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Nuos heat pump tank

  • 05-07-2018 9:17am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 467 ✭✭ raytaxi


    Hi looking to see if any one has fitted one of these tanks and thoughts on them ?
    I only have a oil and immersion heating for water at moment, was thinking of upgrading boiler to condenser and zoning heating to upstairs, downstairs and hot water, but it looks like it may mean taking up tile floors which not prepared to do. So was thinking of heat pump for summer and winter it be oil heated as well. Going to put in pumped showers for hot water use


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 107 ✭✭ Eminence


    raytaxi wrote: »
    Hi looking to see if any one has fitted one of these tanks and thoughts on them ?
    I only have a oil and immersion heating for water at moment, was thinking of upgrading boiler to condenser and zoning heating to upstairs, downstairs and hot water, but it looks like it may mean taking up tile floors which not prepared to do. So was thinking of heat pump for summer and winter it be oil heated as well. Going to put in pumped showers for hot water use
    Hi,
    As long as your pipes are visible somewhere in the house there will be no need to rip up any floors to zone heating.
    If you're thinking of replacing your oil boiler with something more efficient a high temperature heat pump is the way to go. Still offers all the advantages of heat pumps and directly fits into all components you alrsady have installed


  • Registered Users Posts: 467 ✭✭ raytaxi


    Sorry never heard of high temperature heat pump, is it one that works on older radiators ? Thought heat pumps were more for underfloor heating.
    Have you any recommendations or places for information ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 107 ✭✭ Eminence


    Hi There,
    Yes, most heat pumps are for underfloor heating but there are models which feature two refrigeration circuits therefore yielding a higher flow temperature and offering direc compatibility with older radiators (From experience i would still recommend replacing your radiators with aluminum radiators as they offer better heat transfer properties)

    Im a heating systems design engineer for a well known company in the business. If you need anything else don't hesitate to ask:)


  • Registered Users Posts: 520 ✭✭✭ Shaunoc


    Eminence wrote: »
    Hi There,
    Yes, most heat pumps are for underfloor heating but there are models which feature two refrigeration circuits therefore yielding a higher flow temperature and offering direc compatibility with older radiators (From experience i would still recommend replacing your radiators with aluminum radiators as they offer better heat transfer properties)

    Im a heating systems design engineer for a well known company in the business. If you need anything else don't hesitate to ask:)

    how do the costs compare vs traditional A2W heat pump, what is the efficiency also (COP / SPF), expected lifetime etc... just curious, not looking to buy


  • Registered Users Posts: 467 ✭✭ raytaxi


    What type of cost would this entail 11 radiators, new cylinder and heat pump. Would also be installing new showers to use up the hot water rather than electric showers.
    Eminence wrote: »
    Hi There,
    Yes, most heat pumps are for underfloor heating but there are models which feature two refrigeration circuits therefore yielding a higher flow temperature and offering direc compatibility with older radiators (From experience i would still recommend replacing your radiators with aluminum radiators as they offer better heat transfer properties)

    Im a heating systems design engineer for a well known company in the business. If you need anything else don't hesitate to ask:)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 107 ✭✭ Eminence


    Shaunoc wrote: »
    how do the costs compare vs traditional A2W heat pump, what is the efficiency also (COP / SPF), expected lifetime etc... just curious, not looking to buy

    The costs of the actual unit (im thinking an integrated split (outdoor fan unit and indoor cylinder unit with controls)) are similar if not the same of a low temperature unit.

    COP is comparable than to a low temperature splits and is most likely not enough to pass any building regulations but is the best option for any houses which have too high heat loss for a low temp unit or unwilling to put in underfloor / aluminum radiators or simply do not need to pass regulations


  • Registered Users Posts: 107 ✭✭ Eminence


    raytaxi wrote: »
    What type of cost would this entail 11 radiators, new cylinder and heat pump. Would also be installing new showers to use up the hot water rather than electric showers.

    Hi there.
    This entirely depends on your house parameters Hade you had a BER assessment completed on your house yet? I would be able to advise better if you have. If not, what is the size of the house, when was it built and have you carried out any energy upgrades already?


  • Registered Users Posts: 467 ✭✭ raytaxi


    Haven't done a ber yet, thought it was needed after works done to get the grants.
    List of things to be done :- increase attic insulation, cavity wall's to pumped insulation, upgrade heating to 3 zone, remove electric showers to pumped ones.
    Seems best idea may be to get ber first and see what is recommended ? Going by 2 similar house in same estate ber is d1 size wise 1300 sq ft approx.


  • Registered Users Posts: 107 ✭✭ Eminence


    As far as I know, there is a pre works and post works BER requirement for grants. It needs to show the improvement made for it to qualify.

    With regards to pumped showers, this can be done a multitude of ways
    1-Pressurized cold water storage tank (preferred) - Gives high pressure in all outlets in house
    2-Booster set after the tank (still a good method) - Gives high pressure in all outlets connected to booster set
    3-Individually pumped showers (wouldn't go this way) - Gives high pressure where pump is located.

    Ber D1 isn't great but allows for large improvements in grading therefore availing of grants.


  • Registered Users Posts: 467 ✭✭ raytaxi


    I was talking to plumbers about pressurised system but both seem set against it for some reason. Where are you based Eminence ? Could you maybe contact me on pm about this.


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