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Best/Worst Winters in Ireland

  • 17-08-2015 2:46pm
    #1
    Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,995 Schadenfreudia


    gilly2308 wrote: »
    It is lovely to look at, but we are completely incapable of dealing with snow in this country, and any Winter without snow is a good winter in my book.

    I think that overstates things a bit!

    December 2010 was the snowiest month in my lifetime and the coldest month ever recorded, yet despite (in Dublin) snow falling on 17 separate days and accumulating on two occasions to over a foot - the city was largely unaffected,

    And I recall travelling one morning on the brand new motorway to Limerick with the temperature registering -15C yet the road was so well treated that traffic was flowing at 120kph.

    And I remember returning that evening and despite a cloudless sunny day the snow cover was intact everywhere - the max was about -4C!

    In some cases immediately after a heavy fall traffic would slow but the ploughs cleared the motorways and most roads in Dublin very quickly.

    Never had to postpone a single trip during that month!

    So bring on Snowmageddon and let's test the system again :)


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,279 ✭✭✭ snowstreams


    And I recall travelling one morning on the brand new motorway to Limerick with the temperature registering -15C yet the road was so well treated that traffic was flowing at 120kph....

    I think we all got a bit more used to it as time went by. The slow lane in the motorways were fully treated but I do remember the fast lanes had icy patches, which made overtaking challenging! So you ended up maybe adding 20 minutes on the Galway to Dublin journey.

    It got to -16c here a good few mornings in Galway and it did take its toll on some peoples pipes.
    But overall those inconveniences were worth it in my opinion!


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,033 ✭✭✭ Oneiric 3


    sryanbruen wrote: »
    Hopefully we get a SNOWY Winter! Not a stormy one like Winter 2013 / 14 which was absolutely horrible

    I wouldn't class Winter 2013/14 as being a stormy one - certainly not around these parts at least - but there was consistent frequency of high winds that gave it some interest. Really hoping for a proper stormy winter this this time around, the stronger the better. We are well overdue some full on, hardcore Atlantic storms at this stage.

    New Moon



  • Registered Users Posts: 12,557 ✭✭✭✭ sryanbruen


    Oneiric 3 wrote: »
    I wouldn't class Winter 2013/14 as being a stormy one - certainly not around these parts at least - but there was consistent frequency of high winds that gave it some interest. Really hoping for a proper stormy winter this this time around, the stronger the better. We are well overdue some full on, hardcore Atlantic storms at this stage.

    Yeah it was a VERY stormy one! STORM after STORM after STORM! It was the wettest and stormiest Winter on record as a matter of fact. Though at my station, Grange it wasn't the wettest!

    Weather and climate site - https://www.ukandirelandclimate.com/ (advised to view on PC, not optimised for mobile)

    Photography site - https://www.sryanbruenphoto.com/



  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,995 Schadenfreudia


    sryanbruen wrote: »
    It was the wettest and stormiest Winter on record as a matter of fact. Though at my station, Grange it wasn't the wettest!

    Mine neither...so where was it the wettest and stormiest on record? :confused:


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,557 ✭✭✭✭ sryanbruen


    Mine neither...so where was it the wettest and stormiest on record? :confused:

    Ireland and the UK as a whole!

    Weather and climate site - https://www.ukandirelandclimate.com/ (advised to view on PC, not optimised for mobile)

    Photography site - https://www.sryanbruenphoto.com/



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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,033 ✭✭✭ Oneiric 3


    sryanbruen wrote: »
    Yeah it was a VERY stormy one! STORM after STORM after STORM! It was the wettest and stormiest Winter on record as a matter of fact.

    For your region, I have no doubt, but this chart showing number of winter days with windspeeds exceeding BF6 at Belmullet suggests the contrary for the W/NW coast.

    358961.png

    I for one certainly recall stormier winters than winter 2013-2014 in my locality.

