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What steps brought Ireland out of recession

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  • 13-11-2017 9:08pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,517 ✭✭✭


    I was thinking there for a second, what did we actually do to get out of the recession in Ireland, because the corporation tax rates were still the same, we were not doing much for education either, and were still not, so how did we improve our situation, because it was from 2013, that our GNP was back positive after 5 years being negative.
    What policies or announcements were made in 2012, that drove our economy back up, I could not find any articles online about it either, so I figured I'd ask the good aul politics forum of boards.ie ;)


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  • Moderators, Entertainment Moderators, Politics Moderators Posts: 14,503 Mod ✭✭✭✭johnnyskeleton


    Mod note:

    Plesse provide your own views on the topic if you want to start a discussion. Also, thread title changed for clarity.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 16,768 ✭✭✭✭tomwaterford


    Imagine the ECB basically keeping the whole thing (euro) afloat on a vast ocean of magic money helped??


  • Registered Users Posts: 27,810 ✭✭✭✭blanch152


    I was thinking there for a second, what did we actually do to get out of the recession in Ireland, because the corporation tax rates were still the same, we were not doing much for education either, and were still not, so how did we improve our situation, because it was from 2013, that our GNP was back positive after 5 years being negative.
    What policies or announcements were made in 2012, that drove our economy back up, I could not find any articles online about it either, so I figured I'd ask the good aul politics forum of boards.ie ;)


    https://www.enterprise-ireland.com/en/News/PressReleases/2012-Press-Releases/Government-publishes-Action-Plan-for-Jobs-2012.html

    Action Plan for Jobs 2012, much derided by the "experts" on boards but has delivered significant increases in employment and reductions in unemployment.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,593 ✭✭✭Wheeliebin30


    Simple thing called austerity.

    Living within our means.

    Taking the hard decisions and choices that had to be made in the face of strong criticism and political suicide.


  • Moderators, Politics Moderators Posts: 39,671 Mod ✭✭✭✭Seth Brundle


    Simple thing called austerity.

    Living within our means.
    We had very mild austerity when compared to other countries such as Greece.
    As for living within our means, it's a very long time since this country lived within our means!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,229 ✭✭✭LeinsterDub


    I'm no expert so I may be wrong but my opinion was always that Ireland was suffering from a cash flow problem rather than a structural issue like Greece


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,852 ✭✭✭✭Idbatterim


    I wouldn't give much credit. They simply do anything particularly stupid to hinder the recovery ...


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,852 ✭✭✭✭Idbatterim


    Simple thing called austerity.

    Living within our means.

    Taking the hard decisions and choices that had to be made in the face of strong criticism and political suicide.
    I don't think they made any hard decisions. Of course they say they did. They slashed the capital budget and borrowed tens of billions to avoid what I would call any real "hard decisions " ...


  • Registered Users Posts: 51,846 ✭✭✭✭tayto lover


    Easy. They made the poor and middle classes pay for the rich people's losses.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 132 ✭✭Obvious Otter


    Simple thing called austerity.

    Living within our means.

    Taking the hard decisions and choices that had to be made in the face of strong criticism and political suicide.

    Austerity was the easy option. It’s much easier to make the Irish taxpayer pay for unsecured bonds than actually do your job as an elected public official. We build our economic policy to satisfy the markets and corporate interests. There were very few hard decisions taken and even fewer hard decisions were made to tighten up accounting regulations and audits of these banks. There is no more accountability. It’s embarrassing.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 20,397 ✭✭✭✭FreudianSlippers


    Simple thing called austerity.

    Living within our means.

    Taking the hard decisions and choices that had to be made in the face of strong criticism and political suicide.
    Keeping our pillar banks alive and transferring all the toxic assets to NAMA was also a key decision which helped us recover.
    I've always been of the opinion that the guarantee was too broad and some of the smaller banks should have been let fail - but given how well this has worked out, we'll never know if that decision would have been good or not.


