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500 emails to rent a small 1 bed in Dublin.

24

Comments



  • ELM327 wrote:
    Up the price, make hay while the sun shines, and enjoy living in a capitalist society.


    Slime




  • Couple of factors that never get discussed in the housing crisis.
    (i) There are 100'000 overseas students in Ireland, majority in Dublin. Out of the population of people looking for accomodation at any given time, they are a very very big part.
    (ii) This is a matter of fact, not opinion so if you want to challenge it, challenge it on factual lines. The HAP system provides massive benefits to tenants that are eligible. But there is zero benefit to landlords. HAP is basically saying- people on low wages "we will give you a subsidy such that you can afford the same level of housing as someone on a much higher wage". Now being able to afford housing, and being able to get housing are two different things. What in effect is happening is that the HAP person uses the subsidy to try to outbid the person who is in a middle income job. The middle income person has to pay up to the max that the HAP person can afford. And at that point, the landlord inevitably says - well I have a choice here between one tenant where I have to fill out a load of forms, get authorisations from my bank, make my property open to inspections every two months, and be dealing with both the state and the tenant if the tenant decides to stop paying their share - and another person where I can just sign a lease and away we go..........which is more attractive for the landlord in your opinion?




  • ELM327 wrote: »
    Up the price, make hay while the sun shines, and enjoy living in a capitalist society.

    Until there’s a crash and the banks are bailed out again.




  • gar32 wrote:
    China have a robot 3D printer using concrete that can make a 2 bed in 2 days. Finished of with internal work in a week.


    Interesting ideas (overall).

    I like many, feel that we need to build up and not constantly out. Infrastructure will be required regardless but many plots in Dublin city centre are either sparsely populated or derelict. Keep building out and we'll have longer commute times and no countryside left.

    It's clear however that rents in Dublin are ludicrous. As or more expensive than the likes of Zurich city yet of lower quality and lower salaries i'd wager. How many people are putting 50%+ of net earnings into rental?




  • gar32 wrote: »
    Idea's at coming out of every where.

    China have a robot 3D printer using concrete that can make a 2 bed in 2 days. Finished of with internal work in a week.

    You can buy a prefabbed 1, 2 or 3 bedroom house in Italy that has a 20 years guarantee from €35k- €80 which don't need foundations and are off the grid. Water is rain collected, Solar panels, a rated for power and heat. Just need a tank for waste water or a link to city waste system.

    In Hong kong you can buy a small room studio for €15k in a block with 10,000 rooms. This could be done for students or even close too large companies for people until they get something better.

    There are house & home not being used in Ireland. It has been suggested to tax them if empty. Force people to use what is is there!!!

    I could go on and on and on.

    €330,000 for a house is not going to work for over 80% of people in and around Dublin!!!

    This is not a Dublin problem. Its an issue in any city with major international industries.

    London
    New York
    Stockholm
    Amsterdam
    Sydney
    Luxembourg
    San Francisco

    etc etc etc

    However only in Ireland is it perceived as a purely local issue.


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  • ELM327 wrote: »
    He said "to get a house next to mammy".
    I read that as the typical "turning down viable houses" case.

    I didnt see a different way of reading that. Perhaps I've missed something :confused:

    Del suggested that an appropriate solution would be for the "whole family" to move to a lower demand area. I assumed he meant "including Mammy" and questioned whether she would be happy to do this, being an independent adult with social ties to the area.

    And you then posted, rather oddly, that my response was irrelevant.

    Perhaps you quoted the wrong post.




  • @OP Was it literally 500 emails?




  • Until there’s a crash and the banks are bailed out again.
    I don't agree with that either....
    But it's not relevant to the discussion at hand.
    Lumen wrote: »
    Del suggested that an appropriate solution would be for the "whole family" to move to a lower demand area. I assumed he meant "including Mammy" and questioned whether she would be happy to do this, being an independent adult with social ties to the area.

    And you then posted, rather oddly, that my response was irrelevant.

    Perhaps you quoted the wrong post.
    I assumed the whole family did not exclude extended family. You can't, after all, compel a self-funding member of society who has bought their own property to move house.

    I did not quote the wrong post, I see now we read it differently. My comment is directed at those who refuse a free (or token contribution) house.




  • Tombo2001 wrote: »
    This is not a Dublin problem. Its an issue in any city with major international industries.

    London
    New York
    Stockholm
    Amsterdam
    Sydney
    Luxembourg
    San Francisco

    etc etc etc

    However only in Ireland is it perceived as a purely local issue.

    Ireland is nowhere in the category of world cities. And people in those places do complain about house prices.

    Why not compare Dublin to Manchester?




  • Ireland is nowhere in the category of world cities. And people in those places do complain about house prices.

