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Norweigian Infrastucture Compared to Irish

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  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    gjim wrote: »
    I said Ireland had been in relative economic decline. Given the fact that, uniquely in Europe, Ireland's population had been falling for the previous 70 years, "narrowing the wage gap with the GB" which is a per-capita measure does not invalidate that claim.

    I claimed Ireland had little over half of the GDP per head at the time of independence - you say this is incorrect it was 56%? I've no idea what your point is here - is 56% not "little over half"?

    And it feels like you're just looking for argument since I said nothing about the post-independence economy.

    You're changing the goalposts while being disingenuous but apparently I'm looking for an argument.

    "I said nothing about the post-independence economy, but used figures from post-independence to support ahistorical revisionist claims about pre-independence. I also meant absolute GDP rather than per capita, even though economics (and economists) always use per capita."

    K m8, valuable contribution thanks so much


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,529 ✭✭✭dubrov


    Norway's net emigration of Norwegian citizens in 2018 was 1,777 people on a population of 5.4million.


    It's net migration overall was 18,103 immigrants.


    Anecdotes are no replacement when official statistics are easily available.

    Could you link to the source?
    I am not doubting it is true but would like to see the details.


  • Registered Users Posts: 826 ✭✭✭hognef


    dubrov wrote: »
    Could you link to the source?
    I am not doubting it is true but would like to see the details.

    That ultimate source for that type of statistic will be Statistics Norway (Statistisk Sentralbyrå, SSB). The net migration figure, 18103, can be found here:

    https://www.ssb.no/innvandring-og-innvandrere/faktaside/innvandring

    That particular page doesn't appear to be available in English, but search for "Nettoinnvandring".

    The 1777 figure for emigration looks wrong. The line chart just above the 18103 figure on that page shows 2018 immigration of 52485 and emigration of 34382, indeed yielding a net inward migration of 18103.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,776 ✭✭✭CrabRevolution


    Norway only gained independence in 1905. It's economy performed terribly in the late 1800s and into the early 1900s as it was predominantly agriculture/fishing+timer+maritime shipping.

    Norway has fantastic natural resources, but aside from hydro they only really came into play post ww2.

    Ireland was never asset stripped, wasn't a colony, and wasn't 'ravaged' by any genocide

    Keep your ahistorical nonsense to me_ira on Reddit, and maybe try stick to actual facts on here?


    Ireland's economy was very strong in the period up until Independence - it was the economical policies & protectionism of the Irish governments that followed that decimated the Irish economy.


    As someone who travels to Norway (particularly Oslo) 8+ times a year, comparing anything about Ireland to Norway (or Dublin to Oslo) is just ludicrous.

    So what caused the emigration from Ireland at levels unseen in the rest of Europe from the 1840s until independence? Lifestyle choices?

    Ireland was by far the poorest and most neglected part of the UK.

    "History of the Commercial and Financial Relations between England and Ireland from the Period of the Restoration" by Alice Effie Murray was written in 1903 and as you'd guess is a comprehensive contemporary account of the Irish economy at the time. It details how much life (and the economy) had been getting worse for Ireland over the years.


    In the opening page discussing Irish nationalism: "Still, it is poverty that is at the root of the present troubles, the real reason why political agitation is so successful.....Free Trade, which gave cheap bread to English artisans, and an enormous impetus to the commercial prosperity of the country, only brought ruin to Irish industries and agriculture. Irish manufacturing industry still concentrates itself in the north, hardly spreading beyond certain districts; emigration has been draining Ireland of her population for more than half a century...."

    In Chapter 16 on the Irish economy: "...industrial life is spread over a much smaller area now than it was then, a smaller percentage of the population is employed in industrial pursuits, the many minor industries which flourished before the Union disappeared in the latter half of the nineteenth century, the smaller towns sank into decay, and Irish manufacturing industry became confined within strict limits."

    "It was inevitable that the depression of agriculture which followed the repeal of the Corn Laws, but which became more severe in the (eighteen) seventies, should fall with greater severity upon Ireland than it did upon Great Britain. It has, of course, produced the same effect in both countries, that is to say, it has drained the population from the rural districts to the towns. Only in England the drain has been merely to the English towns, whereas in Ireland the rural population have emigrated to the towns in America and the colonies. It was always open to the English or Scotch agriculturist to take up some industrial pursuit in his own country, but few Irishmen could hope to find employment as artisans in Irish towns, and the alternative to starvation was emigration. "

    "The last twenty years of the nineteenth century have been for Ireland years of economic strain.....There are various signs that the agricultural depression which has produced such distress in Ireland during the nineteenth century has reached its lowest point, and that in the near future we may look for some return of prosperity. " (i.e. the Irish economy had been in a depression for 20 years at that stage and they still weren't sure if or when it'd get better.)

