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Feed the wildlife.

  • 02-03-2018 10:54am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 630 ✭✭✭ Markgc


    Okay so many people are having a good time with the snow and a couple days off work. Good on you. Enjoy it.
    The wildlife though has a difficult time in these conditions with snow measuring half a meter in depth in places, creating great difficulty for it to find food.
    Give a hand and help it survive.

    This is a tough time for birds. Keen gardeners will know that their natural food source has been depleted, leaving our feathered friends struggling to find food under the heavy cover of snow. They need all the help they can get.

    They will eat seeds bread and apples.
    DO NOT FEED THEM PORRIDGE OATS. When wet this can glue their beaks shut, starving them to death.

    Foxes like cooked or raw meat and tinned pet food. Foxes also like other savoury items such as cheese, table scraps, bread soaked in fat, fruit and cooked vegetables.

    Also call-in to elderly neighbours.

    Thanks for taking the time.
    Stay safe.


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Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,148 ✭✭✭ amadangomor


    Markgc wrote: »
    Okay so many people are having a good time with the snow and a couple days off work. Good on you. Enjoy it.
    The wildlife though has a difficult time in these conditions with snow measuring half a meter in depth in places, creating great difficulty for it to find food.
    Give a hand and help it survive.

    This is a tough time for birds. Keen gardeners will know that their natural food source has been depleted, leaving our feathered friends struggling to find food under the heavy cover of snow. They need all the help they can get.

    They will eat seeds bread and apples.
    DO NOT FEED THEM PORRIDGE OATS. When wet this can glue their beaks shut, starving them to death.

    Foxes like cooked or raw meat and tinned pet food. Foxes also like other savoury items such as cheese, table scraps, bread soaked in fat, fruit and cooked vegetables.

    Also call-in to elderly neighbours.

    Thanks for taking the time.
    Stay safe.

    Are raw oats ok?


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,070 ✭✭✭✭ fryup


    Markgc wrote: »
    DO NOT FEED THEM PORRIDGE OATS. When wet this can glue their beaks shut, starving them to death.

    really:confused: first i heard of that


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,148 ✭✭✭ amadangomor


    fryup wrote: »
    really:confused: first i heard of that

    I'm presuming cooked ones that would be gloopy and can set like cement but will wait to see his reply.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,210 ✭✭✭ dexter647


    Porridge oats?....I've been killing birds round these parts for years so..:eek:


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,436 One_Of_Shanks


    yeah raw ones are fine. This popped up when ya google it:

    Uncooked rice may be eaten by birds such as pigeons, doves and pheasants but is less likely to attract other species. Porridge oats must never be cooked, since this makes them glutinous and could harden around a bird's beak. Uncooked porridge oats are readily taken by a number of bird species.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 146 ✭✭ Lepidoptera


    Birds are really struggling to find fresh water lately and need that just as much. I've been having to refill my bird bath a couple times a day as it's just swarmed with desperately thirsty birds who can't find water anywhere else.

    It's really easy to make fat balls for birds, which is what they need right now. If you cook any meat, save your beef drippings and put that in a mold with any seeds/nuts/berries etc for them. They'll even love grated cheese right now because they need lots of fat to keep warm.


  • Registered Users Posts: 630 ✭✭✭ Markgc


    Yes of course water is essential too. Without water nothing survives.

    With regards to porridge oats, if you throw out dry oats birds may eat them but the chances of the oats remaining dry is usually slim in our variable weather.
    Cheap alternatives are readily available.


  • Registered Users Posts: 630 ✭✭✭ Markgc


    Markgc wrote: »
    Yes of course water is essential too. Without water nothing survives.

    With regards to porridge oats, if you throw out dry oats birds may eat them but the chances of the oats remaining dry is usually slim in our variable weather.
    Cheap alternatives are readily available.

    Also bread must be soaked in water before feeding as dry bread will swell in birds stomachs. But there is little nutrition in bread for them, especially white.

    Thanks lads.
    Please promote wildlife- well-being to family , neighbours and most importantly kids. We have got to nurture the next generation in the right way. If we cannot protect what we have on our door step then everyone loses.


