Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on hello@boards.ie for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact hello@boards.ie
Hi all,
Vanilla are planning an update to the site on April 24th (next Wednesday). It is a major PHP8 update which is expected to boost performance across the site. The site will be down from 7pm and it is expected to take about an hour to complete. We appreciate your patience during the update.
Thanks all.

Plants that are poisonous to animals

  • 25-04-2019 5:39pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 530 ✭✭✭


    Hi all, am pulling out an old laurel hedge at the minute, have heard it toxic to cattl & dont think its the nicest anyway. Anyone know anything about Aucuba japonica? Is it safe for cattle?
    Any other shrubs or trees us farmers need to be wary of?


«1

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 563 ✭✭✭Yakov P. Golyadkin


    The yew tree is toxic to cattle.


  • Registered Users Posts: 530 ✭✭✭RD10


    Yes know someone who had a bad experience with cattle and the leaves of a yew tree.
    Cant seem to find anything definite on the Aucuba japonica.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,748 ✭✭✭ganmo


    Rhodedren nearly lost 4 rams to it years ago

    BIG buckets of tea helped cure them :P


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,023 ✭✭✭✭Donald Trump


    ganmo wrote: »
    Rhodedren nearly lost 4 rams to it years ago

    BIG buckets of tea helped cure them :P




    Was the tea for you or the rams?




    For the OP, obviously ragworth can kill animals if they eat enough of it


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,039 ✭✭✭✭Say my name


    RD10 wrote: »
    Hi all, am pulling out an old laurel hedge at the minute, have heard it toxic to cattl & dont think its the nicest anyway. Anyone know anything about Aucuba japonica? Is it safe for cattle?
    Any other shrubs or trees us farmers need to be wary of?

    If laurel is poisonous to cattle then the variegated form is surely too..?

    Tbh I've had laurel trees on ditches and never had a problem with poisoning with cattle. I've even had the leaves end up in the silage and the cattle just leave those bits. Maybe that's luck???

    Sycamore seeds are supposed to be poisonous to horses.
    Oak leaves and acorns if eaten in an amount are poisonous to cattle and horses.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 7,748 ✭✭✭ganmo


    Was the tea for you or the rams?

    The rams, they like it black


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,464 ✭✭✭Ultimate Seduction


    Would the animals ever eat mushrooms


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,681 ✭✭✭✭patsy_mccabe


    Has anyone ever seen cattle poisoned with Laurel?
    Neighbour here has cow very sick with what I thought was photosensitazation. I've just realised now, that there was a lot of Laurel leaves thrown into the field. I think she might have eaten them.

    'The Bishops blessed the Blueshirts in Galway, As they sailed beneath the Swastika to Spain'



  • Registered Users Posts: 70 ✭✭twofish101




  • Registered Users Posts: 18,473 ✭✭✭✭_Brian


    Has anyone ever seen cattle poisoned with Laurel?
    Neighbour here has cow very sick with what I thought was photosensitazation. I've just realised now, that there was a lot of Laurel leaves thrown into the field. I think she might have eaten them.

    Problem with cut anything including grass is it allows them eat way too quickly and easily and they will sicken themselves.
    Part of our land backs onto laurels amd I’ve ever seen cattle touch it at all


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 29,072 ✭✭✭✭whelan2


    _Brian wrote: »
    Problem with cut anything including grass is it allows them eat way too quickly and easily and they will sicken themselves.
    Part of our land backs onto laurels amd I’ve ever seen cattle touch it at all

    It's strange though remember the post here a few weeks ago of an animal that died after eating fox gloves. Never saw an animal eat them either


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,748 ✭✭✭ganmo


    Had a ewe eat holly this spring. God knows why she thought it was a good idea


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,301 ✭✭✭Anto_Meath


    Driving around the country I am seeing a lot of ragworth in fields, I detest the sight of them, I cant understand why people don't pull them. Thankfully I have none, but I do keep an eye every day I am herding the cattle and pull any I see, I have a new parcel of 20 acres rented this year and there was a few in it but I think I have them all now. I have noticed that the road verges have a lot of them especially the motorways, the council / NRA should take some responsibility in doing away with them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,732 ✭✭✭Capercaillie


    If laurel is poisonous to cattle then the variegated form is surely too..?

    Tbh I've had laurel trees on ditches and never had a problem with poisoning with cattle. I've even had the leaves end up in the silage and the cattle just leave those bits. Maybe that's luck???

    Sycamore seeds are supposed to be poisonous to horses.
    Oak leaves and acorns if eaten in an amount are poisonous to cattle and horses.

    Will generally only eat laurel if they are starved. The same with fern poisoning, they will generally only it it if starved.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,132 ✭✭✭✭Base price


    Will generally only eat laurel if they are starved. The same with fern poisoning, they will generally only it it if starved.
    We had a problem a couple of years ago when ESB contractors cut ferns on a ditch to get access to a pole. Some yearlings ate some of the wilted ferns and we had to get the Vet to treat seven. They all made a full recovery but were off for a few days.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,920 ✭✭✭Hard Knocks


    Is Groundsel Dangerous after it’s cut?