    Then chapter 17 on the lack of investment in Ireland: "On the whole the Committee came to the conclusion that the distress from which Ireland was suffering was not due to pressure of taxation, but rather to bad seasons. It did not think that the existing system of taxation interfered with the industrial development of the country or that it was called upon to recommend any relief to Ireland which would be at the expense of British tax-payers. As regarded further additional expenditure in Ireland, the Committee stated as its opinion that more harm than good was done in this way, at any rate as regards unproductive expenditure."

    It was therefore agreed that, financially speaking, Ireland had gained nothing from the Union, and might have lost much.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,072 ✭✭✭gjim


    You're changing the goalposts while being disingenuous but apparently I'm looking for an argument.

    "I said nothing about the post-independence economy, but used figures from post-independence to support ahistorical revisionist claims about pre-independence. I also meant absolute GDP rather than per capita, even though economics (and economists) always use per capita."

    K m8, valuable contribution thanks so much
    You seem to suffer severe comprehension issues. Why don't you actually try reading what I wrote instead of inventing strawmen. I didn't quote any figures, I said:
    GDP per head in Ireland was a little over half the UK average before independence.
    You're the one who produced a post independence GDP per capita statistic and then later claimed I was being disingenuous and was switching goalposts.

    And what originally set you off was:
    Ireland had been in relative economic decline for over a century before independence.
    Read the words very carefully. I didn't put "relative" in there to fill space. I said "economic decline", not GDP per head.

    And I'm the one moving goalposts and being disingenuous?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 248 ✭✭AAAAAAAAA


    dubrov wrote: »
    Could you link to the source?
    I am not doubting it is true but would like to see the details.

    https://www.ssb.no/statbank/table/11327/tableViewLayout1/

    Set "Statistikkvariabel" to "Nettoinvandring", "Statsborgerskap" to "Norge", "Kvartal" to the quarters you want to see and then click "Forsett"

    In 2018:
    Q1: -426
    Q2: -9
    Q3: -643
    Q4: -705

    Year total: 1783 more Norwegians emigrated than returned to Norway in 2018.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,181 ✭✭✭cgcsb


    ncounties wrote: »
    Their economy?

    Please explain how not having a high speed rail system would benefit the Spanish economy.


  • Posts: 18,749 ✭✭✭✭[Deleted User]


    A better comparison would be Ireland & Finland, fairly similar population.
    Wages pretty similar, costs & prices fairly similar.
    Third level education, free, maybe 200 Euro registration fee.
    Health care, free & no long waiting lists.


  • Registered Users Posts: 485 ✭✭Fritzbox


    Norway's net emigration of Norwegian citizens in 2018 was 1,777 people on a population of 5.4million.


    It's net migration overall was 18,103 immigrants.


    Anecdotes are no replacement when official statistics are easily available.

    The statistics for Ireland are even better:

    00129725-614.jpg?ratio=1.71

    PME2019FIG1.png
    https://www.cso.ie/en/releasesandpublications/er/pme/populationandmigrationestimatesapril2019/


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,529 ✭✭✭dubrov


    AAAAAAAAA wrote: »
    https://www.ssb.no/statbank/table/11327/tableViewLayout1/

    Set "Statistikkvariabel" to "Nettoinvandring", "Statsborgerskap" to "Norge", "Kvartal" to the quarters you want to see and then click "Forsett"

    In 2018:
    Q1: -426
    Q2: -9
    Q3: -643
    Q4: -705

    Year total: 1783 more Norwegians emigrated than returned to Norway in 2018.

    When I select all countries for that period, Norway comes out the worst.
    All the numbers are very low for all countries so are they reliable?
    Even Syria seems to have net inward migration of nearly 4k for the year.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 485 ✭✭Fritzbox


    bubblypop wrote: »
    A better comparison would be Ireland & Finland, fairly similar population.
    Wages pretty similar, costs & prices fairly similar.
    Third level education, free, maybe 200 Euro registration fee.
    Health care, free & no long waiting lists.

    Agree with that.
    Don't forget the 14% VAT on a loaf of bread and other foodstuffs (Standard rate: 24%)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taxation_in_Finland#VAT_and_excise_taxes


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,553 ✭✭✭Yellow_Fern


    bubblypop wrote: »
    A better comparison would be Ireland & Finland, fairly similar population.
    Wages pretty similar, costs & prices fairly similar.
    Third level education, free, maybe 200 Euro registration fee.
    Health care, free & no long waiting lists.

    Wrong. Plenty of waiting lists in Finland. You cant have waiting list free health. Doesnt work.