    Why not compare Dublin to Manchester?
    Because Dublin is our capital city and as such the correct relevant comparison is London.
    Have you tried sourcing property in London these days?

    I have.. assisting our London office for new staff. And I can tell you, it's so much of a nightmare that we provide accomodation for the first 4-6 weeks for a new starter that is from outside the area and also offer to give salary advances for deposits.


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  • ELM327 wrote: »
    I don't agree with that either....
    But it's not relevant to the discussion at hand.

    It is if you are promoting “capitalism”. Renters are paying for the bailout. The bailout caused by the collapse in capitalism. Without that bailout property would be worthless.




  • Ireland is nowhere in the category of world cities. And people in those places do complain about house prices.

    Why not compare Dublin to Manchester?

    Dont know what you mean "nowhere in the category of" thats incredibly vague and no grounds for basing an argument.

    Dublin has a massive amount of international businesses employing international people. Facebook, Google, Ebay, State Street, Citi, SAP, Intel ......massive international businesses that employ hundreds of thousands in Dublin city and its surrounds.

    It has an international workforce, and that is impacting on the housing market.

    Thats a characteristic of the cities I mentioned. its not a characteristic of Manchester. Comparing Dublin to Manchester is Apples and Oranges.

    And yes people in those places complain about house prices; but nowhere on the level seen in Ireland, even though San Francisco or Luxembourg would be far more unaffordable than Dublin.




  • ELM327 wrote: »
    Because Dublin is our capital city and as such the correct relevant comparison is London.
    Have you tried sourcing property in London these days?

    Nonsense. The word “capital” doesn’t make a city ten times bigger. And Berlin is cheap enough while San Francisco isn’t a capital. There’s no relationship between being a capital and housing.
    I have.. assisting our London office for new staff. And I can tell you, it's so much of a nightmare that we provide accomodation for the first 4-6 weeks for a new starter that is from outside the area and also offer to give salary advances for deposits.

    Wow. Thanks for the heads up. If I hadn’t lived there I wouldn’t know. London is a world city like New York (also not a capital).

    Irrelevant. Dublin shouldn’t be as expense and shouldn’t aim to use London as an excuse.

    (Also London has probably peaked.)




  • Tombo2001 wrote: »
    Dont know what you mean "nowhere in the category of" thats incredibly vague and no grounds for basing an argument.

    It’s a small city. Not a world city.
    Dublin has a massive amount of international businesses employing international people. Facebook, Google, Ebay, State Street, Citi, SAP, Intel ......massive international businesses that employ hundreds of thousands in Dublin city and its surrounds.

    That’s not the reason for high prices. If it were prices would never have dropped post 2008. It’s supply and demand.
    It has an international workforce, and that is impacting on the housing market.

    That’s also a supply and demand mismatch.
    Thats a characteristic of the cities I mentioned. its not a characteristic of Manchester. Comparing Dublin to Manchester is Apples and Oranges.

    Similar sized provincial working class cities. They are historically far more similar than Dublin is to London.
    And yes people in those places complain about house prices; but nowhere on the level seen in Ireland, even though San Francisco or Luxembourg would be far more unaffordable than Dublin.

    It’s causing attacks on the buses ferrying IT workers in San Francisco, and seen a resurgence of the Labour Party in London. A Labour Party that promises massive house building. Of course people complain in those countries.

    In fact Silicon Valley is worried that people are leaving. The net migration is zero. There are articles on this literally every day in the mercury news and the chronicle.




  • Wow. Thanks for the heads up. If I hadn’t lived there I wouldn’t know. London is a world city like New York (also not a capital).

    Irrelevant. Dublin shouldn’t be as expense and shouldn’t aim to use London as an excuse.

    (Also London has probably peaked.)
    This sort of argument over the nature of Dublin vs London ignores the fact that Londoners also believe they have a housing crisis!

    London is not any kind of model to be emulated.

    https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/jan/29/can-you-really-save-for-a-deposit-by-ditching-coffee-and-avocado-toast-i-tried-to-find-out

    Forget about houses, in London it is impossible for a person of ordinary means at ordinary property-buying age (established career, late 20s) to buy a one-bed apartment.




  • It’s a small city. Not a world city.



    That’s not the reason for high prices. If it were prices would never have dropped post 2008. It’s supply and demand.



    That’s also a supply and demand mismatch.



    Similar sized provincial working class cities. They are historically far more similar than Dublin is to London.



    It’s causing attacks on the buses ferrying IT workers in San Francisco, and seen a resurgence of the Labour Party in London. A Labour Party that promises massive house building. Of course people complain in those countries.

    In fact Silicon Valley is worried that people are leaving. The net migration is zero. There are articles on this literally every day in the mercury news and the chronicle.

    (i) You insist on dealing in Vague.....its a small city is not a World city...... what does this mean?

