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Projected sea level rises due to Climate Change

  • 04-04-2017 11:35pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 311 ✭✭ Usjes


    Hi,

    Does anyone know what the generally accepted projected sea-level rises are over the next 50years ? I'd just like to get a ballpark idea of what is currently expected, is it like 0.5m or 5m or something else. I'm thinking specifically about Ireland although I would have assumed it would be the same everywhere, so does anyone know or can suggest a resource or even a map showing projected coastline changes ?

    Thanks,

    Usjes.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 14,306 ✭✭✭✭ jimmycrackcorm


    With the new discovery of graphene filtering to take salt out of seawater, I'd expect deserts will be turned into lakes instead.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,907 ✭✭✭✭ Wanderer78


    With the new discovery of graphene filtering to take salt out of seawater, I'd expect deserts will be turned into lakes instead.

    or since 'clean coal' will be in use soon, maybe we ll be all living under the sea in the near future. always wanted to be a mermaid! :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,835 ✭✭✭ Pa ElGrande


    Usjes wrote: »
    Hi,

    Does anyone know what the generally accepted projected sea-level rises are over the next 50years ? I'd just like to get a ballpark idea of what is currently expected, is it like 0.5m or 5m or something else. I'm thinking specifically about Ireland although I would have assumed it would be the same everywhere, so does anyone know or can suggest a resource or even a map showing projected coastline changes ?

    Thanks,

    Usjes.

    You can chose whatever fantasy fits your beliefs. Any such projections you see in the media are simply fantasy aided by graphic artists and Global Climate Models(GCM) (climate models are fantasy, none stack up to actual measured data) , you will find plenty of articles in the news media but no so much that explain who actually measures sea levels around Ireland, how they do it, what the margin of error is, and what factors affect the measurements, don't forget land rises and falls as well and human error is also a factor. See Sea-Level Database for Ireland.

    The baseline mark was made on April 8th, 1837, when a team of surveyors recorded the low water mark of the spring tide at Poolbeg Lighthouse in Dublin Bay. And for more than 100 years, all the spot heights on Irish ordnance survey maps were calculated relative to that mark, known to the cognoscenti as Ordnance Datum (or OD) Poolbeg.

    But, a single record is not a very accurate measurement of sea level. So, in 1959, OD Poolbeg was replaced by a new datum, based on 10 years' measurements of average sea level at Malin Head in Co Donegal.

    The difference between the two systems is 2.7m, and explains why heights on older Irish maps seem higher than today.

    Source





  • Registered Users Posts: 5,852 ✭✭✭ pauldry


    what id like to know is the sea levels at different stations in ireland say 1970 - 2010 r something like that so we could see (sea) whats happening year on year. Is it in those links above or am i too lazy or both?

    e.g Say Malin Head

    Sea Level

    1970 1.00
    1971 1.01
    1980 1.12
    1990 1.25
    2000 1.4
    2010 1.6

    There something like that where 1 is base. I dunno ...


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