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Has rugby become the "people's game"?

  • 06-03-2018 3:02pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 14,967 ✭✭✭✭ The Lost Sheep


    Surprised this conversation from last night's Against The Head hasnt been discussed more.

    Daire O'Brien claimed that support and interest in rugby now resembles the interest generated by the Jack Charlton era and hurling in the mid-90s despite playing numbers in the sport being considerably less than soccer and gaelic games.

    O’Brien said: "Every crevasse of Irish life… everybody goes somewhere to watch the game, everybody has an opinion. Arguably, it’s the people’s game."

    Eddie O'Sullivan then talked about who attends games and how that has changed and the provinces are now a lot of peoples club team and clubs are affected quite a bit by that

    Bernard Jackman talked about employment of all the development officers and the work theyve put in to bring sport to kids getting access to sport for maybe the first time
    https://www.independent.ie/sport/poll-has-rugby-become-the-peoples-game-in-ireland-36675522.html

    How many here regularly or even occasionally attend games in their local club?
    Numbers playing in youths rugby has increased and in schools but major issues in adult game. Club game has some support but its far from very high and close to the peoples game.

    Thoughts?


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 37,978 irishbucsfan


    I would say that no, for the most part, it is not. Definitely not.

    However in some small pockets of the country it is, and its spreading. Still quite slowly I would say.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,930 jr86


    Daire O'Brien claimed that support and interest in rugby now resembles the interest generated by the Jack Charlton era

    Didn't see it last night, but he's absolutely way off with this

    Not alone the Jack Charlton era but even recently

    I went to see Ireland's six nations decider with France in 2014 in a Galway City centre pub on a fine Saturday evening - most pubs around were busy but not rammed. Ireland's matches with Italy (Wednesday night) and France (Sunday afternoon) at Euro 2016 had queues out the door before kick off from the same pubs.

    I'd imagine it was pretty much the same across the country

    I still think Rugby overall - while it has grown in mainstream popularity hugely over the last decade - is way off the popularity of soccer in the country


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,823 ✭✭✭✭ Riskymove


    I would say that no, for the most part, it is not. Definitely not.

    i think the viewoing audiences for 6N (when wagon in full force) would equal the viewing of soccer at present given the different levels the teams are at


    I mean a Grandlsam effort on Paddys Day in Twickers is going to a massive once off event if it happens

    however that does not transfer to Province or Club

    and anyways GAA would still beat both I'd say


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,585 irishfan9


    No.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,542 ✭✭✭ delta_bravo


    No absolutely not. It can be quickly debunked by just looking at the playing populations in comparison with other sports.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,059 ✭✭✭ Uriel.


    No absolutely not. It can be quickly debunked by just looking at the playing populations in comparison with other sports.

    To be fair to the panel discussion this is exactly what they were saying.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,680 ✭✭✭ rizzee


    I think it's a matter of supporting ones' country. Not a big rugby fan myself but I do enjoy watching Ireland play and following the Six Nations in particular, as it's usually an excuse to head out! I have absolutely no interest or desire to watch League Rugby. I would also agree that the popularity is slowly growing (maybe with the Six Nations being on) and being a long way behind football.

    International Rugby > League of Ireland. But that's another debate.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,046 ✭✭✭ arsebiscuits1


    A good soundbite and steers some deserved credit to those who have developed the grassroots and professional level games.

    But "The People's Game" I don't feel it is.

    That's not to say it's a failure. I think the IRFU, the Provinces, the Clubs and the fans can be very proud of their sport.


  • Registered Users Posts: 37,978 irishbucsfan


    No absolutely not. It can be quickly debunked by just looking at the playing populations in comparison with other sports.

    Well that makes me question what "People's game" means. Whether its what people watch, or what people play.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,542 ✭✭✭ delta_bravo


    Well that makes me question what "People's game" means. Whether its what people watch, or what people play.

    Up for debate I suppose. Generally soccer gets higher viewership when they get to a decent event however if you look at the 2 sports in terms of who goes to the games you might say Rugby has more women watching the games compared to Soccer based on what I've seen going to see both sports in the Aviva. So you could argue it is more representative of the general population. Could take it either way really


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  • Registered Users Posts: 14,967 ✭✭✭✭ The Lost Sheep


    A good soundbite and steers some deserved credit to those who have developed the grassroots and professional level games.

    But "The People's Game" I don't feel it is.