    New Moon



  • Registered Users Posts: 12,557 ✭✭✭✭ sryanbruen


    I for one certainly recall stormier winters than winter 2013-2014 in my locality.[/QUOTE]

    Here's Grange's windspeeds and rainfall (rounded to nearest unit) during a couple of storms I can recall during the Winter of 2013 / 14

    Dec 5th 2013: 65mph / 3mm
    Dec 18th 2013: 70mph / 24mm
    Dec 23rd / 24th 2013: 75mph / 6mm
    Dec 30th / 31st 2013: 55mph / 17mm
    Jan 1st 2014: 55mph / 4mm
    Jan 3rd 2014: 70mph / 3mm
    Jan 5th 2014: 60mph / 7mm
    Jan 24th 2014: 60mph / 13mm
    Jan 26th 2014: 60mph / 5mm
    Jan 31st 2014: 60mph / 12mm
    Feb 1st 2014: 70mph / 9mm
    Feb 4th / 5th 2014: 60mph / 18mm
    Feb 7th / 8th 2014: 60mph / 14mm
    Feb 12th 2014: 75mph / 8mm

    Though it continued unsettled for the rest of February, it wasn't that stormy!

    Weather and climate site - https://www.ukandirelandclimate.com/ (advised to view on PC, not optimised for mobile)

    Photography site - https://www.sryanbruenphoto.com/



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,378 BuilderPlumber


    sryanbruen wrote: »
    Yeah it was a VERY stormy one! STORM after STORM after STORM! It was the wettest and stormiest Winter on record as a matter of fact. Though at my station, Grange it wasn't the wettest!

    The period from around mid December to February 12 in 2013/14 was awful. There were way too many storms and the one on February 12 was the worst since the ones in 1997 and 1998. Plus, it was an unusual time to get weather like this as bad. I remember another bad storm that time on St Stephen's Day.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 313 ✭✭ gilly0512


    I think that overstates things a bit!

    December 2010 was the snowiest month in my lifetime and the coldest month ever recorded, yet despite (in Dublin) snow falling on 17 separate days and accumulating on two occasions to over a foot - the city was largely unaffected,

    And I recall travelling one morning on the brand new motorway to Limerick with the temperature registering -15C yet the road was so well treated that traffic was flowing at 120kph.

    And I remember returning that evening and despite a cloudless sunny day the snow cover was intact everywhere - the max was about -4C!

    In some cases immediately after a heavy fall traffic would slow but the ploughs cleared the motorways and most roads in Dublin very quickly.

    Never had to postpone a single trip during that month!

    So bring on Snowmageddon and let's test the system again :)

    I couldn't disagree more, I live in Kildare and commute to Dublin on a daily basis, and commuting to and from Dublin was a nightmare during the heavy snowfalls of 2009 and 2010. I recall one horrendous commute from Newlands Cross to Kildare taking over four hours, and don't make me laugh going on about snow ploughs, I don't thing I ever saw one during the aforementioned Winters.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,995 Schadenfreudia


    gilly2308 wrote: »
    I couldn't disagree more, I live in Kildare and commute to Dublin on a daily basis, and commuting to and from Dublin was a nightmare during the heavy snowfalls of 2009 and 2010. I recall one horrendous commute from Newlands Cross to Kildare taking over four hours, and don't make me laugh going on about snow ploughs, I don't thing I ever saw one during the aforementioned Winters.

    Well I cannot account for that - but the work I was doing at the time saw me travelling extensively across the country right through that month - there were snowploughs, absolute fact - I saw them all the time - they are attached to the front of the gritting trucks - which were also ubiquitous at the time (and still are whenever a frost is forecast).

    We cope as well as anywhere else with intermittent winter snow - so bring it on :)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 12,557 ✭✭✭✭ sryanbruen


    The period from around mid December to February 12 in 2013/14 was awful. There were way too many storms and the one on February 12 was the worst since the ones in 1997 and 1998. Plus, it was an unusual time to get weather like this as bad. I remember another bad storm that time on St Stephen's Day.

