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Green Christmas

  • 30-09-2019 9:26pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 5,587 ✭✭✭ screamer


    Well, I’ve decided much as I love Christmas, I love the planet a lot more so this year I’m gonna ask Santa to leave the plastic shiny toys at the North Pole and bring some nice Woden toys, books and jigsaws. I’m also going to ask him not to wrap the presents. I’m giving online gift vouchers rather than the plastic carded type, and I’m not really sure what else, but I’m gonna try and enjoy Christmas without all the crap from China that I really don’t need. Anyone any other ideas for a greener Christmas?


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 6 ✭✭✭ cmsuser_jw12


    Great idea - I'll keep an eye out!


  • Registered Users Posts: 72,023 ✭✭✭✭ Atlantic Dawn


    Why not just give cash instead of vouchers, cash can be used anywhere and is already in circulation.


  • Registered Users Posts: 26,215 ✭✭✭✭ freshpopcorn


    I was going to say cash instead of vouchers also.
    I'd also the question of what I am giving to people. I know if I gave wooden toys, books, etc to some people. It would be thrown around the house and eventually end up in the fire or bin. (So, make sure what you are getting is matched to the person).
    A lot depends on the age bracket you are buying for.
    Try and bake at home instead of buying stuff.
    Also, if your really serious consider a vegan Christmas.

    Maybe consider making your home more green as a gift for the family also.


  • Registered Users Posts: 29,737 ✭✭✭✭ Graces7


    I live very simply out here on the island, and yes, green... No car, no washing machine etc, no central heating. With no living family. no present buying anyways and many years ago friends and I agreed on small gifts only. I mean at my age I have all I need and more. Consumables are always welcomed!

    Oh no TV but then internet does all that anyways. Love youtube

    I know it is a very different life out here... Never did give my cats Christmas gifts.. but I usually get a small turkey so we share that. Cats are obligate carnivores so cannot go vegan although my share will be minimal !

    But a deeply satisfying way... I am attached to some of my very old decorations; tradition works for me. And they hold memories. Far more satisfying and expressive in a different way than novelty... also as a pensioner !


  • Registered Users Posts: 29,737 ✭✭✭✭ Graces7


    Why not just give cash instead of vouchers, cash can be used anywhere and is already in circulation.

    could I suggest adding a very small personal gift with the cash especially for older folk? Makes it more meaningful and loving.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,485 ✭✭✭ Jude13


    A real biodegradable tree, you can buy one from a farm that either chops the top off an existing, replants or you cna even get a potted one and put it back after christmas!


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,587 ✭✭✭ screamer


    I’m ordering my turkey from a local farm this year and I’m looking into what decorations I can get that will not be all plasticy Chinese tat to replace broken stuff.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,517 ✭✭✭ bee06


    I was only thinking about this in the morning and wondering if it would be considered rude to tell my family not to buy plastic toys for my little boy if they were going to get him something for Christmas.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,485 ✭✭✭ Jude13


    ^^We were thinking the same thing. Wooden ones are pricey though. We have the luxury of saying not toys as we had a luggage allowance to think about to bring them home.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,012 ✭✭✭✭ Toto Wolfcastle


    As an aunt who doesn’t know what kids like, I’d love suggestions from the parents! Wouldn’t consider it rude at all.

    You need to think about the lifetime of the toy though. If a good quality plastic toy is played with for years and then passed on to the charity shop in excellent condition, it’s probably a better choice than a non-plastic toy the child plays with a couple of times and discards. If a wooden toy will be as loved, happy days. I think one of the best things you can do to have a greener Christmas is to buy things people will really love and actually use.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 11,640 ✭✭✭✭ meeeeh


    I don't usually reply in these threads because I'm not Christmas mad or particularly green but Christmas is time of excess. If you check what food was not eaten and what food was eaten just because it was there it can be reduced. Christmas jumpers are one of the most despicable items of clothing one can buy. Cheap tat made by poorly paid labour going straight to landfill so adults and children can look stupid in unflattering clothing. People going overboard with lights and using too much electricity making the house look tacky. Ugly plastic decorations bought on special in Lidl (or wherever else).

    If anyone wants to be more green at Christmas then buying less would be good beginning. And banning Christmas jumpers. What material kids toys are made from is completely irrelevant if they don't play with them. (And I'm a big fan of wooden toys, I think Hape make some brilliant stuff).

    Also among adults it is easy to agree not do gifts. It's not like most of them are appreciated.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,290 ✭✭✭ jackboy


    As an aunt who doesn’t know what kids like, I’d love suggestions from the parents! Wouldn’t consider it rude at all.

    You need to think about the lifetime of the toy though. If a good quality plastic toy is played with for years and then passed on to the charity shop in excellent condition, it’s probably a better choice than a non-plastic toy the child plays with a couple of times and discards. If a wooden toy will be as loved, happy days. I think one of the best things you can do to have a greener Christmas is to buy things people will really love and actually use.

