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A Question of Ethics...

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  • 28-01-2017 1:23pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 4,882 ✭✭✭


    Here's a couple of questions:

    Is it ethical for a counsellor or therapist to claim that they are providing CBT when in fact they either

    a. do not have a CBT-specific training or qualification?
    b. have a CBT qualification, but it is not one that is recognised by either of the main CBT professional bodies (i.e. CBT Ireland - formerly NACBT, or the IABCP)?

    Is it ethical for an organisation like IACP to allow counsellors and therapists to claim they provide CBT in the absence of a recognised qualification?

    Would it be ethical if counsellors and therapists to claim they use a CBT-informed approach, rather than claiming to do actual CBT?

    It would be interesting to hear people's views. Even if you take a different approach yourself, how delighted are you at hearing unqualified or underqualified therapists claiming to use your approach?


Comments

  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Entertainment Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Regional East Moderators Posts: 18,371 CMod ✭✭✭✭The Black Oil


    Misrepresentation?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,735 ✭✭✭dar100


    Here's a couple of questions:

    Is it ethical for a counsellor or therapist to claim that they are providing CBT when in fact they either

    a. do not have a CBT-specific training or qualification?
    b. have a CBT qualification, but it is not one that is recognised by either of the main CBT professional bodies (i.e. CBT Ireland - formerly NACBT, or the IABCP)?

    Is it ethical for an organisation like IACP to allow counsellors and therapists to claim they provide CBT in the absence of a recognised qualification?

    Would it be ethical if counsellors and therapists to claim they use a CBT-informed approach, rather than claiming to do actual CBT?

    It would be interesting to hear people's views. Even if you take a different approach yourself, how delighted are you at hearing unqualified or underqualified therapists claiming to use your approach?

    Unethical yes!!

    CBT informed, would be more appropriate, if the person had some training, some modules on their degree and were under the supervision of a CBT supervisor, then I would be ok with the informed part. However, just in the general sense, not working with severe symptoms!!

    I'm no fan of IACP, I'd be of the opinion that if reg comes in, all these counselling bodies should be disbanded and brought in under one new body


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Entertainment Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Regional East Moderators Posts: 18,371 CMod ✭✭✭✭The Black Oil


    dar100 wrote: »
    I'm no fan of IACP, I'd be of the opinion that if reg comes in, all these counselling bodies should be disbanded and brought in under one new body

    Too many egos is what I've heard. :/


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