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Pedestrians Association

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 620 ✭✭✭ LeChienMefiant


    I'd support an Active Travel interest group. I find myself falling in with the Cyclist groups as our interests align to a large extent. There's a guy on twitter called An Cosain in Galway who does something similar. I think Dublin Cycling Campaign and affiliated groups would be very supportive of such a group.


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 62,182 Mod ✭✭✭✭ L1011


    I'd support an Active Travel interest group. I find myself falling in with the Cyclist groups as our interests align to a large extent. There's a guy on twitter called An Cosain in Galway who does something similar. I think Dublin Cycling Campaign and affiliated groups would be very supportive of such a group.

    I find cyclists to be one of the major issues for me as a pedestrian so I wouldn't consider there to be that obvious a synergy between groups.


  • Registered Users Posts: 620 ✭✭✭ LeChienMefiant


    L1011 wrote: »
    I find cyclists to be one of the major issues for me as a pedestrian so I wouldn't consider there to be that obvious a synergy between groups.
    Cyclists are actively campaigning for reduced speed limits and reduced traffic volumes which is the primary synergy I see. Personally I come into "conflict" with motorists much more often than cyclists. Falling to yield crossing footpaths and pedestrian crossings being the main "conflict". Also using their vehicles as a threatening weapon. Cyclists sometimes fail to yield which is annoying, but they're easier to avoid and have less kinetic energy usually.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,269 ✭✭✭ Bigmac1euro


    I think cyclists are the pedestrians enemy here.
    They rally through red lights without warning every single morning almost clipping peds.
    Including myself and others on the path. At least you can hear cars. If you don’t happen to see them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,375 ✭✭✭ Boulevardier


    I have in the past been involved in public transport users' groups, and it has proved extermely difficult to persuade more than a handful of people to get involved.

    Motorists and cyclists have excellent records of moblising their members, but bus/train users have been hopeless. Our only real spokespeople have been the transport companies. I hope pedestrians manage to organise more effectively.

    If any progress is made with this idea, I hope it is publicised on this thread.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 620 ✭✭✭ LeChienMefiant


    zell12 wrote: »
    Did you set up a group, OP?
    It seems to be a growing issue where lobbies for all other transport modes are dominant.

    I think it's badly needed right now if only to support car free areas like College Green, Dublin and Patrick St, Cork.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,021 ✭✭✭ Arcade_Tryer


    Working in tandem with a cycling organisation is a problem: cyclists are a group of road users who present particular challenges to pedestrians.
    Moving objects will always present a problem to pedestrians. However, motorists present a much a bigger problem to both pedestrians and cyclists, than cyclists do to pedestrians. The road death statistics support this year upon year. The problem in our towns and cities is motorists, and over-reliance on the motor vehicle, especially by single vehicle occupants. There is no point sugar-coating anymore. Something drastic needs to happen soon or the deaths will continue to spiral.
    As a pedestrian the actual problems I've faced this week were with cyclists riding in a pedestrianised zone and not stoppinh at a red light. Can't see how either of those are infrastructural.
    They are anecdotal.
    L1011 wrote: »
    I find cyclists to be one of the major issues for me as a pedestrian so I wouldn't consider there to be that obvious a synergy between groups.
    The synergy exists in that both face real and imminent danger from motorists.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 43,967 CMod ✭✭✭✭ magicbastarder


    L1011 wrote: »
    I find cyclists to be one of the major issues for me as a pedestrian so I wouldn't consider there to be that obvious a synergy between groups.
    it's interesting to note that the dublin cycling campaign meetings i've been to - while obviously focussed mainly on cycling issues - do stress the lack of funds spent on 'active travel' (if i have the phrase right); and they'd be delighted to see money spent on pedestrian infrastructure.

    true though, the sort of cyclists who piss off pedestrians are not the sort of cyclists you're likely to see at those meetings.


  • Registered Users Posts: 643 ✭✭✭ Corca Baiscinn


    true though, the sort of cyclists who piss off pedestrians are not the sort of cyclists you're likely to see at those meetings.

    Which makes it a bit frustrating being instructed to tell our "Community" to behave.

    It seems to be hard for people to get their heads around it. On the one hand groups like the Dublin Cycling Campaign represent people who ride bikes in so far as they campaign for better infrastructure/legislation which would improve the lot of bike-riders.

    On the other hand, while they can exhort their members to ride with courtesy and obey the rotr in no way have they any responsibility for evey Tom, Dick and Harriet who cycles.

    It makes sense to tweet @dublinbusnews re the behaviour of a bus-driver because Dublin Bus is responsible by virtue of being the employer but do you ever see anyone tweeting @ConorAAIreland to tell him to get "his" drivers to desist from rlj, blocking yellow boxes etc etc?


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,136 ✭✭✭✭ whisky_galore


    KungFuhrer wrote: »
    Because people die or get maimed.

    Because we're ostracizing people who are older, who have special needs, who live in rural areas.

    I'm not so naive to think that money isn't the great motivator, but surely there must be a drop of human decency left, no?
    We're not "consumers". The government shouldn't regard citizens as such, it's a problematic view. We're people first and foremost. Resignation surely won't change anything.