    In general wooden toys are more robust than most plastic toys. This is especially true of the plastic rubbish sold at the big chains such as smiths and world of wonder.

    Children sometimes get bored of certain toys but then go back playing with them several months later. So, it is worth getting longer lasting toys, even if they are a bit more expensive.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,012 ✭✭✭✭ Toto Wolfcastle


    jackboy wrote: »
    In general wooden toys are more robust than most plastic toys. This is especially true of the plastic rubbish sold at the big chains such as smiths and world of wonder.

    Children sometimes get bored of certain toys but then go back playing with them several months later. So, it is worth getting longer lasting toys, even if they are a bit more expensive.
    The real problem is that children are too fickle. :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,224 ✭✭✭ zerosugarbuzz


    meeeeh wrote: »
    I don't usually reply in these threads because I'm not Christmas mad or particularly green but Christmas is time of excess. If you check what food was not eaten and what food was eaten just because it was there it can be reduced. Christmas jumpers are one of the most despicable items of clothing one can buy. Cheap tat made by poorly paid labour going straight to landfill so adults and children can look stupid in unflattering clothing. People going overboard with lights and using too much electricity making the house look tacky. Ugly plastic decorations bought on special in Lidl (or wherever else).

    If anyone wants to be more green at Christmas then buying less would be good beginning. And banning Christmas jumpers. What material kids toys are made from is completely irrelevant if they don't play with them. (And I'm a big fan of wooden toys, I think Hape make some brilliant stuff).

    Also among adults it is easy to agree not do gifts. It's not like most of them are appreciated.

    A lot of people really enjoy Christmas jumpers, not me I might add. Just purchase ones make of pure wool or even cotton. Knitting is making a come back so it should be easy enough to get one made.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,939 ✭✭✭ goat2


    Jude13 wrote: »
    A real biodegradable tree, you can buy one from a farm that either chops the top off an existing, replants or you cna even get a potted one and put it back after christmas!

    Funnily enough, I do own a tree with the past 20 yrs and think that by using this every year I do help save the planet, I call it re using it, has saved me a bomb also, as Ido see fresh trees are very expensive, and I am not complaining but , It seems to be a pure waste of ten good yrs of growth to cut down a fine plant just for the sake of one week, and then trying to compost it, would rather let it there growing cleaning the air as it does so, and my tree cost me 20 all those yrs ago


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,640 ✭✭✭✭ meeeeh


    A lot of people really enjoy Christmas jumpers, not me I might add. Just purchase ones make of pure wool or even cotton. Knitting is making a come back so it should be easy enough to get one made.

    Well if someone wants to spend 100 Euro on something non plasticky that has antlers sticking out and intends to wear it year after year I have no objection. Nobody does though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,012 ✭✭✭✭ Toto Wolfcastle


    I think most people in this forum (and in general) wear the same Christmas jumpers every year. I don’t think people buy them, wear them a couple of times and bin them. The world is crap enough at the moment without a little bit of Christmas joy in it and I know Christmas jumpers make me happy throughout December.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,939 ✭✭✭ goat2


    When I see red trees, white trees and gold trees selling in shops, I do laugh, as I have never seen any of those colours on the trees in natural environment,


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,640 ✭✭✭✭ meeeeh


    I think most people in this forum (and in general) wear the same Christmas jumpers every year. I don’t think people buy them, wear them a couple of times and bin them. The world is crap enough at the moment without a little bit of Christmas joy in it and I know Christmas jumpers make me happy throughout December.

    Clothing industry is one of the main polluters and build on very unethical working practices. I'm not sure it's where I would be looking for Christmas joy. And considering everybody even discounters are selling Christmas jumpers I very much doubt they are worn for years. They are ultimate disposable clothing item together with festival fashion and 15 Euro going out dresses.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,177 Ironicname


    FFS. Greta has ruined Christmas now.


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  • Registered Users, Subscribers Posts: 47,100 ✭✭✭✭ Zaph


    I think in principle buying wooden toys over plastic toys is a good idea, but I think the big problem is that kids these days are "more sophisticated", for want of a better description, than kids 50 years ago. You simply can't get the level of detail in a wooden toy that you can with a plastic one, so unless it's a present for quite a young kid there's a good chance they won't be satisfied with it and will lose interest very quickly. So the dilemma is then do you buy something "greener" that will essentially be discarded in no time, or something less green but gets played with over and over for a long time? If the kid likes reading or doing jigsaws, then obviously there's plenty of scope there, but I don't envy parents who are trying to do their bit for the environment if all their kid wants is the latest Barbie/action figure stable set/secret lair/whatever.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,517 ✭✭✭ bee06


    Zaph wrote: »
    I think in principle buying wooden toys over plastic toys is a good idea, but I think the big problem is that kids these days are "more sophisticated", for want of a better description, than kids 50 years ago. You simply can't get the level of detail in a wooden toy that you can with a plastic one, so unless it's a present for quite a young kid there's a good chance they won't be satisfied with it and will lose interest very quickly. So the dilemma is then do you buy something "greener" that will essentially be discarded in no time, or something less green but gets played with over and over for a long time? If the kid likes reading or doing jigsaws, then obviously there's plenty of scope there, but I don't envy parents who are trying to do their bit for the environment if all their kid wants is the latest Barbie/action figure stable set/secret lair/whatever.

