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The 70's and 80's in Ireland

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  • 14-09-2018 5:13pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 23,562 ✭✭✭✭


    What was it like in the 1980's in Ireland?

    I have seen pictures, video and my god it looked like a depressing place. :eek:

    Grey, delapidated, hopeless.

    What was it like? How did you get by without internets, wheelie bins, toilets...?

    Would you go back if you could??

    *Might as well throw in the 70's too for people of that vintage.


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Comments

  • Site Banned Posts: 386 ✭✭Jimmy.


    The pull out method was all the rage.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 32,688 ✭✭✭✭ytpe2r5bxkn0c1


    Both decades were, to my experience, marked by high unemployment and high interest rates.


    I wouldn't go back to them for any reason.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,532 ✭✭✭savemejebus


    Good things tasted better


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,562 ✭✭✭✭banie01


    We all had great laughs avoiding the consumption.
    Fitness levels were great in the young.
    We all ran like lunatics to avoid being ridden by clergy!
    Look at the decline in Irish middle distance running since the veil was lifted on paedo priests!

    Renault 4s and Ford escorts were the common.
    A Sierra Cosworth was a "Super car"
    And only "posh" neighbours had a car and a house phone!
    To this day, I know my childhood next door neighbours phone number.
    Skinning orchards and drinking in fields!
    The huge crush at the labour exchange when your Granda would be out of work.

    What's really scary....
    I saw the end of the 70's and all of the 80's
    Is I'm only 38! :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,398 ✭✭✭✭mariaalice


    Well, I had a great time and surprisingly enough we go by without the internet. I associate it with the start of Ireland reflecting on its self as a nation a lot of the staried-eyed idea of the republic began to be questioned, you had series like strumpet city on the TV, and while we always had emigration it was only when middle-class emigration became an issue in the 1980s that it became a thing in the media and general discourse in society which is interesting.

    Going to college was a big deal you had to have the metric and or a very good leaving cert.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,667 ✭✭✭Hector Bellend


    I was only born in 1977.

    I was a little too young to worry about interest rates and unemployment.

    I was too busy trying to get a feel of Debbie Whelans arse. Thats what happens when you think with your flute.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,942 ✭✭✭topper75


    Both decades were, to my experience, marked by high unemployment and high interest rates.


    I wouldn't go back to them for any reason.

    I can't pretty up unemployment for anyone.

    But the high rates meant little or no speculation in the housing side of things.

    If you did get that job, then a house would follow. The mortgage deposit % wasn't as rigourous something like 10%. Yes the monthly repayments would be rough. But it was at least ATTAINABLE. Big difference to today.

    It is pointless looking back at a historical period saying Oh they had no X like we have today. We didn't know about it back then, and what you don't know ...

    An Irish CB ran the rate for the punt. It was a currency/rate for OUR economy, not for a depressed German banking sector or a roaring Parisian property market. It was ours. By us, for us.
    And our politicians gave that away without ever asking us.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,193 ✭✭✭Silentcorner


    This country will never see those kind of days again...but it was the pre celebrity culture era...and the pre social media era...we'll never see the likes those days again either...


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 32,688 ✭✭✭✭ytpe2r5bxkn0c1


    topper75 wrote: »
    I can't pretty up unemployment for anyone.

    But the high rates meant little or no speculation in the housing side of things.

    If you did get that job, then a house would follow. The mortgage deposit % wasn't as rigourous something like 10%. Yes the monthly repayments would be rough. But it was at least ATTAINABLE. Big difference to today.

    It is pointless looking back at a historical period saying Oh they had no X like we have today. We didn't know about it back then, and what you don't know ...

    An Irish CB ran the rate for the punt. It was a currency/rate for OUR economy, not for a depressed German banking sector or a roaring Parisian property market. It was ours. By us, for us.
    And our politicians gave that away without ever asking us.

    Mortgage deposit was 20% and repayments meant a huge struggle with more that a full salary in payments. In the 80s Mortgages were attainable mostly only if both spouses were working. We had two good jobs in which we were well established through this period and really struggled to pay a mortgage on a very modest home, doing without holidays, social life, and any purchases over and above the necessities - no phone, video players, a 10 year old car, etc.

    Only from the 90s on did things become more obtainable.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,122 ✭✭✭BeerWolf


    Uncomfortable, itchy wooly jumpers.

    I don't miss that.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 16,562 ✭✭✭✭banie01


    topper75 wrote: »
    An Irish CB ran the rate for the punt. It was a currency/rate for OUR economy, not for a depressed German banking sector or a roaring Parisian property market. It was ours. By us, for us.
    And our politicians gave that away without ever asking us.

    I'd beg to differ, this would have been the Maastricht treaty referendum.
    The aims and objectives of harmonisation and transfer from the ERM/ECU to a pan-european currency were voted on and accepted by the people.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,193 ✭✭✭Silentcorner


    Lucky bags...if I'd have been on the ball I'd have sued the manufacturers!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,562 ✭✭✭✭banie01


    BeerWolf wrote: »
    Uncomfortable, itchy jumpers.

    I don't miss that.

    I totally forgot about spending my formative years in itchy as fúck cable knit Aran jumpers and duffle coats!


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,430 ✭✭✭RustyNut


    Life before Mobile phones, feckin bliss.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,360 ✭✭✭Lorelli!



    Grey, delapidated, hopeless.

    no, the 70s were full of floral and other kinds of patterns and different shades of dodgy greens and browns with an orange hue!


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,082 ✭✭✭TheRiverman


    Being hot and and horny on Saturday nights in 1975/76 in my father's Morris Minor that he was brave and trustworthy enough to give me.


