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Should Parents allow their teenage children alcohol?

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  • 06-04-2016 6:26pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 3


    I'm just wondering how people feel letting their teenage children drink alcohol in their own home? Conflicting thoughts about this as I don't want to endorse the drinking of alcohol and am aware that legally wise it may be OK within the home,it is illegal outside of the home.
    Any thoughts appreciated. Thanks.


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 32,513 ✭✭✭✭Lucyfur


    At what age? I've a 13 year old. He is absolutely not allowed alcohol, nor does he have any interest in it (yet). If he was 17? Yeah, maybe a glass of beer, or a small glass of wine with a meal. My family is littered with alcoholism. I'm very conscious of it, but I also feel that ''normalised'' drinking at home (on an occasion, I'm not advocating handing your teen a whiskey on a Tuesday night :pac:) lessens the need for teens to go out an get blathered in a field/barn/bus shelter/free house. I'm very open with my son about the dangers of excessive drinking. He's seen family members die from alcoholism. But he's also seen me sit and have wine at the weekend, have friends over for drinks etc. If he does go on to drink himself, I'd hope that growing up with awareness and a healthy approach will stand to him.


  • Registered Users Posts: 411 ✭✭blackbird 49


    A few year back when my eldest son was nearly sixteen his friends and him(as we found out later on) had hatched a plan to going drinking in the fields near us, they each told their parents they were sleeping in each other houses, One of the parents put 2 and 2 together, when i asked my son was were they going to do when the middle of the night when going to sleep, he looked at me said they didnt know as they had a plan Abut no plan B, All thankfully worked out in the end, after that we let him have a drink at home and family gatherings and i found that a few people i knew who did the same that when their kids came 18 it wasnt such a big deal, so yes i would


  • Registered Users Posts: 3 Angel777


    Many thanks for your replies. My teenager is still a little young at the moment but just trying to get organised!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,707 ✭✭✭BeardySi


    Yes.

    Making alcohol the forbidden fruit is what causes problems. If it's normalised it loses a lot of its attraction. I used to get (watered) wine at special occasions from when I was about 8 or 9 and could drink beer/cider at home occasionally from 14 or so (indeed we were drinking in pubs at 15 but they were different days! ;) ). While I won't say I never went out and got pissed as a teenager we always drank reasonably sensibly and never really went off the rails. I've always felt a sensible approach to the issue goes a long way in encouraging mature drinking habits later one...


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 565 ✭✭✭enzo roco


    Treadhead wrote: »
    Yes.

    Making alcohol the forbidden fruit is what causes problems

    And I dont think that only applies to teenagers.

    The whole country has a problem, with our attitude towards alcohol.
    Sure even as an Adult, Im apparently a loser if I dont go out for drinks at the weekend.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,809 ✭✭✭Speedwell


    My parents never had a problem with wine with dinner, and if we kids wanted some, we were allowed a sip, or just a little dribble in our own glass. Our family was very much a "drink is part of the meal" household, and overdrinking was as bad as stuffing your face with all the cookies or eating someone else's dinner.

    I got to like Scotch in my late 30s. I just sip the occasional dram, no mystery or thrill about it other than a warm feeling from the drink, of course. I was introducing my sister-in-law to a particularly nice bottle I picked up in Heathrow duty-free, and her 17-year-old son wanted to try it. "Michael, you are going to hate it," I said. "You literally have too many taste buds in the wrong places at your age." This, to the best of my knowledge, is actually true. A good Scotch gets better, not with its age, but with yours. :) He wanted to try it anyway, so I poured him a little and said, "Don't blame me if you think it's terrible." He tasted it and spit it out. I made him apologize to the hundred-and-fifty-euro bottle. "Don't let me catch you drinking anything but the good stuff, because the bad stuff isn't worth it. And don't let me catch you doing that until you can be a connoisseur." He and I laughed. He's just nerdy enough that I think he'll be a wine and whisky snob before he even likes the stuff. :)


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,012 ✭✭✭2RockMountain


    Treadhead wrote: »
    Yes.

    Making alcohol the forbidden fruit is what causes problems. If it's normalised it loses a lot of its attraction. I used to get (watered) wine at special occasions from when I was about 8 or 9 and could drink beer/cider at home occasionally from 14 or so (indeed we were drinking in pubs at 15 but they were different days! ;) ). While I won't say I never went out and got pissed as a teenager we always drank reasonably sensibly and never really went off the rails. I've always felt a sensible approach to the issue goes a long way in encouraging mature drinking habits later one...

    I recall seeing some research in recent years that contradicted this - that introducing kids to alcohol in the controlled environment in the home actually enabled them to drink more at younger ages than their peers who didn't have access to alcohol.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,831 ✭✭✭CelticRambler


    I was reared in the tradition of taking the pledge till you were 18, and (apart from the lads who were happy enough to break the pledge at 14/15/16) the sense of anticipation coming up to your 18th birthday and being able to get stocious was mental. Between that and getting off your head on a Friday/Saturday and on the night of the debs, and then in university ... Well, I wasn't one of that crowd (can't stand the taste of beer or spirits) and couldn't be doing with the whole "got to be drunk to have fun" thing in 90s Ireland, so I left.