    I have an almost 2 year old so fickleness and the latest thing isn’t an issue. We got some terrible plastic toys last year which he had no interest in so that’s what’s driving my thought on requesting no plastic this year. I’d be delighted with jigsaws and books etc (and so would my little boy).


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 26,589 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Posy


    Like Toto said, I wouldn't mind at all if someone requested books/jigsaws. There is no point in wasting money on something the child/parents won't want! I'd definitely prefer to have guidance when shopping for kiddies. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 26,215 ✭✭✭✭ freshpopcorn


    I think most people in this forum (and in general) wear the same Christmas jumpers every year. I don’t think people buy them, wear them a couple of times and bin them. The world is crap enough at the moment without a little bit of Christmas joy in it and I know Christmas jumpers make me happy throughout December.

    I have to say I totally agree with you here.
    Most people I know may have one or two Christmas jumpers but they are worn for a few days over the festive period and then are put back in the wardrobe for next year. Those who do get rid of them generally give to charity.
    Most guys I know get more wear out of there Christmas jumper than they do out of suits. Which may only be worn a few times before it gets dated and then nobody really wants it.
    Christmas jumpers don't really date.


  • Registered Users Posts: 26,215 ✭✭✭✭ freshpopcorn


    bee06 wrote: »
    I have an almost 2 year old so fickleness and the latest thing isn’t an issue. We got some terrible plastic toys last year which he had no interest in so that’s what’s driving my thought on requesting no plastic this year. I’d be delighted with jigsaws and books etc (and so would my little boy).

    Most people don't mind being told to get a certain thing for a kid once it's not a crazy expensive request.
    My advice is just to say they want books to people.
    If you go down the route of looking for environmentally friendly toys you could people under pressure.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 26,589 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Posy


    I'm the same- mine (I think I have three) are put away and taken out again every Christmas, given a freshen up in the dryer with some bounce and are good to go. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,517 ✭✭✭ bee06


    Most people don't mind being told to get a certain thing for a kid once it's not a crazy expensive request.
    My advice is just to say they want books to people.
    If you go down the route of looking for environmentally friendly toys you could people under pressure.

    I wasn’t going to request environmentally friendly toys ... just no plastic toys.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,162 ✭✭✭✭ KKV


    I thought the whole plastic/climate thing was to do with single-use plastic?

    I thought that was what people were combatting?

    I'm 31 now and I still have loads of plastic wrestling toys in my house (mostly the attic, I admit, but i always said I'd put them on display somewhere in the house) but they have lasted, are still there and have been played with as toys for years, and then kept as collectibles for many more years.


    I don't think denying kids a decent present is a good idea at all :confused: I appreciate Christmas has turned into a Season of the year at this stage, rather than a month, but I still think it's a good thing to have that 'christmas joy' portion of the year without ruining it for kids by getting them 'santa hates me' jigsaw presents. Next generation won't bother with Christmas for their kids, if it was a load of sh/te when they were growing up.



    I fully understand people giving out about excessive plastic being used on packaging, being used unnecessarily, etc. but I don't think Christmas Gifts are single-use, or are generally throwaway items anyway (unless you are just buying any old random tat to 'fill the stocking' or to post up all your gifts on facebook :rolleyes: ).


    Besides, though I don't have kids myself, my brother's kids (6 and 8) are just looking for virtual gifts. Vouchers for videogames online and that kinda craic, so not all kids will be getting loads of plastic stuff they don't want anyway, by simply naturally not requesting it, themselves.


    Same with artificial christmas trees.. I don't see the harm? We've had a good one that got about 10-12 years of use before it ended up in the bin. It's not (generally) a throwaway item.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,399 ✭✭✭✭ iamwhoiam


    Aldi do a great range of wooden toys in early December . Kitchens , pots , pans and wooden food . And a workbench and tools and baby toys too


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  • Registered Users Posts: 26,215 ✭✭✭✭ freshpopcorn


    bee06 wrote: »
    I wasn’t going to request environmentally friendly toys ... just no plastic toys.

    I understand where your coming from but I know if somebody made that request to me I'd feel like I'd have to go off and source some locally sourced hand built toy.


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