck to them all.

    But what's different from a GAA legend to any other sporting legend?

    Are you suggesting any sports man or woman at the top of their sport should not be seen as hero's or legend?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,625 ✭✭✭ Lefty Bicek
    Registered User


    mammyod wrote: »
    I think their is way too much thought of GAA players.


    Why is a GAA player who plays well often publicly referred to as a hero? (tv / radio / papers etc)

    Why is a retired GAA player often publicly referred to as a legend?

    Dont get me wrong - I think the GAA is great.

    Great for getting a community together - for those interested in GAA.

    Great for kids, who are interested in GAA.

    I played myself when I was young, and was very good at it. Enjoyed it immensely.

    But, had to move away to better myself, no jobs at home, went to collage etc.


    Some people could manage to keep playing - worked for their parents maybe, or very lucky to find work near home. Great for them, No problems with that.

    But , why are these people now often referred to as legends? Many still living with, or very close to mammy and daddy, working on parents business usually.

    Why are they called hero's for playing well.

    What about the kids who are good at say, art, or drama, or like reading? No one is publicly calling them "heros", and rightly so. Its not fair on them to be making so much of those who are into GAA.


    What about the young person who's made a life for themselves elsewhere, got themselves well educated, good job - no one is publicly calling them "Legends", and rightly so. Standing on there own 2 feet, and not easy getting there .

    GAA - its a game, with a ball, running around a field . . . all very good - but no need for it to be taking over, and so much in our face!!! There's other things out there, other interests.


    :confused::confused::rolleyes::P

    More GAA and less collage might have suited you better. Is that it ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,800 ✭✭✭ KaneToad
    Registered User


    But what's different from a GAA legend to any other sporting legend?

    Are you suggesting any sports man or woman at the top of their sport should not be seen as hero's or legend?

    The threshold to becoming the top of your sport, if your sport is GAA, is quite low - in my opinion. Although, I suppose it depends on what you consider the top of GAA is? But, who am I to suggest who people should consider heroes or legends. Each to their own.

    Edit: Apologies, have just realised this is the GAA forum. I thought it was AH. Will leave it to the GAA fans.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,625 ✭✭✭ Lefty Bicek
    Registered User


    I have no problem with the 'hero' thing, if you use it as a shorthand for describing someone who has immense skill in something that many others take great pleasure from, and whom you would like to emulate. Someone who you may even, as a youngster, wished you were, as you pretended to be Michéal ó hEithir.

    Or from someone who gains the reputation on the field of being courageous, or brave. Or who represent themselves well, their place, their county, on the field of play. Those things are somehow valourous. An old-fashioned word, but there's absolutely nothing wrong with it.

    What I do think is very unfair and unreasonable, is the 'role-model' thing that is now being increasingly attached.

    Camera-phones and social media. I hate them.

    Stupid OP, to be honest. Huge number of intercounty players now are collage-educated. Such is the commitment required.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,030 ✭✭✭ theoneeyedman
    Registered User


    mammyod wrote: »
    I think their is way too much thought of GAA players.


    Why is a GAA player who plays well often publicly referred to as a hero? (tv / radio / papers etc)

    Why is a retired GAA player often publicly referred to as a legend?

    Dont get me wrong - I think the GAA is great.

    Great for getting a community together - for those interested in GAA.

    Great for kids, who are interested in GAA.

    I played myself when I was young, and was very good at it. Enjoyed it immensely.

    But, had to move away to better myself, no jobs at home, went to collage etc.


    Some people could manage to keep playing - worked for their parents maybe, or very lucky to find work near home. Great for them, No problems with that.

    But , why are these people now often referred to as legends? Many still living with, or very close to mammy and daddy, working on parents business usually.

    Why are they called hero's for playing well.

    What about the kids who are good at say, art, or drama, or like reading? No one is publicly calling them "heros", and rightly so. Its not fair on them to be making so much of those who are into GAA.


    What about the young person who's made a life for themselves elsewhere, got themselves well educated, good job - no one is publicly calling them "Legends", and rightly so. Standing on there own 2 feet, and not easy getting there .

    GAA - its a game, with a ball, running around a field . . . all very good - but no need for it to be taking over, and so much in our face!!! There's other things out there, other interests.


    :confused::confused::rolleyes::P

    For someone who says there is too much thought of GAA players..... Well you certainly put a lot of thought into it yourself!


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