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Corrugated Galvanized Roof on House?

  • 05-01-2018 12:37pm
    #1
    Site Banned Posts: 518 eamon11


    hello folks,

    doing up a very old cottage out the country and needs to be on a budget. Many old farm buildings have this roof type and I was thinking of putting this on. I would paint it red in due course. I have seen the odd old farmhouse with this also. Would it look OK or really out of place today.
    Thanks for your opinions.


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 375 ✭✭ anthony500_1


    One thing to be mindful of, is tin roofs are very loud when it's raining out, if you plan on living in it, this might be an issue. Have You ever stood in a cladded roof shed when it's pelting rain??? It gets loud Personally I'd go with a fibre cement slate which can be bought for around 15 euro a square meter, by the time you buy the cladding and install it, the slate would not cost much more,

    Just my 2 cents wort


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,047 ✭✭✭✭ _Brian


    eamon11 wrote: »
    hello folks,

    doing up a very old cottage out the country and needs to be on a budget. Many old farm buildings have this roof type and I was thinking of putting this on. I would paint it red in due course. I have seen the odd old farmhouse with this also. Would it look OK or really out of place today.
    Thanks for your opinions.

    I personally think it would look fine if the style of the cottage suited it.
    Noise is a problem as mentioned above but decent insulation would negate much of that.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,702 ✭✭✭ funkey_monkey


    I think this was done on Dermot Bannon's TV show last year on RTE. It was a farmhouse (I think it was in Tipp) and a single storey extension to the side was added which was roofed with tin like sheets.

    I suspect you'd want to do it cheaper though. You'll need a hell of a load of insulation to keep the heat in and also reduce the noise.

    You would be much better off getting the prepainted zinc coated sheets instead of the bare sheets - much better quality for a little more expense. You'll save in the long run with rust and paint costs. Peeling paint on a tin roof (which will happen) looks awful - bad enough on a byre, but worse still on a house.

    This is the one that Dermot done. You might find more details on it elsewhere:
    pjimage-574.jpg?strip=all&w=960


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 4,978 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Genghis Cant


    Would tile effect cladding be an option?

    The sheets cover a meter and the Pvc coated ones look fresh for a long time.


  • Site Banned Posts: 518 eamon11


    thanks lads,

    appreciate the input.

    The preprinted zinc coated sheets are a good idea and I will look into this.
    Regarding noise, as the complete roof will be stripped anyway, I will be packing it with insulation. Cost wise against the slate, there is an added advantage in the tin roof as I can do it myself, the rafters can have a wider spacing thereby less rafters, no 2 x 1 laths but rather 3 x 2 at long intervals. I also want to put an extension out back which will simply consist of making the complete house wider, so the front looks the same. Have seen this extension style all over on older houses. But would the preprinted red tin still look ok. That's the question.
    Cheers


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,702 ✭✭✭ funkey_monkey


    the rafters can have a wider spacing thereby less rafters

    Just one thing - I'm almost sure you are talking about straight sheets here, but if for some reason you are thinking about the curved sheets I'd recommend avoiding them. The are a bollix to work on (and dangerous too) as you can't use roof ladders and can be more prone to lifting in heavy wind. I believe that their trusses have increased load bearing requirements for snow that you might have to consider (open for correction on this though).

    Have you checked the regs in relation to load bearing requirements for these types of roofs? If not, I recommend that you get it checked out by a structural engineer as they have load bearing calculations for the roof to pass in order to it to be compliant.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,702 ✭✭✭ funkey_monkey


    But would the preprinted red tin still look ok. That's the question

    I would think that a red oxide (dull red) type finish would look better than a std bright red. I think that is what is done on the house I displayed in above post.
    If you are anywhere nearby, it would be a nice Sunday drive to go see it or similar if you can find another place.

    You can nip into your local argi suppliers and ask about the prepainted zinc sheets. They will direct you to either their stock for a look or to their suppliers website or brochure.

    What I can say is that we have some sheds that had a dull blue finish - it looks very close to blueish slate at a distance. If you were going to bottle using red, it would be a 'safe' alternative.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,702 ✭✭✭ funkey_monkey


    Before I drop out here, a couple of things.

    If you do decide to go ahead with corrugated tin, pre-drill the holes with a fine drill bit - it will stop you denting the ridge as you try to drive the nail through. Dents can spoil the look and people will definitely be looking at this roof!