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,921 ✭✭✭✭listermint


    kbannon wrote: »
    We had very mild austerity when compared to other countries such as Greece.
    As for living within our means, it's a very long time since this country lived within our means!

    tbf greece is a different kettle of fish for multiple different reasons not withstanding FDI and just general tax collection.

    We definitely had Austerity, its was not as visible as greece because of the scale of avoidance in tax take.

    Here it manifested itself visually in reduction of local services like cutting grass verges , i remember seeing them allowed to grow to 3 foot in height on some south Dublin central road dividers for months on end. The removal of local community schemes and assistances , social workers etc.

    We most definitely suffered cuts across the board it just didnt manifest itself with bread lines nationwide solely due to our revenue service being as tight as a drum and our FDI.

    Off loading the bad debt to Nama was a superb idea given the circumstance.


  • Moderators, Politics Moderators Posts: 39,671 Mod ✭✭✭✭Seth Brundle


    listermint wrote: »
    tbf greece is a different kettle of fish for multiple different reasons not withstanding FDI and just general tax collection.

    We definitely had Austerity, its was not as visible as greece because of the scale of avoidance in tax take.

    Here it manifested itself visually in reduction of local services like cutting grass verges , i remember seeing them allowed to grow to 3 foot in height on some south Dublin central road dividers for months on end. The removal of local community schemes and assistances , social workers etc.

    We most definitely suffered cuts across the board it just didnt manifest itself with bread lines nationwide solely due to our revenue service being as tight as a drum and our FDI.

    Off loading the bad debt to Nama was a superb idea given the circumstance.
    I never said that we didn't have austerity. I said we had mild austerity, which we did.
    What we (FG & Lab) should have done back in 2011 was slash spending on the big stuff (not grass cutting) such as welfare. But they didnt.
    They should have introduced water charges there and then. But they didnt.
    We had the opportunity to curtail some of the wastefulness of the health system but aside from some cosmetic touch ups, did nothing.
    They had the opportunities to correct our massive over spending issue but like all other politicians, could not bring themselves to do it and instead continued spending money we didn't have.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,611 ✭✭✭Mooooo


    Time


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 16,015 ✭✭✭✭James Brown


    Austerity for the majority, a historically large loan and a rush to get the people, many of whom who caused the problem in the first place, back in business. This helped the economy grow, and pleased the world's finance organisations, but did not aid the greater society above creating often poor paying jobs.
    We have a situation where working does not guarantee full time and does not guarantee being able to afford rent without state aid. And reports that the gap between house prices and affordability are set to widen further, and many of the housing market customer base are reliant on grants and subsidies funded by the tax payer.
    Coupled with record breaking homeless, record breaking numbers in emergency accommodation and arguably being on the way to another property bubble; it's not so clean cut to suggest we are out of anything.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,852 ✭✭✭✭Idbatterim


    kbannon wrote: »
    I never said that we didn't have austerity. I said we had mild austerity, which we did.
    What we (FG & Lab) should have done back in 2011 was slash spending on the big stuff (not grass cutting) such as welfare. But they didnt.
    They should have introduced water charges there and then. But they didnt.
    We had the opportunity to curtail some of the wastefulness of the health system but aside from some cosmetic touch ups, did nothing.
    They had the opportunities to correct our massive over spending issue but like all other politicians, could not bring themselves to do it and instead continued spending money we didn't have.

    100%. I look back now, look at the joke rate of LPT. no water charges (at least they tried to implement these) Labour getting in with FG in 2011 was a disaster for the country in my opinion, it stopped needed reform of black holes like welfare and PS...

    we would be in a much better position now if they had not had to share power, in my opinion...


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,921 ✭✭✭✭listermint


    Idbatterim wrote: »
    100%. I look back now, look at the joke rate of LPT. no water charges (at least they tried to implement these) Labour getting in with FG in 2011 was a disaster for the country in my opinion, it stopped needed reform of black holes like welfare and PS...

    we would be in a much better position now if they had not had to share power, in my opinion...