    That's not to say it's a failure. I think the IRFU, the Provinces, the Clubs and the fans can be very proud of their sport.
    Yes they can be proud but how many people here regularly or even occasionally attend club games or attend any game that isnt professional?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,282 ✭✭✭ Dubinusa


    Can't believe how few Irish play in the premiership. When I left in 85, there were so many irish in the 1st division. Liverpool, man United and arsenal come to mind. The national team was pretty good. But then again, there's not too many English playing top tier football.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,976 ✭✭✭ DavyD_83


    rizzee wrote: »
    I think it's a matter of supporting ones' country. Not a big rugby fan myself but I do enjoy watching Ireland play and following the Six Nations in particular, as it's usually an excuse to head out! I have absolutely no interest or desire to watch League Rugby. I would also agree that the popularity is slowly growing (maybe with the Six Nations being on) and being a long way behind football.

    International Rugby > League of Ireland. But that's another debate.

    Surely it's more about the bandwagon mentality when the national team is doing well, and the related extra push in media and marketing that comes with it.
    I could be wrong, but I somehow doubt yourself, or the nouveau rugby fans have the same interest in the Irish hockey or ultimate Frisbee teams. Both of which I believe do quite well internationally.

    Fro the record, I care as little as I always have about all national teams in all sports equally.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,440 ✭✭✭ The Rape of Lucretia


    I think not, and bloody well hope not.

    The 'people' have their round ball games. It suits them fine - one, the dullest game immaginable with scores as rare as hen's teeth played by actor-divers, the other, one that in a hundred years hasnt solved its problem of having no real rules and become a jersey pulling, who's the hardest man shoulder bumping contest with not a fraction of skill being required to succeed at it. Both suit the type of people who play it - inner city bowsies supporting and wearing English club shirts despite generally hating everything English, and, country bumpkins for whom it is an extension of 'bragging rights' contesting when not at 3am outside the local town dive 'disco', when it is decided by fists, much as in the game, only its the Gardai rather than a ref looking on helplessly.

    But rugby. Well. A genteman's game. Such variety of skills, tactics, teamwork, physiques, providing an endlessly enthralling contest, in a game where the rules work, moments of thrilling skill, speed, and quick thinking to take the breath away, and the best team generally wins. And played the by right sort of chaps of course.

    We like it just as it is thank you very much. Hopefully it never becomes 'the peoples game'.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,967 ✭✭✭✭ The Lost Sheep


    Dubinusa wrote: »
    Can't believe how few Irish play in the premiership. When I left in 85, there were so many irish in the 1st division. Liverpool, man United and arsenal come to mind. The national team was pretty good. But then again, there's not too many English playing top tier football.
    But as you say there is far less english playing top tier in england. Premiership has changed everything.
    I think not, and bloody well hope not.

    The 'people' have their round ball games. It suits them fine - one, the dullest game immaginable with scores as rare as hen's teeth played by actor-divers, the other, one that in a hundred years hasnt solved its problem of having no real rules and become a jersey pulling, who's the hardest man shoulder bumping contest with not a fraction of skill being required to succeed at it. Both suit the type of people who play it - inner city bowsies supporting and wearing English club shirts despite generally hating everything English, and, country bumpkins for whom it is an extension of 'bragging rights' contesting when not at 3am outside the local town dive 'disco', when it is decided by fists, much as in the game, only its the Gardai rather than a ref looking on helplessly.

    But rugby. Well. A genteman's game. Such variety of skills, tactics, teamwork, physiques, providing an endlessly enthralling contest, in a game where the rules work, moments of thrilling skill, speed, and quick thinking to take the breath away, and the best team generally wins. And played the by right sort of chaps of course.

    We like it just as it is thank you very much. Hopefully it never becomes 'the peoples game'.
    Surprised you havent caught anyone yet....


  • Registered Users Posts: 920 ✭✭✭ Joe prim


    I think not, and bloody well hope not.

    The 'people' have their round ball games. It suits them fine - one, the dullest game immaginable with scores as rare as hen's teeth played by actor-divers, the other, one that in a hundred years hasnt solved its problem of having no real rules and become a jersey pulling, who's the hardest man shoulder bumping contest with not a fraction of skill being required to succeed at it. Both suit the type of people who play it - inner city bowsies supporting and wearing English club shirts despite generally hating everything English, and, country bumpkins for whom it is an extension of 'bragging rights' contesting when not at 3am outside the local town dive 'disco', when it is decided by fists, much as in the game, only its the Gardai rather than a ref looking on helplessly.

    But rugby. Well. A genteman's game. Such variety of skills, tactics, teamwork, physiques, providing an endlessly enthralling contest, in a game where the rules work, moments of thrilling skill, speed, and quick thinking to take the breath away, and the best team generally wins. And played the by right sort of chaps of course.