    For the same reason as above, don't overdo the hammering of the nails into position.

    Use these type of roofing nails as the rubber helps to provide a watertight seal:
    c0f3a41dbf6b45c35a4e3320451102df.jpg

    And please God use a straight edge for your nail lines. If it is up and down, it'll ruin the look of it. Although, I'm a bit fussy with things like this!!!

    Sorry if this is teaching your granny how to suck eggs, but thought I'd put it out here anyway! :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,919 ✭✭✭ Say my name


    Would tile effect cladding be an option?

    The sheets cover a meter and the Pvc coated ones look fresh for a long time.

    I've got the tile effect cladding on an outhouse.
    Terracotta is the colour of my ones.

    I think you can also get the insulated sandwich sheets in tile effect too?

    The ones I got came from Gusclad.
    It saves me ever getting up on the roof ever again to replace slates anyway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,919 ✭✭✭ Say my name


    I've got the tile effect cladding on an outhouse.
    Terracotta is the colour of my ones.

    I think you can also get the insulated sandwich sheets in tile effect too?

    The ones I got came from Gusclad.
    It saves me ever getting up on the roof ever again to replace slates anyway.

    Yep. You can get them.

    https://oconnorroofing.ie/product/insulated-tile-effect-panels/

    It would make you wonder why anyone would bother with tile and slates now.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 28 ✭✭✭ i know u know


    I have corrugated sheeting/ cladding put on my house its an old cottage. Works out far cheaper as a roof when I compaired the price with slates and tile etc. It came in the lengths needed and very quick to put up. As regards noise I have it very well insulated and have no noise issues you can also buy the sheeting already insulated so it saves on labour time so not having to insulate after the sheeting is up. I have it in a navy colour on a stone cottage. Would upload pics but I dont know how to!!


  • Site Banned Posts: 518 eamon11


    Lads, ye are a font of info,

    many thanks Funkey monkey for all the tips. All good to know.
    Say my name, do you know what the tile effect cladding cost?
    I know you know, if you cannot manage the pics maybe someday I could take a drive by to see the finished cottage. Would love to have a look at it.

    All the names sound like horses names!

    Have to say also that any time I have looked for help or advice ye lads are far more direct and easier to deal with that other sections on boards.

    Thanks a lot


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,300 kerry cow


    Farmers are just all rounders .


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,078 ✭✭✭ jimini0


    Before I drop out here, a couple of things.

    If you do decide to go ahead with corrugated tin, pre-drill the holes with a fine drill bit - it will stop you denting the ridge as you try to drive the nail through. Dents can spoil the look and people will definitely be looking at this roof!

    For the same reason as above, don't overdo the hammering of the nails into position.

    Use these type of roofing nails as the rubber helps to provide a watertight seal:
    c0f3a41dbf6b45c35a4e3320451102df.jpg

    And please God use a straight edge for your nail lines. If it is up and down, it'll ruin the look of it. Although, I'm a bit fussy with things like this!!!

    Sorry if this is teaching your granny how to suck eggs, but thought I'd put it out here anyway! :pac:

    Those threaded nails are good but I prefer to use the actual screw version. Nothing worse than looking up at a popped nail. It's got a hex head and you can get a cap to cover the head. The metal roof does expand and contract a good bit so bare that in mind when choosing the the sheeting and hardware.


  • Site Banned Posts: 518 eamon11


    cheers lads,

    Jim, are these screws with a rubber washer also?
    A's regards contraction and expanding what is the method of dealing with this?


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,919 ✭✭✭ Say my name


    Yea the sheets are up a few years now.
    But roughly they were double the price of the heaviest corrugated sheet on the market.
    I was taking slates off the house and I didn't want to put up corrugated sheets the same as the big sheds in the yard. As it's a stone house with a loft I thought the house should stand out anyway so that's why I went with the terracotta tile effect.
    Gusclad supplied the timber tex screws and coloured caps as well.
    There's rubber washers on those screws.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,769 ✭✭✭ my3cents


    One point I'd make is that for a roof for a dwelling I would do more than the recommended single corrugation overlap.

    You'll even find info on doing a half corrugation overlap but that is only for farm buildings.

    Our old cottage has a corrugated roof over chopped back thatch (insulation and no noise) and when I replaced the corrugated iron on the most exposed side (salt damage) I did it with an extra overlap (1 + 1/2).

