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soil test

  • 29-11-2016 1:45pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 44 ✭✭✭ teddy 1223


    In this soil test does it need 15tonne of lime per hectares


«1

Comments

  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 4,978 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Genghis Cant


    Hi teddy,
    There's nothing attached to your post above!


  • Registered Users Posts: 44 ✭✭✭ teddy 1223


    I couldn't manage to attach the page. But it said it needs 15 tonne of lime per ha, this land never got lime and it's also index 1 for p & k


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,559 pedigree 6


    I think you have to have 40 posts before you can add on attachments or photo's.
    Either go on After Hours and complain about the Brits or go and do the word games in puzzles and quizzes;)
    Or.... maybe you could type out as much as you can of the report.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,995 ✭✭✭ Mooooo


    Apple lime yearly at a rate of 2 tonne/ acre. It will take time to bring it up. With weather being dry could do it this week if ground your way is up to it


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,559 pedigree 6


    teddy 1223 wrote: »
    I couldn't manage to attach the page. But it said it needs 15 tonne of lime per ha, this land never got lime and it's also index 1 for p & k

    Sounds like hungry ground. Does it say anything about molybdenum in the soil?


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 492 ✭✭ The Cuban


    pedigree 6 wrote: »
    Sounds like hungry ground. Does it say anything about molybdenum in the soil?
    Yep its Hungry ground but you will not be able to spread that much lime in one go or in one year.
    Best divide up the applications over the 1st 3rd and 5th years then redo the soil test the following year to see how you are doing


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,469 ✭✭✭ patsy_mccabe


    Teagasc say 3tonne/acre is the max for lime application.

    " And on the riverbank forgotten the river's name."



  • Registered Users Posts: 44 ✭✭✭ teddy 1223


    Mooooo wrote:
    Apple lime yearly at a rate of 2 tonne/ acre. It will take time to bring it up. With weather being dry could do it this week if ground your way is up to it


    Yeah I'll get 2 tonne an acre out at the end of the week.


  • Registered Users Posts: 44 ✭✭✭ teddy 1223


    pedigree 6 wrote:
    Sounds like hungry ground. Does it say anything about molybdenum in the soil?


    It's hungry ground alright. No it doesn't say anything about molybdenum ( what is that by the way). This land wasn't really farmed the last few years


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,559 pedigree 6


    teddy 1223 wrote: »
    It's hungry ground alright. No it doesn't say anything about molybdenum ( what is that by the way). This land wasn't really farmed the last few years

    I bet it does say something about Molybdenum.
    If you have high MO you can't increase the soil ph beyond 6.2.
    It should give a number how much MO is in the soil and whether that's high or low.
    If it's low you can spread the 15t, if high maybe 10t.

    Going by what you're saying, spread the 3t for a start anyway. You could even go to 3.5 if you want.

    Then you have to worry about the P and K requirements.

    Actually what are you going to graze this with? I presume it's grazing ground.
    You probably would be better going for the full plough and reseed if you're serious about it than bother with a field of scutch.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 44 ✭✭✭ teddy 1223


    pedigree 6 wrote:
    I bet it does say something about Molybdenum. If you have high MO you can't increase the soil ph beyond 6.2. It should give a number how much MO is in the soil and whether that's high or low. If it's low you can spread the 15t, if high maybe 10t.


    This is what the sample shows, pH: *water 4.9 *buffer 5.50
    Lime required: 15.00 tonne/ha
    Soil P: * (mg/l) 1.4
    Index 1
    Soil K: * ( mg/l) 54
    Index 1


  • Registered Users Posts: 44 ✭✭✭ teddy 1223


    The last few year's there was 1 cut of silage off it each year. This obviously took all the nutrients out of the land, it wouldn't of got much fertiliser


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,559 pedigree 6


    teddy 1223 wrote: »
    This is what the sample shows, pH: *water 4.9 *buffer 5.50
    Lime required: 15.00 tonne/ha
    Soil P: * (mg/l) 1.4
    Index 1
    Soil K: * ( mg/l) 54
    Index 1
    Fair enough. It needs 15 so.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,535 ✭✭✭ Dickie10


    hi all i did soil test on 3 small fields , they havent got lime in 20+years. there showing 5.3 and 2 of 5.4 for PH Buffer.
    However I am good Phosphorus for them all showing 4 index. Potassium has one field 4 , the next 3 and the next 2.

    Any ideas what sort of tell tale signs that shows of my land in those fields?
    why so high in phosphorus? those fields never get slurry.

    What is a potassium source ?


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 12,031 Mod ✭✭✭✭ blue5000


    Muriate of potash, 50%k, but don't apply it to grazing ground in early spring as cows wlll get grass tetany from Mg deficiency.

    If the seat's wet, sit on yer hat, a cool head is better than a wet ar5e.



  • Registered Users Posts: 67 ✭✭ sandman30


    Dickie10 wrote: »
    hi all i did soil test on 3 small fields , they havent got lime in 20+years. there showing 5.3 and 2 of 5.4 for PH Buffer.
    However I am good Phosphorus for them all showing 4 index. Potassium has one field 4 , the next 3 and the next 2.