    Yeah it hit during St. Stephen's Night but Friday, December 27th was badly affected by strong winds

    Weather and climate site - https://www.ukandirelandclimate.com/ (advised to view on PC, not optimised for mobile)

    Photography site - https://www.sryanbruenphoto.com/



  • Registered Users Posts: 12,557 ✭✭✭✭ sryanbruen


    gilly2308 wrote: »
    I couldn't disagree more, I live in Kildare and commute to Dublin on a daily basis, and commuting to and from Dublin was a nightmare during the heavy snowfalls of 2009 and 2010. I recall one horrendous commute from Newlands Cross to Kildare taking over four hours, and don't make me laugh going on about snow ploughs, I don't thing I ever saw one during the aforementioned Winters.

    January 1979, 1982 and 1987 are the ones that I can recall with such snowfall on the ground.

    Weather and climate site - https://www.ukandirelandclimate.com/ (advised to view on PC, not optimised for mobile)

    Photography site - https://www.sryanbruenphoto.com/



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,347 ✭✭✭✭ MJohnston


    Well I cannot account for that - but the work I was doing at the time saw me travelling extensively across the country right through that month - there were snowploughs, absolute fact - I saw them all the time - they are attached to the front of the gritting trucks - which were also ubiquitous at the time (and still are whenever a frost is forecast).

    We cope as well as anywhere else with intermittent winter snow - so bring it on :)

    I think South Co Dublin was worst affected by the snow thanks to the proliferation of rear-wheel drive German cars in that part of the country ;)


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,995 Schadenfreudia


    MJohnston wrote: »
    I think South Co Dublin was worst affected by the snow thanks to the proliferation of rear-wheel drive German cars in that part of the country ;)

    Strictly front wheel drive here - worst part of any journey is going up the lane to the main road.

    And I only ever drive Japanese.....:cool:


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,347 ✭✭✭✭ MJohnston


    Strictly front wheel drive here - worst part of any journey is going up the lane to the main road.

    And I only ever drive Japanese.....:cool:

    I was referring to these kinds of scenes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLM9xHmLGHE :)


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,995 Schadenfreudia


    MJohnston wrote: »
    I was referring to these kinds of scenes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLM9xHmLGHE :)

    Seems the slower they drove the more likely they were to slide! Can't say I can identify the makes under the snow cover...but I did see a gritter armed with a snow plough swinging into action!


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,347 ✭✭✭✭ MJohnston


    If memory serves, this was the second major snowfall, weeks after the 27th November (ish) inches had been sort of compacted into very hard ice, but never had a chance to thaw, and then more snow added on top of that. Exceptionally rare conditions, I would imagine.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,995 Schadenfreudia


    MJohnston wrote: »
    If memory serves, this was the second major snowfall, weeks after the 27th November (ish) inches had been sort of compacted into very hard ice, but never had a chance to thaw, and then more snow added on top of that. Exceptionally rare conditions, I would imagine.

    The location of that video is just north of where I join the M50 so I'd be through there every day.

    What happened here was that from 27th November for about a week there was snow every day and it accumulated (off the roads!) to 28cm; there was a slight thaw mid month when the road cover was completely cleared; them we had another ten days of snow in the run up to Christmas which had deposited a fresh 25cm by Christmas Eve.

    It certainly wasn't typical - being the coldest month in Ireland since records began!

    The lowest temp here was -12C in the calm of Christmas morning; up to then the onshore wind that brought the snow also kept night-time temps in the minus single figures.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,557 ✭✭✭✭ sryanbruen


    Worst Winters I've experienced at Grange (not Ireland or UK as a whole)

    1. 2013 / 14
    2. 1994 / 95
    3. 2006 / 07 - way too windy! it includes my windiest day ever!

    Best Winters I've experienced at Grange

    1. 2010 / 11
    2. 2005 / 06
    3. 1997 / 98 - it wasn't that windy overall especially compared to 2006 / 07
    4. 2009 / 10
    5. 2011 / 12

    I can't recall any other REALLY bad Winters though

    Weather and climate site - https://www.ukandirelandclimate.com/ (advised to view on PC, not optimised for mobile)

    Photography site - https://www.sryanbruenphoto.com/



  • Registered Users Posts: 14,307 ✭✭✭✭ nacho libre


    Ah nothing like reminiscing about past winters in August.