  • Registered Users Posts: 630 ✭✭✭ Markgc


    UNSAFE SEEDS: The seeds of apples and the pits of cherries, peaches, plums, pears, apricots and nectarines are all unsafe to give to your birds. They contain varying levels of a cyanide compound that can cause death. ... Unfortunately, birds chew everything, and if given the opportunity to chew open a pit, they will.
    So with a little time, it is best to core and remove seeds.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 72,216 Mod ✭✭✭✭ New Home


    Markgc wrote: »
    Yes of course water is essential too. Without water nothing survives.

    With regards to porridge oats, if you throw out dry oats birds may eat them but the chances of the oats remaining dry is usually slim in our variable weather.
    Cheap alternatives are readily available.

    I put some water in a polystyrene tray, yesterday - out of all the other trays and buckets I have ariund, this was the one that took the longest to freeze through, I suppose it's because the polystyrene acted as insulation. I was worried the birds might peck chunks out of it, but thankfully didn't happen.


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,201 Doltanian


    Markgc wrote: »
    Okay so many people are having a good time with the snow and a couple days off work. Good on you. Enjoy it.
    The wildlife though has a difficult time in these conditions with snow measuring half a meter in depth in places, creating great difficulty for it to find food.
    Give a hand and help it survive.

    This is a tough time for birds. Keen gardeners will know that their natural food source has been depleted, leaving our feathered friends struggling to find food under the heavy cover of snow. They need all the help they can get.

    They will eat seeds bread and apples.
    DO NOT FEED THEM PORRIDGE OATS. When wet this can glue their beaks shut, starving them to death.

    Foxes like cooked or raw meat and tinned pet food. Foxes also like other savoury items such as cheese, table scraps, bread soaked in fat, fruit and cooked vegetables.

    Also call-in to elderly neighbours.

    Thanks for taking the time.
    Stay safe.

    Why would you feed foxes? They are vermin and should be eradicated at every opportunity.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,837 ✭✭✭ Pa ElGrande


    I've been feeding the local wildlife here.

    https://streamable.com/a7jf9


  • Registered Users Posts: 630 ✭✭✭ Markgc


    I've been feeding the local wildlife here.

    https://streamable.com/a7jf9

    You need to set some poison down for that sort pal.🀣


  • Registered Users Posts: 630 ✭✭✭ Markgc


    Markgc wrote: »
    You need to set some poison down for that sort pal.🀣

    That one's got mange.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 32,688 ✭✭✭✭ Harrison Tender Prizefight


    Markgc wrote: »
    UNSAFE SEEDS: The seeds of apples and the pits of cherries, peaches, plums, pears, apricots and nectarines are all unsafe to give to your birds. They contain varying levels of a cyanide compound that can cause death. ... Unfortunately, birds chew everything, and if given the opportunity to chew open a pit, they will.
    So with a little time, it is best to core and remove seeds.

    This advice is for pet birds and refers to regular feeding of apple seeds. Apple seeds contain minute traces of cyanide. Wild birds gorge annually on apple harvests. A few apples chopped will do no harm.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,026 ✭✭✭ Amalgam


    Doltanian wrote: »
    Why would you feed foxes? They are vermin and should be eradicated at every opportunity.

    They're a part of nature's landcsape, removal of carrion etc.. yes, I am aware of severe issues with farmers, that's all I've got to say. I don't want to be drawn in to an argument, where we might, despite your statement, have matching opinions about a lot of other things.


  • Registered Users Posts: 630 ✭✭✭ Markgc


    Doltanian wrote: »
    Why would you feed foxes? They are vermin and should be eradicated at every opportunity.

    Why are you describing them as vermin?
    Because they attack lambs as a source of food? That's nature. It's up to farmers to protect their 'assets'.
    What about Elephants native to Tanzania for example. Farmers grow crops in the animal's natural roaming pathways and elephants tend to eat them, destroying potential yields.
    Should they be eradicated at every opportunity?

    Or take tigers in Asia. They often live in close proximity to humans and tigers have killed more people than any other big cat. Should they be eradicated at every opportunity?

    Today in the news a newborn lamb "frozen to the ground" and left for dead is recovering after being saved by a pet dog. Its mother had struggled to give birth to twins during Storm Emma, which had left the animal in freezing conditions. As she gave birth to the second lamb in those conditions, the mother must have left it and it became frozen to the ground!
    The farmer left the sheep outside to struggle on. Is this cruelty?
    Shouldn't these type of farmers be eradicated at every opportunity?