    Rearing my own children, there was none of that taboo. We'd have wine with dinner on special occasions (they didn't have to be that special!) and the children would get the same as the adults. None of this watering down business either - just a (much) smaller glass that they'd stretch out to last as long as the main course, the same as us adults. The odd time we'd have a bottle of something else open and the children would ask for a taste, they'd get a taste. Nine times out of ten they'd think it was disgusting; end of interest.

    Now they're all late-teens and older and none of them has the slightest interest in binge-drinking, nor do they need "dutch courage" to chat up someone they fancy or whatever. My eldest (21 this year) particularly likes cider (French, half the strength of Irish/British cider) so I'd nearly always have a bottle in the fridge for him when he comes home, and he'll make it last a week - the same as me and a bottle of wine, if there's no-one to share it with!


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,809 ✭✭✭Speedwell


    I recall seeing some research in recent years that contradicted this - that introducing kids to alcohol in the controlled environment in the home actually enabled them to drink more at younger ages than their peers who didn't have access to alcohol.

    It's not the amount they drink, but how they drink. I'm sure if you added up all the dribbles and sips and "might as well serve out the rest of the bottle I used just a cup for in the dinner" over a year, it would have looked like a lot, but I hate feeling drunk and I would never have been, then or now.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,262 ✭✭✭naughtysmurf


    We allow our 17 year old a couple of cans of cider maybe a couple of times a month, he done the dog at a party we were throwing last year, he suffered, we have all been there, he now limits himself to a couple, he is sensible enough, much prefer this than him in a field somewhere


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  • Registered Users Posts: 18,343 ✭✭✭✭silverharp


    My son developed a liking for a german non alcoholic beer like drink called malzbier a couple of years back when he was 9, so we are on notice ;-) . We don't want to give alcohol any kind of "taboo" status. My attitude is just to reinforce the idea that being drunk is a dumb thing to do on the simple basis that he will ruin his night out and he will have more fun if he isn't drunk. He is 11 now and at holidays he is allowed non alcoholic beer. Play it by ear when he is older

    A belief in gender identity involves a level of faith as there is nothing tangible to prove its existence which, as something divorced from the physical body, is similar to the idea of a soul. - Colette Colfer



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,831 ✭✭✭CelticRambler


    We allow our 17 year old a couple of cans of cider maybe a couple of times a month ... much prefer this than him in a field somewhere

    A while back I was hoping to organise some Franco-Irish evening events in Ireland and came face-to-face with the Irish licensing laws, specifically the rules kicking "children" out of a venue after 9pm when alcohol is being sold. Supposedly this is to stop them learning bad habits! :pac:

    My first reaction was exactly the same: better have them drinking under supervision than going it alone in a field somewhere. :rolleyes:


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,238 ✭✭✭Claw Hammer


    Teenagers under 18 are children. Children should not be given alcohol and should not be allowed consume it.The reason there is so much teenage drinking is because of irresponsible parenting. Alcohol is introduced in to every significant occasion in childrens lives.It is no wonder they associate drink with enjoyment and regard itb as a neccessity.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,809 ✭✭✭Speedwell


    Teenagers under 18 are children. Children should not be given alcohol and should not be allowed consume it.The reason there is so much teenage drinking is because of irresponsible parenting. Alcohol is introduced in to every significant occasion in childrens lives.It is no wonder they associate drink with enjoyment and regard itb as a neccessity.

    Take the stick out.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,238 ✭✭✭Claw Hammer


    Speedwell wrote: »
    Take the stick out.

    Parents aren't allowed to punish their children any more.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,809 ✭✭✭Speedwell


    Parents aren't allowed to punish their children any more.

    The one up your spine. Honestly, are you a leftover member of the Temperance League?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 12,687 ✭✭✭✭Penny Tration


    Teenagers under 18 are children. Children should not be given alcohol and should not be allowed consume it.The reason there is so much teenage drinking is because of irresponsible parenting. Alcohol is introduced in to every significant occasion in childrens lives.It is no wonder they associate drink with enjoyment and regard itb as a neccessity.


    Really? Cause out of my friends and I, I was the only one allowed drink as a teenager (the odd alcopop or beer at 16, once I asked permission, whatever I wanted at 17 once I told my folks). I'm the only one who didn't go knacker drinking in fields or town, and at 27, while I've had two bad drunken incidents in my early twenties, I'm the only one who doesn't binge drink (i wouldn't hit the 14 units a week women are recommended to stay beneath), and one of the few who hasn't drunkenly gotten impregnated.