    Another intake of breath... winter 2010/11:D
    Without question the month of December 2010 was the best winter month I've ever experienced in Ireland. I doubt, much to my regret, we will ever see an Irish winter with both prolonged severe cold and snowy weather again in my lifetime(assuming it spans the average human life..) . We might well see big snow events, that last a few days, though.

    The storm of January 1990(?) stands out too, as it was the first major storm I can remember and it was unusual in that its duration was much longer than usual for a deep storm.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,033 ✭✭✭ Oneiric 3


    Another intake of breath... winter 2010/11:D
    Without question the month of December 2010 was the best winter month I've ever experienced in Ireland. I doubt, much to my regret, we will ever see an Irish winter with both prolonged severe cold and snowy weather again in my lifetime(assuming it's spans the average human life..) . We might well see big snow events, that last a few days, though.



    359079.png

    It is inevitable that we will see severe cold spells in the future. Shorter cold spells often produce more snow than spells that last for weeks or even months.

    New Moon



  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,995 Schadenfreudia


    Oneiric 3 wrote: »
    359079.png

    It is inevitable that we will see severe cold spells in the future. Shorter cold spells often produce more snow than spells that last for weeks or even months.

    When I was a young lad I'd draw charts like that as a fantasy exercise and keep the cold going for a whole imaginary month (always was odd as a hatter ;) ) - had to wait till 2010 to actually see it - never imagined I would.

    It was a wondermonth - the polar equivalent of summer '95. :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 313 ✭✭ gilly0512


    Well I cannot account for that - but the work I was doing at the time saw me travelling extensively across the country right through that month - there were snowploughs, absolute fact - I saw them all the time - they are attached to the front of the gritting trucks - which were also ubiquitous at the time (and still are whenever a frost is forecast).

    We cope as well as anywhere else with intermittent winter snow - so bring it on :)

    Still can't agree with you, maybe the snow ploughs came out after I went to work, but during those spells of heavy snowfall, anytime I got onto the M7 at 6:30am, you had thousands of cars driving very slowly in the inside lane towards Dublin, pretty much following the tracks made by other cars, with the outside lane covered in snow and nobody in it bar the odd lunatic. As regards your comment that we cope as well as anyone with intermittent snow, again I couldn't disagree more, we don't cope well at all with any kind of weather emergency, even heavy rainfall in this country which we should be well used to, still manages to cause mayhem.


  • Registered Users Posts: 981 ✭✭✭ Lucreto


    2010 I was learning to drive. Good experience driving in snowy and icy weather. Pity I have no practice since.

    Anyway I was in the instructors car stopped at some traffic lights and suddenly the car was pelted with snowball from both sides. Scared the crap out of me.

    I must have not been the first victim as the Guards must have been called and they were flashing the lights and making their way very slowly towards them.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,995 Schadenfreudia


    gilly2308 wrote: »
    Still can't agree with you, maybe the snow ploughs came out after I went to work, but during those spells of heavy snowfall, anytime I got onto the M7 at 6:30am, you had thousands of cars driving very slowly in the inside lane towards Dublin, pretty much following the tracks made by other cars, with the outside lane covered in snow and nobody in it bar the odd lunatic. As regards your comment that we cope as well as anyone with intermittent snow, again I couldn't disagree more, we don't cope well at all with any kind of weather emergency, even heavy rainfall in this country which we should be well used to, still manages to cause mayhem.

    Well, it is odd that the random clip posted by someone else featured a gritting truck and snow plough - which I recall were ubiquitous in Dun Laoghaire LA area and on the motorways.

    To say you spent hours on the M7 (including 4 hours on one occasion) and never saw even one is inexplicable.

    I also remember frequently using the outer lane to pass "crawlers" who persisted in doing 20kpm on well treated inner lanes - maybe I was one of those lunatics - I was far from alone :D ?