    People die or are maimed in the 'care' of the HSE, the only thing that makes them sit up and take notice is a court case...things don't improve as a result though.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,642 ✭✭✭ Tenzor07


    Which makes it a bit frustrating being instructed to tell our "Community" to behave.It seems to be hard for people to get their heads around it. On the one hand groups like the Dublin Cycling Campaign represent people who ride bikes in so far as they campaign for better infrastructure/legislation which would improve the lot of bike-riders.
    On the other hand, while they can exhort their members to ride with courtesy and obey the rotr in no way have they any responsibility for evey Tom, Dick and Harriet who cycles. It makes sense to tweet @dublinbusnews re the behaviour of a bus-driver because Dublin Bus is responsible by virtue of being the employer but do you ever see anyone tweeting @ConorAAIreland to tell him to get "his" drivers to desist from rlj, blocking yellow boxes etc etc?

    I think it's interesting(Sad?) to see the views of some, (though typically I would class those as being serial objectors to cycling as a form of transport) who seem to draw a greater affinity with motoring than cycling, possibly because they are primarily motorists and occasional pedestrians, but never bicycle users?


  • Registered Users Posts: 494 ✭✭ Billgirlylegs


    I'd support an Active Travel interest group. I find myself falling in with the Cyclist groups as our interests align to a large extent. There's a guy on twitter called An Cosain in Galway who does something similar. I think Dublin Cycling Campaign and affiliated groups would be very supportive of such a group.

    Cycling has nothing in common with pedestrians.
    It is a form of transport, it belongs on the road. It is traffic
    Not footpaths, not on footpath cycle lanes (I don't think they have universal approval) and (personally) not separate cycling lanes.

    A cyclist can achieve 30kph easily enough.
    Walking pace is 7/8 kph.
    No Comparison.
    Observe cyclists using pedestrian crossings.
    Cyclists are there illegally, but one or two bikes will block the area, and reduce available crossing time.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,642 ✭✭✭ Tenzor07


    Cycling has nothing in common with pedestrians.
    .

    I'd say you're almost completely wrong there..


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,668 ✭✭✭✭ Lumen


    It would be really nice for a thread about the needs of people using one mode of transport (in this case, feet) not degrading into arguments about whether their lives would be easier/safer/happier if people using another mode of transport (cars, bicycles, horses, buses, HGVs etc) would just cop on/stay at home/change mode of transport.

    There is more to walking than crossing roads, surely?


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,668 ✭✭✭✭ Lumen


    For starters, what about the ludicrous proposal to compel by law all walkers to wear high vis?

    Committee Amendments / Dáil Éireann / Road Traffic (Amendment) Bill 2017
    http://www.oireachtas.ie/documents/bills28/bills/2017/10817/b10817d-dcn.pdf


  • Registered Users Posts: 494 ✭✭ Billgirlylegs


    Lumen wrote: »
    It would be really nice for a thread about the needs of people using one mode of transport (in this case, feet) not degrading into arguments about whether their lives would be easier/safer/happier if people using another mode of transport (cars, bicycles, horses, buses, HGVs etc) would just cop on/stay at home/change mode of transport.

    There is more to walking than crossing roads, surely?

    Yes, there is. But the problem is that no one wants to comply with the code of practice(Road Traffic Legislation) when it doesn’t shut them
    And there is Zero interest from the authorities in enforcing them or punishing wrongdoing


  • Registered Users Posts: 620 ✭✭✭ LeChienMefiant


    Largest modal shift crossing the canal cordon is to walking...
    https://www.nationaltransport.ie/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Canal_Cordon_Report_2017.pdf


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,656 ✭✭✭✭ zell12


    Finally a group is set up including Neasa Hourigan
    Green Party. Sustainable Design Specialist. Cllr candidate Dublin Central
    People who are interested in livable, pedestrian friendly streets!
    We are having the first meeting of the Irish Pedestrian Network
    on 26th February at 7.30pm in the Teachers Club, Parnell St. Dublin
    All interest groups and individuals welcome. Skype participation also available.
    https://tinyurl.com/ybc2q725


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,178 ✭✭✭ Working class heroes


    zell12 wrote: »
    Finally a group is set up including Neasa Hourigan
    Green Party. Sustainable Design Specialist. Cllr candidate Dublin Central

    What’s the parking like around that area?

    .



  • Registered Users Posts: 13,576 ✭✭✭✭ loyatemu


    What’s the parking like around that area?

    just stick it on the footpath, be grand.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 16,656 ✭✭✭✭ zell12


    Conor Faughan of the AA tries to explain why it is acceptable to use the footpath as a carpark, even though it's an offence.
    https://www.newstalk.com/podcasts/highlights-from-the-hard-shoulder/parking-pavements-rules-ireland


  • Moderators, Computer Games Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 9,372 Mod ✭✭✭✭ CatInABox


    zell12 wrote: »
    Conor Faughan of the AA tries to explain why it is acceptable to use the footpath as a carpark, even though it's an offence.
    https://www.newstalk.com/podcasts/highlights-from-the-hard-shoulder/parking-pavements-rules-ireland

    Ah, yes, those laws that come under the banner of "Sometimes it's really difficult to not break the law, so it's okay to break those laws."


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