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The Ceratopsian Thread- Horned Dinosaurs

24

Comments

  • Administrators, Computer Games Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 31,134 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭ Mickeroo


    Aye zoology has died a death activity wise the last week or two also. Christmas, exams, dissertations all distracting me at the moment :o

    So why did it take them so long to name this fellow then anyone know? Was it just a case of not getting around to it or was there some dispute over whether it was a new species or not?


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 Rubecula


    Adam Khor wrote: »
    First of all... is everyone ok? Seems to me that this forum is reaching its KT boundary if you know what I mean...

    Anyways, it's been nearly 100 years since this dinosaur was discovered, yet it had never been described or named. Sometimes I just hate paleontologists. Who knows what other amazing things we're missing...

    dino-spinops-drawing-490_106680_2.jpg

    http://www.science20.com/news_articles/spinops_sternbergorum_horned_dinosaur_discovery_100_years_making-85273


    Yes I have been a little bit slack of late and I send my apologies. I seem to have trouble finding stuff of interest to post up, and also work is killing me just now, Only have time for quick visits. But I am still around even when I don't log in.

    Find me a big marine reptile called Rubecula rex and you will not shut me up :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 128 ✭✭ Allosaur


    Galvasean wrote: »
    That;s the very frustrating thing about palaeontology in general. Everything takes so bloody long to do!!!!
    Mickeroo wrote: »
    So why did it take them so long to name this fellow then anyone know? Was it just a case of not getting around to it or was there some dispute over whether it was a new species or not?

    Nope. The powers that be figure that "The things have been dead for at least 65 million years. They aren't going anywhere any time soon, so whats the rush. And while we are at it, where's my grant money...."


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean




  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 Rubecula


    Oh Dear Lord someone duct tape Horner somewhere quiet


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  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    An end in sight? The discovery of what appears to be a sub-adult Torosaurus (if Horner and co.'s theory is correct then there should be no such thing as a sub-adult Torosaurus, just a Triceratops) seems to put the idea to bed (and also indicates that Torosaurus could grow to be even bigger than once thought.
    http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0032623


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    This is a photo of a fossilized pair of Psittacosaurus (nicknamed "loving dragons" or "cuddling dragons") found in China in 2010.
    14543548063538413375.jpg

    Here's the article anyways in case someone knows more Chinese than I do (easy XD)

    http://expo.people.com.cn/GB/17356840.html


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    Ah yes, Love In The Time Of ChasmoPsittacosaurus...


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Its name means "alien horned face", supossedly because of its "unusual" horn pattern although by now, with the likes of Medusaceratops, Kosmoceratops, Einiosaurus etc, it doesn´t look that alien anymore.
    Still, interesting creature with a nice classic-sounding name. At 20 feet long and only 2 tons, it was about the size of a black rhino, large for modern day standards but not particularly large for a ceratopsian. It lived around 80 million years ago.

    http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/full/10.1139/e2012-056#.UJxdymf4Vac

    Xenoceratops.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    Nice artwork. I love the colours.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 Rubecula


    But did it have feathers? :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    Rubecula wrote: »
    But did it have feathers? :D

    I'd doubt it personally, but the related psittacosaurs did and there have been highly controversial reports of a small amount of feathery things on Triceratops. So, never say never.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 Rubecula


    Galvasean wrote: »
    I'd doubt it personally, but the related psittacosaurs did and there have been highly controversial reports of a small amount of feathery things on Triceratops. So, never say never.

    What? Never? :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    Every time a child says that word another dino drops dead :(


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    This one's named after the Rio Bravo (Rio Grande) as its fossils were found in Texas, and after Polyphemus the cyclops from the Odyssey.

    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00114-013-1063-0#page-1

    http://dennonychus.blogspot.mx/2013/05/new-discovery-bravoceratops-polyphemus.html

    scolosaurus.jpg


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor




  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor




  • Registered Users Posts: 25,560 ✭✭✭✭ Kess73


    Quite a large skull. Would imagine that it would go straight in as one of the largest pachyrhinosaur skulls found to date, if not the largest.


    Wonder will we see the max estimated size of pachyrhinosaur being revised as a result.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    I had already seen estimates of 8 meter long Pachyrhinosaurus D: If this one was bigger it may even join the ranks of largest ceratopsians, and possibly the largest known centrosaurine...

    pachyrhinosaurus-size.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    What's the usual size estimate for Pachyrhinosaurus, 5.5metres?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 25,560 ✭✭✭✭ Kess73


    Galvasean wrote: »
    What's the usual size estimate for Pachyrhinosaurus, 5.5metres?



    The most accepted estimates are that it size range would be between 5m and 8m


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,560 ✭✭✭✭ Kess73


    Adam Khor wrote: »
    I had already seen estimates of 8 meter long Pachyrhinosaurus D: If this one was bigger it may even join the ranks of largest ceratopsians, and possibly the largest known centrosaurine...

    pachyrhinosaurus-size.jpg



    I think the 8m length was an estimated maximum length based on smaller skulls that were found. But now they have actually found a two metre long skull (which I think would have belonged to an animal of between 7.5m and 8.5m based on old estimates), the estimated maximum length will probably go up because the chances of it being the skull of the longest/biggest ever to exist have to be miniscule.


    Would certainly push it into Triceratops territory (8m to 9.5m) with regards to length although it is nowhere near heavily built enough to challenge the Trike in terms of weight

    Be pretty cool to see Pachyrhinosaurus get a size upgrade though. Think the current estimates top out at 8m and 4 or 5 tons (far from being a small animal as is), but an extra metre or so in length could see it gain anything from half a ton to a ton and a half extra if my guesstimations are even close to being correct.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Yeah, I bet most dinosaurs grew bigger than we currently believe. Even today, "monster" specimens of living animals turn up once in a while. Also, dinos didn´t have trophy hunters killing off the ones with the best genes...


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    Poor Hogzilla :(


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,560 ✭✭✭✭ Kess73




  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    Shame really. Oh look, a one of a kind critter... let's shoot it!

    'murica!


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,560 ✭✭✭✭ Kess73


    Galvasean wrote: »
    Shame really. Oh look, a one of a kind critter... let's shoot it!

    'murica!



    Q, King Kong, fake Godzilla.......they have form for it alright. :)


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Galvasean wrote: »
    Shame really. Oh look, a one of a kind critter... let's shoot it!

    'murica!

    U-U Not unlike cutting down a tree that's hundreds of years old. The world needs its monsters- the good kind, I mean.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,560 ✭✭✭✭ Kess73


    Adam Khor wrote: »
    U-U Not unlike cutting down a tree that's hundreds of years old. The world needs its monsters- the good kind, I mean.



    Take away the monster and you take away the sense of wonder.


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  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Exactly, and what is life itself without the sense of wonder? Once you stop being in awe, you're as good as dead.


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