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Tesla Powerwall 2

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 64,664 ✭✭✭✭unkel


    I wouldn't have installed this system if I didn't have more background load at all times than the system produces. System is 3 * 250W panels, inverter can handle up to 600W. Production about 700kWh per year.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,568 ✭✭✭ethernet


    unkel wrote: »
    Nope, inverter plugs into any power socket with the standard UK 3-pin plug

    Is there some isolation in such a setup for when there is a mains outage?

    You know how solar export to the grid should stop to prevent electrocution to electrical workers who might otherwise assume the lines are dead.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,055 ✭✭✭✭KCross


    ethernet wrote: »
    Is there some isolation in such a setup for when there is a mains outage?

    You know how solar export to the grid should stop to prevent electrocution to electrical workers who might otherwise assume the lines are dead.

    Thats what I was getting at. I didn't think you could have, effectively, a generator on your side of the meter without isolation.

    For example, I recently asked a spark about connecting a generator point to the house in the case of an outage to power a few lights etc and he said you can but you need an isolator switch to protect ESB Networks staff. Solar PV is basically the same which is why I thought a spark would be required to connect it and make it match regulations.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,568 ✭✭✭ethernet


    KCross wrote: »
    Thats what I was getting at. I didn't think you could have, effectively, a generator on your side of the meter without isolation.

    For example, I recently asked a spark about connecting a generator point to the house in the case of an outage to power a few lights etc and he said you can but you need an isolator switch to protect ESB Networks staff. Solar PV is basically the same which is why I thought a spark would be required to connect it and make it match regulations.

    Bingo!
    I remember skimming through the process here before so that's what set off alarm bells: https://www.esbnetworks.ie/new-connections/generator-connections/connect-a-micro-generator


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,213 ✭✭✭✭ted1


    unkel wrote: »
    Nope, inverter plugs into any power socket with the standard UK 3-pin plug
    Is it EN50438 certified ?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 23,213 ✭✭✭✭ted1


    I guess not ?

    Is it synchronous or are now powering your devices with two phases? Perhaps you effectively have 25hz powering your devices


  • Registered Users Posts: 223 ✭✭super_sweeney


    so i was doing a bit more digging into the power wall and currently dont really see how its a good idea in ireland. So for my personal circumstance it makes zero sense. I bought a new build and it came with 4 panels that feed into an inverter and then that power is used when the panels are on during the day... So i wanted to store the power turns out the panels are very cheap and only provide max about 100w each so thats not even going to cover running my fridge and making a cup of tea probably. I looked into getting new panels but the cost was large. Also the cost of a tesla battery is apporx 7k so until it becomes cheaper or better grants become available unfortunately not an option :(


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,795 ✭✭✭samih


    so i was doing a bit more digging into the power wall and currently dont really see how its a good idea in ireland. So for my personal circumstance it makes zero sense. I bought a new build and it came with 4 panels that feed into an inverter and then that power is used when the panels are on during the day... So i wanted to store the power turns out the panels are very cheap and only provide max about 100w each so thats not even going to cover running my fridge and making a cup of tea probably. I looked into getting new panels but the cost was large. Also the cost of a tesla battery is apporx 7k so until it becomes cheaper or better grants become available unfortunately not an option :(

    Some supplier no doubt make a good profit with these POS panels and builder didn't care as long as they got a stamp of approval from the building inspector.

    It's sad when it has to be that way. Probably wouldn't even have been any more expensive for the builder to source good quality panels from somewhere else and 1 kW of power from 4 good panes would have already made a big difference.


  • Registered Users Posts: 223 ✭✭super_sweeney


    samih wrote: »
    so i was doing a bit more digging into the power wall and currently dont really see how its a good idea in ireland. So for my personal circumstance it makes zero sense. I bought a new build and it came with 4 panels that feed into an inverter and then that power is used when the panels are on during the day... So i wanted to store the power turns out the panels are very cheap and only provide max about 100w each so thats not even going to cover running my fridge and making a cup of tea probably. I looked into getting new panels but the cost was large. Also the cost of a tesla battery is apporx 7k so until it becomes cheaper or better grants become available unfortunately not an option :(

    Some supplier no doubt make a good profit with these POS panels and builder didn't care as long as they got a stamp of approval from the building inspector.

    It's sad when it has to be that way. Probably wouldn't even have been any more expensive for the builder to source good quality panels from somewhere else and 1 kW of power from 4 good panes would have already made a big difference.
    yup! 100% agree the building standards should be higher for this I feel and should make the builders have to put a battery in as well. It would help stabilise the grid a lot. Such a shame something that could have been done so well and promote the industry so much


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,213 ✭✭✭✭ted1


    samih wrote: »
    so i was doing a bit more digging into the power wall and currently dont really see how its a good idea in ireland. So for my personal circumstance it makes zero sense. I bought a new build and it came with 4 panels that feed into an inverter and then that power is used when the panels are on during the day... So i wanted to store the power turns out the panels are very cheap and only provide max about 100w each so thats not even going to cover running my fridge and making a cup of tea probably. I looked into getting new panels but the cost was large. Also the cost of a tesla battery is apporx 7k so until it becomes cheaper or better grants become available unfortunately not an option :(

    Some supplier no doubt make a good profit with these POS panels and builder didn't care as long as they got a stamp of approval from the building inspector.

    It's sad when it has to be that way. Probably wouldn't even have been any more expensive for the builder to source good quality panels from somewhere else and 1 kW of power from 4 good panes would have already made a big difference.
    yup! 100% agree the building standards should be higher for this I feel and should make the builders have to put a battery in as well. It would help stabilise the grid a lot. Such a shame something that could have been done so well and promote the industry so much
    Don’t agree with the batteries. If they made them compulsory, you should expect to see your standing charge raise.


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