    I disagree, What mark of note within FG is there to address anything within PS or Welfare .

    Nothing, and dont blame labour on it (i have no love for labour) but FG took no real steps at all to address any of it, none that labour stopped.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 16,015 ✭✭✭✭James Brown


    The idea that anyone thinks it's over is very concerning. It would seem while many are still suffering the repercussions, not only have Fine Gael done little to change the way we do business, the next crash may come along before we can begin to say the last and it's effects are over.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,852 ✭✭✭✭Idbatterim


    I disagree, What mark of note within FG is there to address anything within PS or Welfare .

    Nothing, and dont blame labour on it (i have no love for labour) but FG took no real steps at all to address any of it, none that labour stopped.

    Oh I agree now, the fight certainly seems to be gone out of them now. But there was an unprecedented opportunity in 2011 after the crash after years out of power, when there was appertite for change and the pulbic accepted the state was broke. It was a once off opportunity, to right some of the wrongs of the aherne years...

    Labour with their "every little hurts " campain. Goebbels stuff right there LOL Them getting into government hurt this country!


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,921 ✭✭✭✭listermint


    Idbatterim wrote: »
    Oh I agree now, the fight certainly seems to be gone out of them now. But there was an unprecedented opportunity in 2011 after the crash after years out of power, when there was appertite for change and the pulbic accepted the state was broke. It was a once off opportunity, to right some of the wrongs of the aherne years...

    Labour with their "every little hurts " campain. Goebbels stuff right there LOL Them getting into government hurt this country!

    No, my point is there was never an appetite, not that it was there and left.

    It didnt exist.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 17,852 ✭✭✭✭Idbatterim


    listermint wrote: »
    No, my point is there was never an appetite, not that it was there and left.

    It didnt exist.

    I dont think they had an appetite to do what I would have liked to have seen done with them. But I do think they would have targeted them more if it werent for labour...


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 16,015 ✭✭✭✭James Brown


    I think the agenda under which they got in was never going to be followed up on. Cronyism and 'looking after our own' were rife from day one. Labour were saying nothing on somethings and backing others but I don't think any faux socialist agenda on their part played any real role.


  • Registered Users Posts: 295 ✭✭eoinfitzokk


    The appetite for change was not enough, Ireland was in a similar situation to New Zealand in the 1980s (according to this excellent documentary; Revolution Link: https://youtu.be/JZXpeUQ0tD8), but we saw no sweeping reforms. The New Zealand labour government of that time ushered in truely needed reform.

    The Irish Water protests were enough to send the Government cowering in the corner - both Labour and Fine Gael. True governance requires tough and unpopular decisions and communication of the need for reform.

    True change would have made some progress into the Water Infrastructure Crisis, HSE expenditure or socially adjusted welfare payments.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 16,015 ✭✭✭✭James Brown


    The appetite for change was not enough, Ireland was in a similar situation to New Zealand in the 1980s (according to this excellent documentary; Revolution Link: https://youtu.be/JZXpeUQ0tD8), but we saw no sweeping reforms. The New Zealand labour government of that time ushered in truely needed reform.

    The Irish Water protests were enough to send the Government cowering in the corner - both Labour and Fine Gael. True governance requires tough and unpopular decisions and communication of the need for reform.

    True change would have made some progress into the Water Infrastructure Crisis, HSE expenditure or socially adjusted welfare payments.

    Your timeline is a little skewed.
    All talk to meaningful change was quietened long before IW. The biggest move they made was IW, but they prioritised it over the promises to end cronyism, change the way we do business etc. How the public reacted to IW had absolutely nothing to do with FG's unwillingness to follow through on election promises. There was more money to be made privately in keeping things as was.
    You can not equate water metering with hospital trolley wait times, 'If they won't accept money towards metering, forget tackling health'. I don't think so. We allowed ourselves take the loan, bailout private gamblers under the list of things we had to do. Overhauling health would have been possible.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,852 ✭✭✭✭Idbatterim


    The appetite for change was not enough, Ireland was in a similar situation to New Zealand in the 1980s (according to this excellent documentary; Revolution Link: https://youtu.be/JZXpeUQ0tD8), but we saw no sweeping reforms. The New Zealand labour government of that time ushered in truely needed reform.

