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Ireland 2040 plan results in high rise building being approved

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Comments



  • Mutant z wrote: »
    Its absolutely hilarious to hear objections to high rise in Dublin based on protecting the heritage of the city doesnt London have a heritage as well or is Dublin the only city in the world that has existed for the last millennium.

    It really makes the case for a properly directly elected mayor who can run on a vision for the entire city, rather than trying to get agreement amongst what 6 different councils?




  • Mutant z wrote: »
    Its absolutely hilarious to hear objections to high rise in Dublin based on protecting the heritage of the city doesnt London have a heritage as well or is Dublin the only city in the world that has existed for the last millennium.

    sure Paris and hundreds of other cities worldwide, far more impressive than dublin, dont have heritage and old buildings either :rolleyes:




  • Interesting comment from the above article:
    https://www.independent.ie/life/home-garden/ronan-lyons-wheres-the-plan-to-provide-20-new-homes-per-acre-in-dublin-36993600.html
    For apartments, think everything from purpose-built student accommodation and urban medium-to-high-rise right the way through to suburban low-rise for downsizers, as well as independent and assisted living complexes.

    Absolutely spot on. Here we seem to think that the only building should be a 3 to 4 bed semi-d and that should house everything from students, to young professionals, to families, to retired folks. It really makes no sense at all.

    Instead building a variety of different styles of apartments that focus on delivering peoples needs for different stages in their live.

    One thing I disagree with, I don't think they should all be in completely separate developments. I think for better social cohesion it is better to make all the above in the same developments. In particular I think elderly people can benefit greatly in sharing with young families. In mainland Europe, you see many apartment buildings have play grounds out the front of the building and you will often see elderly people relaxing outside keeping an eye on the kids while the parents are busy getting jobs down. Tends to be good for elderly people, kids and families.




  • I totally agree that developments specifically for retiree´s should be integrated with apartments for those a bit younger, and these certainly shouldn´t separate from houses. But this can only really apply to suburban brown and green field sites - given the size of the development. It pains me the amount of un-utilised inner city land, that would be perfect from apartments.

    I have a number of Finnish friends, and they are all a similar age to myself (late twenties), and when I visit them, they are all living in 1930s/40s apartment complexes, many of which contain large studios, alongside 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments (and only have one aspect!). I´d much prefer to own my own studio built to the Finnish standard, than continue to rent one bedroom in East Wall! On another note, the Scandinavian countries have one of the lowest rates of young adults living with parents!

    Finally, I really like what this developer does in the UK https://www.inspiredhomes.uk.com/




  • Sinn Fein are the majority of Dublin City Council?


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  • Sinn Fein are the majority of Dublin City Council?

    No, they’ve less than a quarter of the seats.




  • Zebra3 wrote: »
    No, they’ve less than a quarter of the seats.

    Sorry they have the most seats on Dublin City Council.




  • Sorry they have the most seats on Dublin City Council.

    I’m not really sure what your point is, if any.

    The attitude to high rise has been the same regardless of who is running the council.




  • Zebra3 wrote: »
    I’m not really sure what your point is, if any.

    The attitude to high rise has been the same regardless of who is running the council.

    Ill back this up, yes SF might have the majority of councilors but lets get real here AS IF FG, FF will support high density development beside all of the people they go to looking for votes every few years, they run on an anti development platform for f*ck sake!




  • Idbatterim wrote: »
    Ill back this up, yes SF might have the majority of councilors but lets get real here AS IF FG, FF will support high density development beside all of the people they go to looking for votes every few years, they run on an anti development platform for f*ck sake!

    Your post makes no sense to me.


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  • Nine-storey hotel approved. It's on the corner of Liffey Street Upper and Middle Abbey Street. An Taisce thought it would ruin the view from the Ha’penny Bridge.
    dVkeETg.jpg

    qhVYWHG.jpg




  • If An Taisce had being around during the construction of Newgrange they probably would have objected!




  • JohnC. wrote: »
    Nine-storey hotel approved. It's on the corner of Liffey Street Upper and Middle Abbey Street. An Taisce thought it would ruin the view from the Ha’penny Bridge.

    This is actually the second planning application in which An Taisce have been told to get lost in recent days.

    Aldborough House has been cleared for redevelopment, with only minor changes to the scheme, and that's despite the Department of Heritage, An Taisce, and the Irish Georgian Society all objecting to it.

    Personally, I'd prefer if these old structures were used to house museums or art galleries or something, but if the government aren't going to fund them, then offices are the next best thing.

    All in all though, it seems like the winds of change are blowing through An Bord Pleanála and Dublin City Council. I think both projects would have failed a couple of years back.