    I'd recommend tech screws for the fixings and no need to drill the holes first as they are self drilling but you do need to center punch where the holes are going or you won't be able to start the tech screws off. I highly recommend buying a battery impact drill for the fixings.

    Another point is research the grades of galvanised iron you can get. The thin ones are total rubbish and you'll damage them before you even get them on the roof. Hunt around for the thickest grade. Don't overtighten the fixings as you can change the profile of the corrugations which can take you well off line.

    Painting either leave for a couple of years to weather before painting or do the first coat with a 50/50 mix of oxide paint and owtrol, you can chemically etch the roof to get the paint to stick but its not a system I like. If you hadn't realised paint won't normally stick to new galvanised.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,078 ✭✭✭ jimini0


    eamon11 wrote: »
    cheers lads,

    Jim, are these screws with a rubber washer also?
    A's regards contraction and expanding what is the method of dealing with this?

    Ya they come with the rubber washer as well. You can do nothing about the expanding and contracting that's just a natural process metal and other materials go trough when warm and cold. The rubber washer should help with that.
    I held a mate of mine put a on those tile effect sheets a while ago. It was only a garden shed. He is a bit ott and squeezed a small bit of silicone around the screw hole before he screwed them down.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,702 ✭✭✭ funkey_monkey


    jimini0 wrote: »
    Those threaded nails are good but I prefer to use the actual screw version. Nothing worse than looking up at a popped nail. It's got a hex head and you can get a cap to cover the head. The metal roof does expand and contract a good bit so bare that in mind when choosing the the sheeting and hardware.

    Yip - those are better - I was more coming from the point of the rubber washer as he was hinting at doing it as cheap as he could!


  • Site Banned Posts: 518 eamon11


    was thinking of putting in 1 or 2 roof windows too but not sure it would tie in with the old style look. They wouldn't have to be big VELUX or be able to open. Something small and non opening just to throw in some light in attic.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,769 ✭✭✭ my3cents


    eamon11 wrote: »
    was thinking of putting in 1 or 2 roof windows too but not sure it would tie in with the old style look. They wouldn't have to be big VELUX or be able to open. Something small and non opening just to throw in some light in attic.

    tbh I don't think I'd do that? Not easy to marry up the wavy profile of the cgi with the window. Where does the water drain from the center top of the window where the cgi valleys meet it? Don't even thing of using the transparent corrugated sheeting for light it fades and goes brittle over time.

    Going back to fixings these are as near to the ones I use I could find a picture of online https://www.fixfactory.co.uk/products/composite-panel-fasteners-5-5-6-3-x-80mm-htls80 .
    composite_3_grande.jpg?v=1374068840
    The 80mm ones are the minimum length I'd use the 105 to 150mm might be better depending on your roof timber (with the soft wide grained timber often available now I'd go with the longer screws). So you don't wander off line when starting the screws off then just center punch where you want to start them off.

    Edit> Don't forget you'll be going through 2 or even 4 sheets of cgi (corrugated galvanised iron) at some places and thats were the self drilling screws come into their own.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,821 ✭✭✭ Bullocks


    my3cents wrote: »
    tbh I don't think I'd do that? Not easy to marry up the wavy profile of the cgi with the window. Where does the water drain from the center top of the window where the cgi valleys meet it? Don't even thing of using the transparent corrugated sheeting for light it fades and goes brittle over time.

    Going back to fixings these are as near to the ones I use I could find a picture of online https://www.fixfactory.co.uk/products/composite-panel-fasteners-5-5-6-3-x-80mm-htls80 .
    composite_3_grande.jpg?v=1374068840
    The 80mm ones are the minimum length I'd use the 105 to 150mm might be better depending on your roof timber (with the soft wide grained timber often available now I'd go with the longer screws). So you don't wander off line when starting the screws off then just center punch where you want to start them off.

    Edit> Don't forget you'll be going through 2 or even 4 sheets of cgi (corrugated galvanised iron) at some places and thats were the self drilling screws come into their own.
    I'm not certain but I think Velux have flashings to suit the morris profile .