    Alcohol isn't taboo. making it so, makes it more desirable.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,238 ✭✭✭Claw Hammer


    Really? Cause out of my friends and I, I was the only one allowed drink as a teenager (the odd alcopop or beer at 16, once I asked permission, whatever I wanted at 17 once I told my folks). I'm the only one who didn't go knacker drinking in fields or town, and at 27, while I've had two bad drunken incidents in my early twenties, I'm the only one who doesn't binge drink (i wouldn't hit the 14 units a week women are recommended to stay beneath), and one of the few who hasn't drunkenly gotten impregnated.


    Alcohol isn't taboo. making it so, makes it more desirable.

    One swallow doesn't make a summer.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,809 ✭✭✭Speedwell


    One swallow doesn't make a summer.

    Or an alcoholic.


  • Registered Users Posts: 698 ✭✭✭SuperRabbit


    Alcohol, yes. Smartphones, no.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 855 ✭✭✭mickoneill31


    One swallow doesn't make a summer.

    Its not one swallow. Everybody else in this thread posted positive experiences. There's only one negative poster. Is that the swallow you're referring to?


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,238 ✭✭✭Claw Hammer


    Its not one swallow. Everybody else in this thread posted positive experiences. There's only one negative poster. Is that the swallow you're referring to?

    Not understood.


  • Registered Users Posts: 195 ✭✭toptom


    Parents aren't allowed to punish their children any more.

    Unfortunately, And thats why we're in this mess with youth crime and binge drinking. Drinking age should be 21 nowadays. Teenagers brains arent developed enough to handle alcohol.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 17,388 ✭✭✭✭Jayop


    Teenagers under 18 are children. Children should not be given alcohol and should not be allowed consume it.The reason there is so much teenage drinking is because of irresponsible parenting. Alcohol is introduced in to every significant occasion in childrens lives.It is no wonder they associate drink with enjoyment and regard itb as a neccessity.

    Rubbish. Explain how the likes of the French, Spanish, Portuguese and the rest are all such sensible drinkers compared to us when you see them giving drink to their kids at home as a matter of course.
    Parents aren't allowed to punish their children any more.

    Really? Try telling my kids that if they lose their phone or games console for a week. Either of them would probably prefer a smack to the other types of punishment that actually require a parent to do some parenting rather than just thumping the kids.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,685 ✭✭✭flutered


    Teenagers under 18 are children. Children should not be given alcohol and should not be allowed consume it.The reason there is so much teenage drinking is because of irresponsible parenting. Alcohol is introduced in to every significant occasion in childrens lives.It is no wonder they associate drink with enjoyment and regard itb as a neccessity.

    yet in some parts of europe they drink wine with meals from a young age, is this country on the road to be the most nanny place in the planet outside of north korea


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,238 ✭✭✭Claw Hammer


    Jayop wrote: »
    Rubbish. Explain how the likes of the French, Spanish, Portuguese and the rest are all such sensible drinkers compared to us when you see them giving drink to their kids at home as a matter of course.



    Really? Try telling my kids that if they lose their phone or games console for a week. Either of them would probably prefer a smack to the other types of punishment that actually require a parent to do some parenting rather than just thumping the kids.

    There is nothing sensible about giving drink to children. the parents own drinking pattern is irrelevant.
    Not having a phone or games console is not punishment. All it is doing is making them even more spoilt.


  • Registered Users Posts: 195 ✭✭toptom


    My eldest when he were a teen got brought home by the guards when he was 15 in thurles at the feile 91, Legless he was, Our family were mortified about it.
    He didn't see a drink again till he was 18 because we kept our eye on him and pretty much grounded him from then on. Once was enough in our house it wasnt going to occur again


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 17,388 ✭✭✭✭Jayop


    There is nothing sensible about giving drink to children. the parents own drinking pattern is irrelevant.
    Not having a phone or games console is not punishment. All it is doing is making them even more spoilt.

    lol right-o

    So all the countries that have a sensible approach to drinking are wrong and you are right.


    So tell me, how should you punish a child (if you were legally allowed)?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,271 ✭✭✭Elemonator


    I was allowed at 16, but only one. You are right when you say that allowing a small bit at home goes a long way towards reducing the need to get mongoed in the local field (not that the Gardai seemed to care when we did, all they cared about was our camp fire going out of control).

    But you need to be careful, I know a few people who got the sense of rampant adventurism at the age of just 13 and eventually moved onto drugs. Trying to live up to a reputation methinks.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,238 ✭✭✭Claw Hammer


    Jayop wrote: »
    lol right-o

    So all the countries that have a sensible approach to drinking are wrong and you are right.


    So tell me, how should you punish a child (if you were legally allowed)?
    Countries do not have an approach to drinking. Individuals do. This giving drink to children is all about people feling virtuous about doing something about the fact that some so called adults behave irresponsibly. The punishment should fit the crime.


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