  • JohnC. wrote: »
    Nine-storey hotel approved. It's on the corner of Liffey Street Upper and Middle Abbey Street. An Taisce thought it would ruin the view from the Ha’penny Bridge.
    dVkeETg.jpg

    qhVYWHG.jpg

    Whatever about the height, but thats a horrible big clunky looking yolk. Could they not have broken up the facade vertically to keep it more in harmony with the narrow townhouses of the area? Modern architects are just beyond inept , seem to be unable to tell what makes a building look nice or even not ugly




  • roadmaster wrote: »
    If An Taisce had being around during the construction of Newgrange they probably would have objected!

    If boards had been around, there’d be plenty of “another waste of money, shur it’ll only be used once a year” threads!




  • Any new on Tara street tower. Has it been approved yet?




  • Stan27 wrote: »
    Any new on Tara street tower. Has it been approved yet?
    Rejected. Johnny Ronan said if it was Rejectedthat he’d go with the original rubbish scheme that has planning. (He said this while they were making decision on newer scheme) basically gave them a free pass. He should be challenging this in the courts given the total and utter farce it is. He has the money ...




  • Idbatterim wrote: »
    Stan27 wrote: »
    Any new on Tara street tower. Has it been approved yet?
    Rejected. Johnny Ronan said if it was Rejectedthat he’d go with the original rubbish scheme that has planning. (He said this while they were making decision on newer scheme) basically gave them a free pass. He should be challenging this in the courts given the total and utter farce it is. He has the money ...

    Yes pure ridiculous at this stage. Makes 100% sence for Dublin to go high-rise!! we are expanding The city further out into the countryside yet do not have public transport sufficient enough for this. The only Lodgic way to fix this is build up.
    The country is shooting itself in the foot!!!!!!




  • An utter shambles.

    DCC: here's a local area plan including this specific site which would be suitable for high rise

    Developer: lets have 15 meetings with DCC and thrash out an acceptable high rise design

    DCC: Ok

    15 excruciating, nit picking meetings later all parties are satisfied, planning submitted.

    DCC: rejected as height is excessive

    JR is well within his rights to sue for time and money wasted.




  • cgcsb wrote: »
    An utter shambles.

    DCC: here's a local area plan including this specific site which would be suitable for high rise

    Developer: lets have 15 meetings with DCC and thrash out an acceptable high rise design

    DCC: Ok

    15 excruciating, nit picking meetings later all parties are satisfied, planning submitted.

    DCC: rejected as height is excessive

    JR is well within his rights to sue for time and money wasted.
    you see by not doing this he is letting them off the hook. The word "planning" in Ireland, brings an entirely new meaning to the word. If he challenges them in the courts, it would bring to mass attention, what a farce the entire system is...


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  • Idbatterim wrote: »
    you see by not doing this he is letting them off the hook. The word "planning" in Ireland, brings an entirely new meaning to the word. If he challenges them in the courts, it would bring to mass attention, what a farce the entire system is...

    DCC privatized waste collection, Irish water removed their water services portfolio, the NTA took on the important parts of the traffic and transport portfolio due to decades of gross incompetence, they don't actually do street sweeping and maintenance anymore except on a handful of streets when it is super convenient to do so.

    The only thing they have left is planning and they are contradicting themselves on that front. Just get rid I say, and start from scratch with a new metropolitan area council with an elected mayor and a clear set of powers and responsibilities.




  • cgcsb wrote: »
    DCC privatized waste collection, Irish water removed their water services portfolio, the NTA took on the important parts of the traffic and transport portfolio due to decades of gross incompetence, they don't actually do street sweeping and maintenance anymore except on a handful of streets when it is super convenient to do so.
    Councillors constantly complain that not enough power is left at local level.

    And yet anything I've ever seen them do, they do badly.

    The pictures circulating on social media of overflowing bins in hot weather in Dublin is a case in point. Yes, Irish people are generally messy. But how hard is it to arrange for extra litter picking and changing of bins when there is demand?




  • Bray Head wrote: »
    Councillors constantly complain that not enough power is left at local level.

    And yet anything I've ever seen them do, they do badly.

    The pictures circulating on social media of overflowing bins in hot weather in Dublin is a case in point. Yes, Irish people are generally messy. But how hard is it to arrange for extra litter picking and changing of bins when there is demand?

    Frequency of bins is one thing, at least they actually change them SOMETIMES. There are vast swathes of the City that literally see no maintenance at all.

    One particularly grinding example is James Joyce Bridge. Abandoned since it was opened now has grass growing out of it's drains and most of it's lights and glass panels are broken.

    Don't get me started on the vandalism that was done to Grafton street with that scruffy paving they put in, an utter embarrassment when you see tourists looking at the dark stains on it :rolleyes:




  • I was in Galway a couple of weeks ago and enjoyed the lovely traffic. When i was there i seen what i taught was a possibility of designing one of our cities with not skyscrapers but 6/7 story well designed building and public services such as shops, parks and most importantly good quick public transport. Take for example between Renmore and Oranmore along the coast there is plenty of green fields that would sustain the need for Galways housing for many years to come. The rail line between Ceannt and Oranmore is give or take 7km. It could be electrified with additional stations built along the route to service the new housing. But probably building close to coast is a no no


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