    Ironically - on one occasion immediately after a heavy shower (about 1 inch) on the M9 - due to pressure melting/refreezing from the traffic the inside lane was bald but icy and some cars ended up in the shoulder while the lunatics using the outside lane had good grip in the snow.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,033 ✭✭✭ Oneiric 3


    When I was a young lad I'd draw charts like that as a fantasy exercise and keep the cold going for a whole imaginary month (always was odd as a hatter ;) )


    Same as! Used to draw my fantasy charts too as a kid. So if that makes me as mad as a hatter, then there is a pair of us in it. :)

    New Moon



  • Registered Users Posts: 33,549 ✭✭✭✭ RobertKK


    gilly2308 wrote: »
    I couldn't disagree more, I live in Kildare and commute to Dublin on a daily basis, and commuting to and from Dublin was a nightmare during the heavy snowfalls of 2009 and 2010. I recall one horrendous commute from Newlands Cross to Kildare taking over four hours, and don't make me laugh going on about snow ploughs, I don't thing I ever saw one during the aforementioned Winters.

    Agree.
    Well I cannot account for that - but the work I was doing at the time saw me travelling extensively across the country right through that month - there were snowploughs, absolute fact - I saw them all the time - they are attached to the front of the gritting trucks - which were also ubiquitous at the time (and still are whenever a frost is forecast).

    We cope as well as anywhere else with intermittent winter snow - so bring it on :)

    People in rural Ireland were abandoned, the state basically didn't exist, given we had no police, no ambulance service unless the army was used and people had to fend for themselves, managed to get out once from my home in that month.
    Good neighbours with four wheel drives were essential.

    As for Oneiric 3's 'the stronger the better' for storms. Having your property destroyed, lots of matures falling down and having no power maybe for days and in some cases people killed. It is not better...
    For the February 12th storm last year here in Kilkenny, we had an orange warning for it, but when it hit Met Eireann changed to a red warning and to stay indoors, absolute miracle no one died, though a person did in the following days as they repaired falling poles.
    I'm sorry, but it had to be said.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,995 Schadenfreudia


    RobertKK wrote: »
    People in rural Ireland were abandoned, the state basically didn't exist, given we had no police, no ambulance service unless the army was used and people had to fend for themselves, managed to get out once from my home in that month.
    Good neighbours with four wheel drives were essential.

    One of the benefits of living in a city or town or village I guess. Here we have 1 person to pay for every metre of road - out in the country each person needs 500m of road (or whatever).

    Same with most infrastructure; same everywhere that gets intermittent winter snow.

    I was caught in a "blizzard" some miles from Lockerbie, Scotland one time. About two inches brought the whole countryside to a halt for two days. Same thing happened once going from Trier to Frankfurt Hahn (where you'd expect they'd cope given the relative frequency of snow).

    This is very different from claiming that there were no snowploughs anywhere - or that it was possible to spend hours on the M7 and not see a single one.

    The thing that struck me about last winter here was the huge cost incurred keeping all the roads clear of frost/ice that never came. Night after night they'd be sweeping up and down, using up salt and grit because frost was forecast only never to materialise.

    Not sure what the solution is because if they wait till the frost/snow arrives it's already too late.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,347 ✭✭✭✭ MJohnston


    Worth noting that I spent Christmas last year in the Baltimore–Washington metropolitan area, the most wealthy area in the US, and one of the most populous, and somewhere that frequently experiences heavy snowfalls in winter. It took them 3-4 days to even partially clear the roads where I was staying. In other words - most areas that don't permanently live under snowy/icy conditions need to have a triage system for dealing with them, and that will always target the cities first.


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,995 Schadenfreudia


    RobertKK wrote: »
    As for Oneiric 3's 'the stronger the better' for storms. Having your property destroyed, lots of matures falling down and having no power maybe for days and in some cases people killed. It is not better...
    For the February 12th storm last year here in Kilkenny, we had an orange warning for it, but when it hit Met Eireann changed to a red warning and to stay indoors, absolute miracle no one died, though a person did in the following days as they repaired falling poles.
    I'm sorry, but it had to be said.

    If a storm arrives I've as much chance of being hit by a falling tree as you or anyone else (probably more, because I never avoid travelling and usually head outside to enjoy the storm/lightening/snow).

    It's a cost/benefit calculation...the benefit of experiencing a raging storm against the cost of the damage and the very remote chance I'll be whacked by a tree.

    The storm wins every time!


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