  • Registered Users Posts: 630 ✭✭✭ Markgc


    When feeding birds during the spring and summer it is best not to put out food that is likely to create problems during the breeding season.

    Therefore, never put out

    soggy oats,
    loose peanuts,
    dry hard foods,
    large chunks of bread,
    or fats

    during the spring or summer months.
    Ensure all peanuts are fed from a mesh peanut feeder, as whole peanuts can be harmful to young birds.

    All these can get trapped in young throats.


  • Registered Users Posts: 630 ✭✭✭ Markgc


    If you continue to feed them daily or on alternate days, you will support the population and promote population growth.
    Insects are diminishing at an alarming rate due to pesticides and such.
    You may even encourage new species into your area. Once they know there is a constant food source they will return again and again. It doesn't cost a lot.
    Cheers.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 72,216 Mod ✭✭✭✭ New Home


    Also, they've probably begun to rely on your food over the last couple of days, and may suffer if you stop feeding them suddenly.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,145 lolo62


    I've been feeding them smashed up fat/seed wild bird food balls from Tesco. They're going down a treat... Are these OK?


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 7,611 ✭✭✭ david75


    I hung up some apples in our tree in the garden and put out some sesame seeds and bits of cheese on two plates. No sign of them going near them so far. We’ve two robins living in the huge bush that covers our back wall and loads of small sparrows and finches I think nearby and a thrush.
    Are they just not seeing it maybe?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,145 lolo62


    david75 wrote: »
    I hung up some apples in our tree in the garden and put out some sesame seeds and bits of cheese on two plates. No sign of them going near them so far. We’ve two robins living in the huge bush that covers our back wall and loads of small sparrows and finches I think nearby and a thrush.
    Are they just not seeing it maybe?

    I hung two fat balls in a bit of onion mesh bag from the tree out the back and they didn't go near them... They went for the plate when I broke them up. Are the plates up nice and high?


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 7,611 ✭✭✭ david75


    lolo62 wrote: »
    I hung two fat balls in a bit of onion mesh bag from the tree out the back and they didn't go near them... They went for the plate when I broke them up. Are the plates up nice and high?

    No they’re on the raised deck at the back wall and another down by the back door.
    Our two robins are usually totally fearless and often land on my palm or take food out of my fingers.
    Unusual they’re so reluctant


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,177 ✭✭✭✭ Akrasia


    david75 wrote: »
    I hung up some apples in our tree in the garden and put out some sesame seeds and bits of cheese on two plates. No sign of them going near them so far. We’ve two robins living in the huge bush that covers our back wall and loads of small sparrows and finches I think nearby and a thrush.
    Are they just not seeing it maybe?
    Robins, wagtails and thrushes prefer to feed from the ground. If you cut the apples in half and leave them on the snow or some cleared ground they'll eat them


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,145 lolo62


    david75 wrote: »
    No they’re on the raised deck at the back wall and another down by the back door.
    Our two robins are usually totally fearless and often land on my palm or take food out of my fingers.
    Unusual they’re so reluctant

    Wow lucky you with robins eating from your hands! I have a cat so doing my bit for the birdies during the snow but try not to attract them the rest of the time or I'd be finding them decapitated on my doorstep as gifts 😩


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,629 ✭✭✭ Rubberchikken


    We put out peanuts in a proper feeder all year round.
    Find that they eat less of them in summer so theyre probably enjoying all the berries etc at that time of year.
    We do put out bread but we break it up so hope thats ok.
    Actually saw our fox this morning. Knew thete was one around. Our dog loves rolling in fox poo:eek: but we hadnt seen him/her before. Beautiful animal:)


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,629 ✭✭✭ Elmer Blooker


    Those balls of fat yokes should be banned. They must be absolutely laced with chemicals. They could last for months/years and still not go mouldy.
    I wouldn't leave them out for the birds if it was -20c!

    I put out left over rice the other day and they wouldn't touch it. It was good enough for me!


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,145 lolo62


    Those balls of fat yokes should be banned. They must be absolutely laced with chemicals. They could last for months/years and still not go mouldy.
    I wouldn't leave them out for the birds if it was -20c!

    Oh really?! S**t! I thought I was being conscientious...whats good to give them then just bread?


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 7,611 ✭✭✭ david75


    I thought fat as with butter never goes off? There’s nothing in it for mould and bacteria to grow on /feed on?
    Don’t know where I heard that


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