    We like it just as it is thank you very much. Hopefully it never becomes 'the peoples game'.



    You are either Charles O.Carroll-Kelly or George Hook, and I claim my fiver!


  • Registered Users Posts: 134 ✭✭ dmn22


    I think not, and bloody well hope not.

    The 'people' have their round ball games. It suits them fine - one, the dullest game immaginable with scores as rare as hen's teeth played by actor-divers, the other, one that in a hundred years hasnt solved its problem of having no real rules and become a jersey pulling, who's the hardest man shoulder bumping contest with not a fraction of skill being required to succeed at it. Both suit the type of people who play it - inner city bowsies supporting and wearing English club shirts despite generally hating everything English, and, country bumpkins for whom it is an extension of 'bragging rights' contesting when not at 3am outside the local town dive 'disco', when it is decided by fists, much as in the game, only its the Gardai rather than a ref looking on helplessly.

    But rugby. Well. A genteman's game. Such variety of skills, tactics, teamwork, physiques, providing an endlessly enthralling contest, in a game where the rules work, moments of thrilling skill, speed, and quick thinking to take the breath away, and the best team generally wins. And played the by right sort of chaps of course.

    We like it just as it is thank you very much. Hopefully it never becomes 'the peoples game'.

    :rolleyes: i wonder where people get the idea rugby is for classist, pretentious snobs with such an unbiased opinion as the one above


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,308 ✭✭✭✭ prawnsambo


    Joe prim wrote: »
    You are either Charles O.Carroll-Kelly or George Hook, and I claim my fiver!
    dmn22 wrote: »
    :rolleyes: i wonder where people get the idea rugby is for classist, pretentious snobs with such an unbiased opinion as the one above
    Another couple of notches on TRoL's gunbelt. :D


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 17,927 Mod ✭✭✭✭ CatFromHue


    I would have said no outright but when you look at the TV viewership numbers for 2015 and 2016 football is ahead but not by a huge amount. 2015 had the RWC and 2016 had Euro 2016 so you can compare big tournament games for both sports.
    0000001.png

    [url]tv.JPG[/url]


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 15,519 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Neil3030


    All Ireland finals draw less than a World Cup pools match. Rugby >> GAA - proven irrefutably. :pac:


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  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 17,927 Mod ✭✭✭✭ CatFromHue


    GAA would beat rugby hands down for playing numbers etc but NFL in America is largely a watched as opposed to played game.

    So who knows.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,967 ✭✭✭✭ The Lost Sheep


    CatFromHue wrote: »
    GAA would beat rugby hands down for playing numbers etc but NFL in America is largely a watched as opposed to played game.

    So who knows.
    There's a lot of people here that follow rugby that are quite like NFL players/supporters in that they played in high school/college then just become supporters and dont play anything bar maybe tag/flag football.


  • Site Banned Posts: 7 ✭✭✭ grass_cutter


    I think not, and bloody well hope not.

    The 'people' have their round ball games. It suits them fine - one, the dullest game immaginable with scores as rare as hen's teeth played by actor-divers, the other, one that in a hundred years hasnt solved its problem of having no real rules and become a jersey pulling, who's the hardest man shoulder bumping contest with not a fraction of skill being required to succeed at it. Both suit the type of people who play it - inner city bowsies supporting and wearing English club shirts despite generally hating everything English, and, country bumpkins for whom it is an extension of 'bragging rights' contesting when not at 3am outside the local town dive 'disco', when it is decided by fists, much as in the game, only its the Gardai rather than a ref looking on helplessly.

    But rugby. Well. A genteman's game. Such variety of skills, tactics, teamwork, physiques, providing an endlessly enthralling contest, in a game where the rules work, moments of thrilling skill, speed, and quick thinking to take the breath away, and the best team generally wins. And played the by right sort of chaps of course.

    We like it just as it is thank you very much. Hopefully it never becomes 'the peoples game'.


    funny cause its true


    rugby is more a lifestyle , a statement about where you come from ( and where you hope to go ) than a sport and i dont mean to sound cynical or sarcastic when i say that , i didnt grow up in rugby country but i lived and worked in new zealand for a good while so know a bit about it , now rugby is the peoples game in new zealand but bar it and wales , its not the peoples game anywhere else

    thats ok by the way


  • Site Banned Posts: 7 ✭✭✭ grass_cutter


    CatFromHue wrote: »
    GAA would beat rugby hands down for playing numbers etc but NFL in America is largely a watched as opposed to played game.