    Any ideas what sort of tell tale signs that shows of my land in those fields?
    why so high in phosphorus? those fields never get slurry.

    What is a potassium source ?

    Where did you get it tested?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,535 ✭✭✭ Dickie10


    oldcastle lab , ill put up the report


  • Registered Users Posts: 67 ✭✭ sandman30


    Dickie10 wrote: »
    oldcastle lab , ill put up the report

    I thought it might be. Waste of time getting tested there. I'm testing fairly regularly and the results back from there made no sense, no consistency between years. Couldn't understand what was happening.

    Anyway took 10 samples, but took double the amount for each sample, broke the cores up and divided the samples, sent 10 to teagasc and 10 to Oldcastle. Completely different results, the teagasc results were right, Oldcastle were pure muck.

    Ignore the very high reading for P, if it is not what was expected, ideally get tested again elsewhere.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,535 ✭✭✭ Dickie10


    Christ, thats disastrous when you go to the trouble of getting soil tests done. can you recommend any other places that do soil test? should i just give to teagasc advisor? i presume i need at least 2 ton lime to acre anyway, im sure they could get the ph right at least, those fields havent got lime in 20 years


  • Registered Users Posts: 891 ✭✭✭ einn32


    Dickie10 wrote: »
    Christ, thats disastrous when you go to the trouble of getting soil tests done. can you recommend any other places that do soil test? should i just give to teagasc advisor? i presume i need at least 2 ton lime to acre anyway, im sure they could get the ph right at least, those fields havent got lime in 20 years

    Call the lab and tell them the background info. They might do a re-test or find an error.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 67 ✭✭ sandman30


    Dickie10 wrote: »
    Christ, thats disastrous when you go to the trouble of getting soil tests done. can you recommend any other places that do soil test? should i just give to teagasc advisor? i presume i need at least 2 ton lime to acre anyway, im sure they could get the ph right at least, those fields havent got lime in 20 years

    I find Teagasc good, but expensive. I think you're safe enough with the 2 ton of lime. I found the pH was slightly off, they said it needed more lime than it actually did, but the P was seriously wrong, testing index 4, when it was index 1 and 2. Soil tests are such a small cost in relation to the cost of fertilizer, that its worth having them done right.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,654 ✭✭✭ White Clover


    sandman30 wrote: »
    I find Teagasc good, but expensive. I think you're safe enough with the 2 ton of lime. I found the pH was slightly off, they said it needed more lime than it actually did, but the P was seriously wrong, testing index 4, when it was index 1 and 2. Soil tests are such a small cost in relation to the cost of fertilizer, that its worth having them done right.

    It is important to do them at the correct time too.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,535 ✭✭✭ Dickie10


    yeah im snookered a bit now because i have fertiliser applied in the last few weeks so it will throw it off. i will go and get lime out anyway. i put lime on a field 2 years ago and can keep grass down with sheep and lambs in march and april on it, drove grass out of it with no fertiliser, i will soil test that field now this week before slurry as it got silage off last week and see is there a jump in ph, i will send this one to teagasc


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,471 ✭✭✭ SouthWesterly


    Was chatting to some guys at an organic farm walk last week in kerry.
    They recommended this guy for full soil tests. https://apsbioag.ie/


  • Registered Users Posts: 891 ✭✭✭ einn32


    Can you show the results sheet?


  • Registered Users Posts: 67 ✭✭ sandman30


    Was chatting to some guys at an organic farm walk last week in kerry.
    They recommended this guy for full soil tests. https://apsbioag.ie/

    They seem to sell fertilizer as well as doing the tests, personally don't think that's a good idea. Prefer if the lab is completely independent.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,471 ✭✭✭ SouthWesterly


    sandman30 wrote: »
    They seem to sell fertilizer as well as doing the tests, personally don't think that's a good idea. Prefer if the lab is completely independent.

    From what I gather Leslie does a full soil test, testing for whats actually in the soil.


  • Registered Users Posts: 891 ✭✭✭ einn32


    From what I gather Leslie does a full soil test, testing for whats actually in the soil.

    Are agri soil tests just for P, K and pH usually?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,155 ✭✭✭ Castlekeeper


    einn32 wrote: »
    Are agri soil tests just for P, K and pH usually?

    Yes, and only test what's water solouble/ leachable, not for the total elements of the soil.

    Leslie is straight and won't damage your land.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,155 ✭✭✭ Castlekeeper


    sandman30 wrote: »
    I thought it might be. Waste of time getting tested there. I'm testing fairly regularly and the results back from there made no sense, no consistency between years. Couldn't understand what was happening.

    Anyway took 10 samples, but took double the amount for each sample, broke the cores up and divided the samples, sent 10 to teagasc and 10 to Oldcastle. Completely different results, the teagasc results were right, Oldcastle were pure muck.

    Ignore the very high reading for P, if it is not what was expected, ideally get tested again elsewhere.

    Did you ask them to explain the difference in results? I wonder is their methodology different and if there's something to be learnt from them.
    There can be high levels of non water soluble but biologically available P and K in soils that a Morgan's test won't show.

    They might be some chancers too of course!


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