    Mexico City has 20 million people. Buenos Aires has 15 million. They dont have housing crises....... You are not making a point here at all.

    (ii) Historically doesnt come into it. Historically people lived in farms.

    (iii) There's a supply and demand mismatch. Correct, there sure is.

    (iv) Re 2008 - cast your mind back to that time - remember the PIIGS economies? Portugal, Ireland, Italy, Greece, Spain? Which is the only one thats had a strong recovery? Which is the only one that has a strong international industry base? ireland

    How is Naples doing.....plenty of houses there; what about Madrid; no shortage apartments in Madrid. But all the young Madristas want to leave; and huge chunks of them are coming to Dublin. And Athens?

    (v) As for your final point; I never said people in those cities were happy with the housing market. My point is, only in Ireland is it perceived as a local issue.




  • gar32 wrote: »
    Idea's at coming out of every where.

    In Hong kong you can buy a small room studio for €15k

    Given that there are no longer any flats to rent for less than €1k per month, I would be very surprised if you could buy a flat in Hong Kong for €15k.




  • Tombo2001 wrote:
    Couple of factors that never get discussed in the housing crisis. (i) There are 100'000 overseas students in Ireland, majority in Dublin. Out of the population of people looking for accomodation at any given time, they are a very very big part. (ii) This is a matter of fact, not opinion so if you want to challenge it, challenge it on factual lines.

    The fact is that many, if not all those students are staying in single room digs. They're not really adding to the problem.




  • The fact is that many, if not all those students are staying in single room digs. They're not really adding to the problem.

    i take your point; but single room digs are part of the supply of accomodation, and also plenty of international students are staying in apartments.

    You put an ad for an apartment in Daft, a heap of replies will be from international student......

    Its definitely a factor.


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  • Thinking out of the box is needed. The days of a 3 bed with garden are over.




  • gar32 wrote: »
    Thinking out of the box is needed. The days of a 3 bed with garden are over.

    You seen a lot of ample gardens in recent estates? Because I see dense housing, front gardens that are the car parking, narrow roads and small back gardens. Even if you apply for planning right now, the planning office looks for density and use of space..




  • gar32 wrote: »

    This is not an actual thing. It is a concept. There are some pretty renders and that's about all. As far as I know, no one is building these and no one is living on them (other than proof-of-concept single units).

    The idea is that you can construct and fit out the unit for $15000. You still need land, services, decks and all the rest of it. I have my doubts about the pricing myself. I can't see how you could do the 'feature' circular glazing at the ends inside that budget.

    You can probably deliver demountable accommodation for €50,000 a unit. We should do this certainly as a stop-gap.




  • gar32 wrote: »
    When are the people going to get FG / FF to do something about housing ???

    People are too stupid to do anything about it. They will vote FF / FG and even if they will be forced to live in dog kennels...
    gar32 wrote: »
    Thinking out of the box is needed. The days of a 3 bed with garden are over.

    Not for everyone - if you know proper people you will easily get good job for good money and banks will crawl to lend you money for "3 bed with garden"...




  • gar32 wrote: »
    facehugger99 So money to pay back France & Germany for the banks mistakes is OK but to get people a roof over their head it not? Housing is a human right and with the weather in Ireland it has to be LOL

    Housing is available at affordable rates.

    Just not where you want to be.

    Housing as a human right does not extend to being close to mammy.




  • Tombo2001 wrote: »
    Mexico City has 20 million people. Buenos Aires has 15 million. They dont have housing crises....... You are not making a point here at all.

    Both of those have massive slums.....No housing crisis you say?




  • El Tarangu wrote: »
    Given that there are no longer any flats to rent for less than €1k per month, I would be very surprised if you could buy a flat in Hong Kong for €15k.

    15k in Hong Kong gets you one of these....

    https://www.google.ie/search?q=hong+kong+coffin+apartments&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjDpZeF8OvZAhUUa8AKHUh1CIwQ_AUICigB&biw=1920&bih=989




  • CruelCoin wrote: »
    Housing is available at affordable rates.

    Just not where you want to be.

    Housing as a human right does not extend to being close to mammy.

    This way we can trumpet solving all social problems in Ireland:
    - Housing - we have empty houses in Leitrim.
    - Healthcare - we have lot of paracetamol and flat seven up.
    - Poverty - we have lot of vacancies for highly skilled IT specialists.
    - Crime - we have safe places to live and work in Dublin 4.




  • gar32 wrote: »
    They are working in the banks now trying to get you to save 40% of the price of an over price 3 bed before you pay the highest interest rates in Europe on the rest.

    How it should be

    Deposit part

    People might pay mortgages then

    Its like free money to some


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  • CruelCoin wrote: »
    Both of those have massive slums.....No housing crisis you say?

    They dont have rents shooting through the roof. Apples and apples please.


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