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    70’s brought discotheques to Ireland. It was also a time of frustration because heavy petting was as far as we could safely go. Bell bottoms. Matheus Rose. The Indians.
    It was a fun time. I was transitioning from a teenager to adulthood. An exciting time of love, music, leaving home, arctic roll, battered sausages, cheesecloth shirts and gypsy skirts.

    All the boring stuff like marriage and kids and mortgage came in the 80’s.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,738 ✭✭✭smokingman


    Giving out to my brothers and parents about not rewinding the vhs tapes...


  • Registered Users Posts: 43,028 ✭✭✭✭SEPT 23 1989


    Everything was orange and brown


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,454 ✭✭✭mloc123


    Mortgage deposit was 20% and repayments meant a huge struggle with more that a full salary in payments. In the 80s Mortgages were attainable mostly only if both spouses were working. We had two good jobs in which we were well established through this period and really struggled to pay a mortgage on a very modest home, doing without holidays, social life, and any purchases over and above the necessities - no phone, video players, a 10 year old car, etc.

    Only from the 90s on did things become more obtainable.

    People now piss and moan about the cost of a mortgage each month. Nothing compared to the 80s (as a percentage of income)... But now they HAVE to pay that 60e a month on phone bill (to get a free iPhone), the 100e a month for broadband and TV, weekly social allowance and holiday fund.

    But things were easier for their parents... Sure anyone on a modest wage could buy a red brick in d6 back then.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 30,323 ✭✭✭✭freshpopcorn


    Not Ireland but I recently saw some episodes of Crimewatch UK from the 1980's.
    They called a man sleeping in a door way a tramp and the homosexuals got a bad doing as well. If it aired Today Twitter would explode.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,345 ✭✭✭ChippingSodbury


    topper75 wrote: »
    ...

    An Irish CB ran the rate for the punt. It was a currency/rate for OUR economy, not for a depressed German banking sector or a roaring Parisian property market. It was ours. By us, for us.
    And our politicians gave that away without ever asking us.

    Well they did ask us in the referendums. But running your own currency isn't all sweetness and light either: don't you remember the currency crisis in 1992/1993?
    One of the most notable features of the currency crisis was the
    unprecedented levels to which Irish interest rates were increased
    in defence of the currency. Initially, the Central Bank refrained
    from increasing its Short Term Facility (STF) rate but, as it became
    clear that pressure on money-market rates would persist, the STF
    rate was raised by three percentage points to 13.75 per cent
    on 28 September 1992. The Bank later suspended the STF and
    provided overnight support at rates of up to 100 per cent
    — see
    Chart 2. Official rate increases were reflected in short-term
    money-market interest rates and were passed on to business
    borrowers who had DIBOR-related contracts.

    At that time a £75,000 mortgage over 20 years would have cost you almost £900 a month at a time when average industrial wage was about £500 per week before tax. I was a bit young but I think interest rate went as high as 25% for deposits around that time.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,995 ✭✭✭Ipso


    In the late 90's I got a student loan, the rate was 10%. It's between 4 and 5 now and people are complaining about it compared to the rest of Europe.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,055 ✭✭✭UrbanFret


    The 80s music has stood the test of time. The pub scene was fantastic, now spoiled by every supermarket selling dirt cheap alcohol. Work was scarce, still is away from the cities and large towns. The british army garrisons were on every road across the frontier harrassing(and worse) people trying to travel a few miles north and there was a good living to be made smuggling. Mixed memories but Im glad I lived through it and not the modern day camera phone recorded existence. All that remains are some grubby photographs on kodak paper and the memories, as it should be !


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,555 ✭✭✭Roger Hassenforder


    Formica furniture
    Black and white TV - I remember when Dad arrived home with a colour TV like it was yesterday.
    Admiral Manchester United Jerseys...

    They were the days...


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,751 ✭✭✭✭dxhound2005


    UrbanFret wrote: »
    The 80s music has stood the test of time. The pub scene was fantastic, now spoiled by every supermarket selling dirt cheap alcohol.

    I wonder do people got to pubs for sessions these days?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,438 ✭✭✭Sgt Hartman


    Back then once someone went beyond the age of 30 they were considered middle aged and they dressed and had hairstyles as such. I've seen people in their early 30's on Reeling in the Years and by the way they looked and dressed they would easily pass for someone in their early 50's now.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,438 ✭✭✭Sgt Hartman


    Also, brown clothing, y fronts and bathing only once a week seemed to be the rage back then.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,995 ✭✭✭Ipso


    Also, brown clothing, y fronts and bathing only once a week seemed to be the rage back then.

    And walking or cycling to school (granted there are more cars on the roads these days).


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,019 ✭✭✭cajonlardo


    In the late 70s I went into A&E with broken bones in my hand . This was about 10 am. X-rayed, bones set and plaster and home in time for dinner. You'd be lucky to get out in 12 hours now.

    I've a DVD here showing an event that travelled the country in the mid 70s. Crowds came out I'm the town's and I cannot see fat people amongst them. Believe me weight watchers wouldn't have made money.

    Bought a house in 86.
    I had an unskilled job and if I'd had 2 years wages on the table that would have covered the house price. I mean if you were a factory worker or supermarket checkout operator you could buy a house.
    There was any number of houses for sale and you just offered 10% less than asking

    Every gob****e wasn't going to 3rd level and I think there were less bitter twisted "Professional" types as a result. Apprenticeships , the defense forces and other career routes were options

    There were the obvious problems ( not great times for women, maybe even worse for LGBT)

    One big drawback was the emigration - so many of my friends gone to UK or USA .

    But anyone who believes we haven't got a whole new heap of snags now has their eyes and ears closed


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