    So who knows.

    at organised level , GAA beats soccer out the gate too , a kick about with eight guys behind a supermarket is sometimes counted as playing soccer , when i was a kid we always always played soccer at break time in school but i never played organised soccer , i played organised gaa from i was nine


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 30,309 Mod ✭✭✭✭ .ak


    I think not, and bloody well hope not.

    The 'people' have their round ball games. It suits them fine - one, the dullest game immaginable with scores as rare as hen's teeth played by actor-divers, the other, one that in a hundred years hasnt solved its problem of having no real rules and become a jersey pulling, who's the hardest man shoulder bumping contest with not a fraction of skill being required to succeed at it. Both suit the type of people who play it - inner city bowsies supporting and wearing English club shirts despite generally hating everything English, and, country bumpkins for whom it is an extension of 'bragging rights' contesting when not at 3am outside the local town dive 'disco', when it is decided by fists, much as in the game, only its the Gardai rather than a ref looking on helplessly.

    But rugby. Well. A genteman's game. Such variety of skills, tactics, teamwork, physiques, providing an endlessly enthralling contest, in a game where the rules work, moments of thrilling skill, speed, and quick thinking to take the breath away, and the best team generally wins. And played the by right sort of chaps of course.

    We like it just as it is thank you very much. Hopefully it never becomes 'the peoples game'.

    Obvious troll is obvious.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,030 ✭✭✭✭ Squidgy Black


    rizzee wrote: »
    International Rugby > League of Ireland. But that's another debate.

    You can't compare a professional sport to a semi-pro/amateur league. Fairer comparison would be AIL to the LOI.

    I think rugby has taken leaps and bounds in Ireland in becoming more popular throughout the country but it's definitely nowhere near soccer levels, but viewing wise it's increased greatly over the past 10 years or so. Hasn't been reflected in playing numbers though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,967 ✭✭✭✭ The Lost Sheep


    You can't compare a professional sport to a semi-pro/amateur league. Fairer comparison would be AIL to the LOI.

    I think rugby has taken leaps and bounds in Ireland in becoming more popular throughout the country but it's definitely nowhere near soccer levels, but viewing wise it's increased greatly over the past 10 years or so. Hasn't been reflected in playing numbers though.
    It has in playing numbers of kids/teenagers but not in the adult game.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,503 ✭✭✭ wicklowwonder


    CatFromHue wrote: »
    I would have said no outright but when you look at the TV viewership numbers for 2015 and 2016 football is ahead but not by a huge amount. 2015 had the RWC and 2016 had Euro 2016 so you can compare big tournament games for both sports.
    0000001.png

    [url]tv.JPG[/url]

    But yet 2017 GAA and football rule the roost.

    https://www.rte.ie/entertainment/2018/0109/932142-rte-had-top-20-most-viewed-tv-shows-in-ireland-in-2017/

    Thing is looking over last 10 years is probably a better reflection, GAA All-Ireland Finals are the only constant with one if not both hurling and football finals year on year almost always in top 5 most viewed shows. The other sports rise and fall depending on the success of the team (band wagon).

    This year I imagine GAA will be huge. New structures will see the top teams on TV more often v each other, and the novelty factor in both codes. No ireland in the World Cup in football. Rugby will be interesting, will people make the switch to TV3 on Patrick’s Day if it is Grand Slam decider? Will the casual fan tune in or will family events take over?

    The figures for TV3 wouldn’t be fantastic so far for the “people’s sport” with 647k watching ireland v wales and with 571,500 wacthing Ireland v france. Both down on last years figures on RTE, both games pulled in over 800k viewers last year.

    The 6 Nations is probably also a fairer reflection versus GAA All-Ireland finals as they occur year on year and not a once in every 4 year cycle.

    Soccer is still a huge pull factor but it is massively dependent on the success of the international team.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 12,049 Mod ✭✭✭✭ riffmongous


    God I almost forgot the clubs even existed. Do they ever get any nationwide attention anymore? I remember years ago you'd see the results on the aertel and the odd clip on tv


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,240 ✭✭✭ Jimbob1977


    When Ireland are playing in an international soccer competition, there are flags on houses, the streets become quieter at kickoff time and it's a huge topic of conversation everywhere.

    You just don't see it with rugby. People watch the matches, but there is no blanket enthusiasm.

    And unfortunately GAA has no international outlet, apart from that made-up Compromise Rules.

    Soccer and GAA are miles bigger than rugby


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