    The Irish Water protests were enough to send the Government cowering in the corner - both Labour and Fine Gael. True governance requires tough and unpopular decisions and communication of the need for reform.

    True change would have made some progress into the Water Infrastructure Crisis, HSE expenditure or socially adjusted welfare payments.

    you are preaching to the choir on this, spot on! of course FG will claim they made the tough calls, of course they will say that! like I said having Labour in there made things a bit more difficult, Ill give them that. There the Irish are harping on about change and reform. They put in Labour to block it! We deserve what we get!


  • Registered Users Posts: 27,810 ✭✭✭✭blanch152


    We allowed ourselves take the loan, bailout private gamblers under the list of things we had to do. Overhauling health would have been possible.

    You have got the chronology of that wrong.

    FF bailed out the banks in 2008 by giving them a guarantee and left the taxpayers with a potential bill. When the economy collapsed, and the banks with them, the guarantee was called in, the one we have signed up to democratically under FF, and FF had to call in the IMF and the subsequent government had no option but to borrow the money to pay for the cost of the guarantee.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,852 ✭✭✭✭Idbatterim


    You have got the chronology of that wrong.

    FF bailed out the banks in 2008 by giving them a guarantee and left the taxpayers with a potential bill. When the economy collapsed, and the banks with them, the guarantee was called in, the one we have signed up to democratically under FF, and FF had to call in the IMF and the subsequent government had no option but to borrow the money to pay for the cost of the guarantee.

    I agree. You know what, the lesson to be learned is, never allow ourselves be put in that position again. This isnt about right or wrong. "We" were the ones who were desperate for the money, the big boys called the shots. We allowed ourselves get in that position, like I said, dont let them get that sort of control over you in future.

    If people think the majority of us saw austerity, Id like to have seen what would happen if we had to balance the books over night. Those people that bitch most in society, are the ones who massively beneffited from being bailed out. The cost of which is massively borne by others anyway, the "high" earners here are crucified to pay for the entire farce...


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 16,015 ✭✭✭✭James Brown


    blanch152 wrote: »
    You have got the chronology of that wrong.

    FF bailed out the banks in 2008 by giving them a guarantee and left the taxpayers with a potential bill. When the economy collapsed, and the banks with them, the guarantee was called in, the one we have signed up to democratically under FF, and FF had to call in the IMF and the subsequent government had no option but to borrow the money to pay for the cost of the guarantee.

    You are misrepresenting my post by selective quote.

    The premise put forward was FG/Lab were too scared to bring in any big changes after the response IW/metering got.

    It was June of 2011 before Hogan even brought forward the intent of installing water meters to the Dáil. I believe Fine Gael under Kenny took power in March of that year. It was 2013 before IW was incorporated as a semi-state.
    Therefore, it was not a case of Irish Water/Metering being put to the people and their kick back being so severe that FG shied away from tackling the way we do business, cronyism and healthcare.

    You are referencing a later part of my post where I am following on and stating that as we allowed the bailouts of the private gamblers and banks as an alleged 'must do', we certainly were open to over hauling the health service.

    Why FG failed to follow up on changing things in any meaningful way and let the time for such action slip by, is open for debate, but I would guess it has more to do with them liking things as is.


  • Registered Users Posts: 29,336 ✭✭✭✭Wanderer78


    'keep the recovery going':rolleyes:


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  • Registered Users Posts: 17,852 ✭✭✭✭Idbatterim


    'keep the recovery going'
    yeah keep it going for FG, the banks and the usual hangers on... The ones I truly feel sorry for are the actually vulnerable (this doesnt include your typical pensioner or welfare lifer) :rolleyes: and those that are done in with outrageous mortgage or rent!


This discussion has been closed.
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