    Other option would be to raise up an ope out of the sheeting that would take a velux and finish/weather it with trocal or something similar . That might work out a bit expensive though


  • Site Banned Posts: 518 eamon11


    Thanks lads,

    seen a window which comes with the flashing attached. Watched the video. The flashing is a flexible soft metal which you can mould to the curves of the corrugated metal.
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Sunlux-47cm-x-73cm-Top-Hung-Skylight-Access-Roof-window-Rooflight-with-flashing/272118098787?epid=1063196238&hash=item3f5b80ab63:g:bz8AAOSwNphWZaUT


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,047 ✭✭✭✭ _Brian


    eamon11 wrote: »
    was thinking of putting in 1 or 2 roof windows too but not sure it would tie in with the old style look. They wouldn't have to be big VELUX or be able to open. Something small and non opening just to throw in some light in attic.

    It’s just more cuts into sheets to have points of rust and more places for water to make its way in.

    Also, if you contact the suppliers of the tile effect sheeting they will tell you where the closest job to you is so you can see it. I think there is one between Cootehill & Cavan town that I can think of. There might be google street view shots, I’ll see if I can find the location.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,769 ✭✭✭ my3cents


    eamon11 wrote: »
    Thanks lads,

    seen a window which comes with the flashing attached. Watched the video. The flashing is a flexible soft metal which you can mould to the curves of the corrugated metal.
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Sunlux-47cm-x-73cm-Top-Hung-Skylight-Access-Roof-window-Rooflight-with-flashing/272118098787?epid=1063196238&hash=item3f5b80ab63:g:bz8AAOSwNphWZaUT

    I'm sure you could make it fit but that is a very cheap unit that you might regret? I think its basically a bit of greenhouse window aluminium on a wooden frame the strongest part of it will be the glass. Allow in the cost for a good few feet of lead flashing to marry it in I don't think the moldable one included will mold to CGI.

    If you put it near the bottom of the roof it will have to shed all the water that catches in the corrugations above it so you want to be sure that it can do that without the water being forced over the glass. Should be fine but you will only know for sure by trying it out. Further up the roof can't collect so much water so it should be OK there.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,936 ✭✭✭ Who2


    Your getting into big costs with the tile effect sheeting, on a per sq meter basis, especially if you've valleys, hips or porches. When alls accounted for there won't be much of a saving over slating. Get the big things right on your house that won't need changing down the line and save on the furnishings decorating and such. You'll regret it long term especially if your roof isn't right. As for that roof light you were looking at; don't even dream of using it, they are pure scrap. I've worked on a lot of houses over the years and some of the things done ten or fifteen years earlier that were done on the cheap ended up a disaster and the people always regretted it. With your roof put the timbers in at 400mm centers, you'll still need to put in collars or ceiling joists at that to carry whatever finish you use inside so in my eyes the savings there on an average cottage might be 1-200 euro at most. Like I said get all the important things right, your roof is one of the most important parts of a house.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,215 ✭✭✭ jack of all


    jimini0 wrote: »
    He is a bit ott and squeezed a small bit of silicone around the screw hole before he screwed them down.

    Better off to use RITO or a similar gutter/ flashing sealant, the standard silicone can attack the galv/ bright zinc coating on fasteners on account of the acetic acid in the silicone.


  • Site Banned Posts: 518 eamon11


    thought you could buy pre-painted traditional corrugated iron to put on roof but apparently you cannot. There is however something similar but its a thin plastic coating? Or all plastic? I don't know yet as I haven't seen it live. Photo 8 here.

    https://www.donedeal.ie/adview/view/6624684


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,385 ✭✭✭✭ wrangler


    eamon11 wrote: »
    thought you could buy pre-painted traditional corrugated iron to put on roof but apparently you cannot. There is however something similar but its a thin plastic coating? Or all plastic? I don't know yet as I haven't seen it live. Photo 8 here.

    https://www.donedeal.ie/adview/view/6624684

    Farmers are using it for years now on farm building, Shiny galvanise is frowned on in the conutryside now, Plastic coated is working well, have it here 25 years


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,769 ✭✭✭ my3cents


    wrangler wrote: »
    Farmers are using it for years now on farm building, Shiny galvanise is frowned on in the conutryside now, Plastic coated is working well, have it here 25 years

    You don't need to frown on it for long as within 12 months often much less the shine is gone.

    The plastic coated stuff is good but requires a small amount more skill to use as in many cases you screw into the valleys to prevent distorting the sheets so every fixing has to be waterproof. A poor fixing on a traditional CGI on the ridges isn't going to let much water in.


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