  • Posts: 18,749 ✭✭✭✭[Deleted User]


    Fritzbox wrote: »
    Agree with that.
    Don't forget the 14% VAT on a loaf of bread and other foodstuffs (Standard rate: 24%)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taxation_in_Finland#VAT_and_excise_taxes

    And yet, healthcare, education & childcare is all much much lower than Ireland.


  • Registered Users Posts: 485 ✭✭Fritzbox


    bubblypop wrote: »
    And yet, healthcare, education & childcare is all much much lower than Ireland.

    What do you mean - that these things are better in Ireland - or worse?


  • Posts: 18,749 ✭✭✭✭[Deleted User]


    Fritzbox wrote: »
    What do you mean - that these things are better in Ireland - or worse?

    Oh I mean the cost is much lower in Finland. And much better run in Finland.
    Bad grammar!


  • Posts: 18,749 ✭✭✭✭[Deleted User]


    Wrong. Plenty of waiting lists in Finland. You cant have waiting list free health. Doesnt work.

    No waiting for years, you may wait 2 or 3 months, that's not really waiting.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,553 ✭✭✭Yellow_Fern


    bubblypop wrote: »
    No waiting for years, you may wait 2 or 3 months, that's not really waiting.


    Median (mean) waiting times in days for common surgical procedures.
    Hip replacement Knee replacement Cataract Hysterectomy Prostatectomy Cholecystectomy
    Finland
    2011 113 136 111 81
    Ireland -127 -149 -114 -94
    2011 103 119 118 96
    -130 -153 -144 -131

    Siciliani, L., Moran, V., & Borowitz, M. (2014). Measuring and comparing health care waiting times in OECD countries. Health policy, 118(3), 292-303.



    Looking at this table, the differences are not so large. Granted its data from 2011 but still.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 47,863 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    maybe this is why the waiting lists in ireland for cataracts are lower than finland:

    https://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/cataract-patients-forced-to-travel-to-belfast-for-treatment-1.4160526


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 180 ✭✭Lord Fairlord


    Norway only gained independence in 1905. It's economy performed terribly in the late 1800s and into the early 1900s as it was predominantly agriculture/fishing+timer+maritime shipping.


    Norway has fantastic natural resources, but aside from hydro they only really came into play post ww2.


    Ireland was never asset stripped, wasn't a colony, and wasn't 'ravaged' by any genocide.


    Keep your ahistorical nonsense to me_ira on Reddit, and maybe try stick to actual facts on here?



    Ireland's economy was very strong in the period up until Independence - it was the economical policies & protectionism of the Irish governments that followed that decimated the Irish economy.



    As someone who travels to Norway (particularly Oslo) 8+ times a year, comparing anything about Ireland to Norway (or Dublin to Oslo) is just ludicrous.

    Norway had a peaceful separation from Sweden, unlike our independence process. I also believe that partition on our island caused some economic damage. That's not to say that our economy wasn't managed well for significant periods of time.


  • Registered Users Posts: 920 ✭✭✭Last Stop


    maybe this is why the waiting lists in ireland for cataracts are lower than finland:

    https://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/cataract-patients-forced-to-travel-to-belfast-for-treatment-1.4160526

    Of course this is part of the reason.
    And there is not a lot wrong with this method in the short term.
    Belfast clearly has spare capacity and we clearly have a deficiency.
    We should obviously built more facilities to allow us to do that work here but in the intervening 10 years until new facilities are built this is a good solution.

    This is where FF have got it right on health. The national treatment purchase fund is a great way of reducing waiting times in the short term


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  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 4,884 Mod ✭✭✭✭spacetweek


    Probably worth pointing out that the $47 billion coastal highway video in the first post on the thread has now been cancelled.

    Agreed that Norway has great infrastructure, but you're probably better to compare to somewhere like Denmark. Their infrastructure is really good too, not as good as Norway but very high quality.


  • Registered Users Posts: 32,582 ✭✭✭✭NIMAN


    spacetweek wrote: »
    Probably worth pointing out that the $47 billion coastal highway video in the first post on the thread has now been cancelled.

    So all the impressive graphics and engineering stuff was nonsense in the end.
    It was put on here as a reason to beat up the Irish again and show how great other countries are doing things, but it was all just a fancy pie in the sky.

    /thread


  • Registered Users Posts: 5 Pollies


    Norwegian infrastructure, including fish processing, is often seen as more advanced and efficient compared to its Irish counterpart.



  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 19,123 Mod ✭✭✭✭Sam Russell


    Mod: This is a four year old thread with the last previous post nearly four years ago.

    Start a new thread with a better reason to do so.



This discussion has been closed.
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