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Garda Inspectorate report on Crime Investigation

  • 11-11-2014 10:03pm
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 8,156 ✭✭✭


    Following a detailed 2-year examination process, the Garda Inspectorate has produced a 500-page report on Crime Investigation, its most extensive to date, which was released by the Department of Justice today.

    Report and press release available here: http://www.gsinsp.ie/index.php?option=com_docman&Itemid=152
    “This Report should be viewed as a watershed opportunity,” said Garda Inspectorate Chief Inspector, Robert K.Olson. “We have made more than 200 significant recommendations to ensure that crime investigation in the Garda Síochána is in line with, and can exceed international best practice. Some of these recommendations have been made in previous Inspectorate reports, but haven’t been fully implemented, and are, as a result, even more urgent today. Our objective with this Report is to help make the Garda Síochána a better service – better for the public, for victims of crime, for the members themselves, and for the criminal justice system in Ireland.”
    The report identifies many deficiencies in systems and practices.

    "Many of these issues are not unique to the Garda Síochána,” said Chief Inspector Olson, “but they must be addressed if systems and practices are to be improved.”

    The report also identifies many areas of good practice in different garda divisions and in different parts of the country. These include a new Community Policing Model, a range of Crime Prevention Initiatives, cross-district Crime Operations, a new approach to integrated briefings, and a number of technological initiatives including a Garda Portal for Criminal Intelligence Officers. Such elements of good practice, however, while used in some divisions and in some units, are not consistent across the Garda Síochána.

    “Throughout the country, we found committed and dedicated people, and we found many elements of good practice,” said Chief Inspector Olson. “But we also found that these elements of good practice are not being shared or employed across the country.

    In any organisation of this size, you must ensure that good practice is consistently observed. That requires strong leadership, strong supervision, and strong governance.”

    Department of Justice press release here: http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Pages/PR14000315
    The Minister stated: “This report, undertaken as part of the Inspectorate’s work agreed by the Government, is a vital piece of work which is long overdue. I welcome the comprehensive recommendations on the need for upgraded technology, effective systems and changes to management practice. The Inspectorate’s analysis provides an important foundation stone for future development of a 21st century policing service for Ireland.”

    The Report states that “The Inspectorate was impressed by the hundreds of hard working and dedicated rank and file officers, reserves and support staff (they) met in every region, that were doing their best to get the job done, not withstanding inefficient processes, dated technology and poor management practices...”

    Commenting on this, the Minister stated “the report rightly acknowledges, as I do, the dedication and commitments of the men and women of An Garda Síochána who strive everyday to ensure the safety of our communities and the security of our state. Day-in-day-out, members of An Garda Síochána have many considerable successes in preventing and detecting crime, identifying and arresting offenders and keeping our communities safe.”

    “There is a pressing need to ensure that An Garda Síochána has access to effective, modern systems and processes; particularly where systems and processes have not kept pace with developments in broader society and other police services globally”.

    Given the repeated claims made about lack of Garda resources, it is remarkable how many references there are in the Inspectorate's report to a variety of ways in which time and resources are wasted.

    Another thing that struck me as rather worrying is the lack of of proper training and deployment of officers appointed as detectives.

    Apparently there are "approximately 700" untrained detectives, while a "large number" of trained detectives or gardaí appointed as detectives are deployed in non-investigative roles or with no connection with crime investigation.

    Serious crimes such as fraud, threats to life, aggravated burglary, rape and child sexual abuse are often investigated by front-line Gardai or by detectives with no specialist training.


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 145 ✭✭EveAlex


    Lets hope its all taken on board and our police service is improved


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,605 ✭✭✭yipeeeee


    Grim reading.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,605 ✭✭✭yipeeeee


    Grim reading.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,605 ✭✭✭yipeeeee


    Grim reading.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,605 ✭✭✭yipeeeee


    Grim reading.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,528 ✭✭✭kub


    I wonder will The Gardaí now have to appoint civilians from the private sector with suitable experience in human resources, technology etc? Will this be a change from the norm?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,333 ✭✭✭Zambia


    Maybe spend more money on training and less on creating 500 page reports on the fact there is none.

    Plus crimes are re classified all the time details become clearer.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,780 ✭✭✭carzony


    it seems there's so much things to fix within the garda they just don't know where to start.

    lack of technology, vehicles, staff, training, lack of proper weapons like tazer.



    on prime time it said ''scenes of crime officers only recieve 5 weeks of training and that's it. no re-training or refresher courses.. ''

    Also a massive amount of crime is usually down graded on pulse, 30% of reported crimes are not recorded properly.

    This really highlights serious issues and a huge investment is needed.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,333 ✭✭✭Zambia


    carzony wrote: »

    Also a massive amount of crime is usually down graded on pulse, 30% of reported crimes are not recorded properly.

    .

    Crimes are normally downgraded as they are identified as a lesser crime.
    Still investigated.


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    Zambia wrote: »
    Crimes are normally downgraded as they are identified as a lesser crime.
    Still investigated.

