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Koran is "prescribed material" for Leaving Cert Arabic.

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Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,993 ✭✭✭✭ recedite


    Why? We have developed our own syllabus, and it was reviewed in 2004, and it's now being reviewed again.
    It looks like we are using a syllabus that was developed in Libya, by the School for International Martyrs.
    Why should Syrian Christians have to be consulted any more than Irish Muslims..
    Both should be consulted. The Syrian Christians are particulary valuable because they speak Arabic,which I doubt many people in the NCCA can do. Therefore they can provide an outside (of Islam) perspective on whether the syllabus is overly Islamified.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 752 ✭✭✭ Lurkio


    Pherekydes wrote: »
    122 last year. Not sure how many are affected, as per the OP.

    I wonder how many come from non-Arabic speaking backgrounds. Somebody I knew a long time ago who spoke and taught a number of languages (all European) found it extremely challenging.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 752 ✭✭✭ Lurkio


    recedite wrote: »
    Your link is a bit out of date. Colonel Gadaffi is dead. Libya has since descended into chaos, with different regions run by various warlords, including those allied to ISIS. I doubt there are very many expat kids being educated there nowadays.

    Besides, this thread is about students sitting the Leaving Cert exam in Ireland.
    Perhaps we are using a LC syllabus developed in Libya for historical reasons, ie nobody actually sat the exam in Ireland back in Gadaffi's day.
    So nobody in Ireland cared what was in it.

    However the situation has changed now. Its time we developed our own Arabic syllabus, and the Irish-based Syrian Christians as mentioned in the OP should be among those consulted when designing the new syllabus.

    Thanks for admitting you were entirely wrong and your mosque related conspiracy theories have no basis in fact whatsoever.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,640 ✭✭✭✭ meeeeh


    recedite wrote: »
    Your link is a bit out of date. Colonel Gadaffi is dead. Libya has since descended into chaos, with different regions run by various warlords, including those allied to ISIS. I doubt there are very many expat kids being educated there nowadays.

    Besides, this thread is about students sitting the Leaving Cert exam in Ireland.
    Perhaps we are using a LC syllabus developed in Libya for historical reasons, ie nobody actually sat the exam in Ireland back in Gadaffi's day.
    So nobody in Ireland cared what was in it.

    However the situation has changed now. Its time we developed our own Arabic syllabus, and the Irish-based Syrian Christians as mentioned in the OP should be among those consulted when designing the new syllabus.
    Just stop digging...


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,993 ✭✭✭✭ recedite


    Lurkio wrote: »
    Thanks for admitting you were entirely wrong and your mosque related conspiracy theories have no basis in fact whatsoever.
    On the contrary, it seems I was right, but the mosque was in Libya, not in Ireland.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,993 ✭✭✭✭ recedite


    Pherekydes wrote: »
    122 last year. Not sure how many are affected, as per the OP.
    Is it three state funded primary schools using Arabic in the classroom, plus more in the planning stages?
    It is very predictable that there will be year on year increases in the numbers taking this exam over the coming decades.
    We can take the view "ah let them teach what they like, sure there's only a few and it doesn't affect the rest of us".
    Or we can take an interest and exert some control over what is being taught. I'm pretty sure if the Belgians could go back in time a few decades, they would do things differently.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 752 ✭✭✭ Lurkio


    recedite wrote: »
    On the contrary, it seems I was right, but the mosque was in Libya, not in Ireland.

    The funny thing about this is that the only thing you're doing is highlighting the flaws in your own thinking. One of the top hospitals in new York is the New York Presbyterian. Does this mean it only caters to Presbyterians? Does it enforce Presbyterian ideology abroad? No, its just a name, related to the religion and culture of the time when it was founded, and basing ideas as regards what it stands for merely on its name is ridiculous. Likewise picking up on a religious title because it happens to have a muslim background. As I may have said earlier, if you dropped the "waah, muslims" approach to analysing the information presented to you, it would put you in much better stead.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,884 ✭✭✭✭ One eyed Jack


    recedite wrote: »
    It looks like we are using a syllabus that was developed in Libya, by the School for International Martyrs.


    It's the other way round, and you know it's the other way round because it's been referenced numerous times already.

    Both should be consulted. The Syrian Christians are particulary valuable because they speak Arabic,which I doubt many people in the NCCA can do. Therefore they can provide an outside (of Islam) perspective on whether the syllabus is overly Islamified.


    Did you miss that list of contributors to the syllabus I posted already? What you're suggesting is ridiculous, because being able to speak a language doesn't mean you can sit a Leaving Certificate standard examination in the language!

    I can speak and write in several languages, nothing to do with the fact that I'm an Irish Christian, I still wouldn't be qualified to devise an examination on those languages, nor would I do very well if I sat a Leaving Certificate examination in those languages, simply because I wouldn't be familiar enough with the literature. I'm familiar with the Koran and a few other religious texts, but that has nothing to do with my religion either.

    In the same way - a Syrian Christian should have no issue with the Koran being used to examine their knowledge of the Arabic language. They're being examined for their knowledge of the language, not their knowledge of Islam.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 752 ✭✭✭ Lurkio


    recedite wrote: »
    Is it three state funded primary schools using Arabic in the classroom, plus more in the planning stages?
    It is very predictable that there will be year on year increases in the numbers taking this exam over the coming decades.
    We can take the view "ah let them teach what they like, sure there's only a few and it doesn't affect the rest of us".
    Or we can take an interest and exert some control over what is being taught. I'm pretty sure if the Belgians could go back in time a few decades, they would do things differently.

    None of that really has any relation to the topic at hand. Essentially you've just decided to post "But Muslims!!!Like Belgium!1!!!!" with zero regard for context or the facts of the exam in question. There really is no point in saying one is a non-believer in religious faith when one replaces it with an equally fallacious and perhaps far more dangerous self made view of the world.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,884 ✭✭✭✭ One eyed Jack


    recedite wrote: »
    On the contrary, it seems I was right, but the mosque was in Libya, not in Ireland.


    A mosque isn't a school? You were just wrong, and you were wrong since the outset of this thread, and you're grasping at straws since to try and make something out of nothing.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,993 ✭✭✭✭ recedite


    Religion is embedded into the education systems of middle eastern countries even more so than it is here. You are naive if you think a syllabus that originates in Libya has not been influenced and approved by the Imams there.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 752 ✭✭✭ Lurkio


    recedite wrote: »
    Religion is embedded into the education systems of middle eastern countries even more so than it is here. You are naive if you think a syllabus that originates in Libya has not been influenced and approved by the Imams there.

    Prove it please, specifically with regard to the Arabic LC course. None of your "But Belgium!!!!" nonsense either please.


  • Registered Users Posts: 432 ✭✭ booksale


    sorry to dig up the old thread. Anyone know when then the Koran was made non-mandatory? Is it the year after this complaint went on the news? Or a few years later? I notice that the Arabic curriculum was updated in 2019. But I wonder whether candidates in 2017, 2018 and 2019 still needed to study Koran.

    MILLION THANKS.



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