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,473 ✭✭✭✭_Brian


    whelan2 wrote: »
    It's strange though remember the post here a few weeks ago of an animal that died after eating fox gloves. Never saw an animal eat them either


    Wonder how hungry was that animal, or what essentials was it lacking that drove it to eat a poisonus plant like that.... Have never ever seen any animal eat fox glove and some years we have plenty.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,654 ✭✭✭Castlekeeper


    St John's worth, an Hypericum, causes photosensitivity.
    Bracken is poisonous but rarely eaten, apparatus the danger stage is when the fronds are unfurling if stock are hungry.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,039 ✭✭✭✭Say my name


    St John's worth, an Hypericum, causes photosensitivity.
    Bracken is poisonous but rarely eaten, apparatus the danger stage is when the fronds are unfurling if stock are hungry.

    The stock go mad for bracken here (and ivy)

    Not sure what that says about my stock?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,181 ✭✭✭Lady Haywire


    Ours go mad here for laurel as we move them past it.
    Reckon you can strike 'unpalatable' off the list\!


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 29,072 ✭✭✭✭whelan2


    _Brian wrote: »
    Wonder how hungry was that animal, or what essentials was it lacking that drove it to eat a poisonus plant like that.... Have never ever seen any animal eat fox glove and some years we have plenty.

    Ye my dad still says he never heard of anything eating them ever


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,132 ✭✭✭✭Base price


    Is Groundsel Dangerous after it’s cut?
    Apparently it is if enough of it is eaten the same as ragwort. It is the same family as ragwort. See 3.2 in the link.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4690134/


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,132 ✭✭✭✭Base price


    St John's worth, an Hypericum, causes photosensitivity.
    Bracken is poisonous but rarely eaten, apparatus the danger stage is when the fronds are unfurling if stock are hungry.
    Our Vet told us that Buckwheat causes photosensitisation too. Some wild bird cover mixes contain buckwheat.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,611 ✭✭✭Lime Tree Farm


    Base price wrote: »
    Apparently it is if enough of it is eaten the same as ragwort. It is the same family as ragwort. See 3.2 in the link.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4690134/

    I see horsetail in that list. We have an invasion of horsetail along by the river. The cows eat them, I didn't know they were poisonous.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,132 ✭✭✭✭Base price


    I see horsetail in that list. We have an invasion of horsetail along by the river. The cows eat them, I didn't know they were poisonous.
    Apparently they are very difficult to kill out. We don't have any but my brother had some growing years ago along one hedge and had to use brushwood herbicide to kill them out as I didn't want them in the hay.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,920 ✭✭✭Hard Knocks


    Base price wrote: »
    Apparently it is if enough of it is eaten the same as ragwort. It is the same family as ragwort. See 3.2 in the link.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4690134/

    Thanks
    I better lift the few just to be safe


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,132 ✭✭✭✭Base price


    Thanks
    I better lift the few just to be safe
    TBH we have some growing in the fields and until seeing your post I didn't know they were poisonous.
    Did Kovu post a pic a of them a few weeks ago?


  • Registered Users Posts: 363 ✭✭Tig98


    I think Ivy is actually good for them, something like iodine in the leaves that's good for their immune system. They all love it here anyway, especially before they come in and grass is tight

    My father had a cow here years ago that ate ragwort. The vet gave her an injection to make her eat and she was fine. Its the same thing they give to old ones in nursing homes to give them an appetite apparently


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,181 ✭✭✭Lady Haywire


    Base price wrote: »
    TBH we have some growing in the fields and until seeing your post I didn't know they were poisonous.
    Did Kovu post a pic a of them a few weeks ago?

    Wasn't me, I don't think!
    Tig98 wrote: »
    I think Ivy is actually good for them, something like iodine in the leaves that's good for their immune system. They all love it here anyway, especially before they come in and grass is tight

    My father had a cow here years ago that ate ragwort. The vet gave her an injection to make her eat and she was fine. Its the same thing they give to old ones in nursing homes to give them an appetite apparently

    Ivy is great for them, always give it to cows off colour here. It's something which they might actually pick at when they're turning their nose up at grass or hay/silage.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 1,654 ✭✭✭Castlekeeper


    Tig98 wrote: »
    I think Ivy is actually good for them, something like iodine in the leaves that's good for their immune system. They all love it here anyway, especially before they come in and grass is tight

    My father had a cow here years ago that ate ragwort. The vet gave her an injection to make her eat and she was fine. Its the same thing they give to old ones in nursing homes to give them an appetite apparently

    Zinc anyway and calcium, not iodine I don't think.


Advertisement