    From the UK this year.

    http://m.ft.com/cms/s/0/ba4e1c4e-d07c-11e3-9a81-00144feabdc0.html


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,624 ✭✭✭Little CuChulainn


    Nothing much in the report that hasn't been raised before. Seems like a politically motivated stunt to me. The Garda Inspectorate should be reporting on issues regularly, not saving up for big show stopping press releases. Much like GSOC, what should have been an independent body to improve the force now just looks like a political puppet.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,333 ✭✭✭Zambia



    Sorry I can't open that link


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    Zambia wrote: »
    Sorry I can't open that link

    Search for "met police crime stat probe"


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,333 ✭✭✭Zambia


    Search for "met police crime stat probe"

    You mean the met just "screening" out crime.

    In fairness they don't say what that is ? Is it just not even recording they even happened?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,499 ✭✭✭Capri


    The question has to be 'How does AGS compare with the Met / PSNI / NYPD / other Overseas forces ?'
    Are any better or worse than AGS and where does the blame lie - political interferance/patronage in promotions, incompetence at different levels , insufficient training, drain of experienced officers ( and reasons behind that drain ) ....... ??


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,624 ✭✭✭Little CuChulainn


    AGS protective gear was originally intended for another force who deemed it unsuitable. AGS computer system was designed 15 years ago for another force who deemed it unsuitable. AGS vehicles are family cars with lights and stripes and are unsuitable. AGS college has effectively been closed for over two years. Legislation granting powers to AGS has been consistently struck out with little replacement. Legislation protecting AGS employees is ineffective and often ignored by management and courts.

    All of those issues and the majority of those mentioned in the new report have been highlighted by the representative bodies for years. They have been ignored in favour of bull**** "scandals" like cancelled fines and non-existent bugging of GSOC because they were juicier stories. The people of Ireland have the police force they created themselves through neglect.


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,743 ✭✭✭✭Strumms


    The people of Ireland have the police force they created themselves through neglect.


    That's probably the biggest load of nonsense I have ever read on boards. Although I really thought I'd be saying that about something in after hours.

    The people of this country have no hand or play in how the Gardai operate. Also nice that you think that you can pass off the whole whistle blowing issue regarding penalty points etc as just a 'bull**** scandal'.

    I am sure there are issues with the support received by the force from successive governments however at last check I thought each member had a vote themselves when it came to electing representatives in this country. Your comments just go to show how in generally above and apart from everyday people the Gardai believe they are.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,624 ✭✭✭Little CuChulainn


    Strumms wrote: »
    That's probably the biggest load of nonsense I have ever read on boards. Although I really thought I'd be saying that about something in after hours.

    The people of this country have no hand or play in how the Gardai operate. Also nice that you think that you can pass off the whole whistle blowing issue regarding penalty points etc as just a 'bull**** scandal'.

    I am sure there are issues with the support received by the force from successive governments however at last check I thought each member had a vote themselves when it came to electing representatives in this country. Your comments just go to show how in generally above and apart from everyday people the Gardai believe they are.

    Nobodies suggesting the fixed charge penalty system didn't need fixing but it wasn't a scandal deserving of the level of coverage it got, especially when compared to some of the real issues in the justice system like the complete disconnect between AGS, the prison service and the courts.

    The people do have a part to play by their response to stories. A completely unsubstantiated story about GSOC being bugged comes out and everyone loses their mind. A story comes out stating that 8% of the force are injured every year and no outrage follows. The people chose what issues were addressed. They now have a fixed charge penalty system that works so well that people have to go to court for a simple error in the ticket where previously it could be fixed and reissued. Yet at the same time we have a system were firearms certifications are being withdrawn to save the cost of bullets in the training range.

    You can call Gardaí disconnected if you want and call my post nonsense. Personally I just consider you ignorant of the reality in the justice system.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,966 ✭✭✭Paulzx


    Strumms wrote: »
    That's probably the biggest load of nonsense I have ever read on boards. Although I really thought I'd be saying that about something in after hours.

    The people of this country have no hand or play in how the Gardai operate. Also nice that you think that you can pass off the whole whistle blowing issue regarding penalty points etc as just a 'bull**** scandal'.

    I am sure there are issues with the support received by the force from successive governments however at last check I thought each member had a vote themselves when it came to electing representatives in this country. Your comments just go to show how in generally above and apart from everyday people the Gardai believe they are.

    You've completely contradicted yourself in this post. You claim that each garda member has a vote so has a say yet you reckon all the other voters (of which there multiples of the 12000 gardai ) have no hand or part in how the Gardai operate. One of the biggest changes in our justice system, the Criminal Assest Bureau legislation was enacted due to public pressure on politicians after the Veronica Guerin murder. This directly affected how the gardai operated so the people of this country do have a direct say in how the gardai operate. The people elect the politicians and put the pressure on them to go in the direction they want

    Most Gardai i've ever met certainly don't consider themsleves "above and apart from everyday people". Funnily enough they are everyday people. Two arms, two legs a mortgage and kids to feed.....sounds pretty everyday to me.

    The report has shown up huge shortcomings. Most of these come as no surprise to the majority of gardai. They've being saying the same thing for years. Unless the population as a whole puts pressure on the politicians this report will just fade away. The guard on the street has no say in it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,743 ✭✭✭✭Strumms


    The people of this country have very little say at all as to what happens in this country, for the most part we are run roughshod over by government after government with no genuine alternative. This current crowd are only the tip of the iceberg. For the most part a democracy in name only.

    So to claim that the public get "the police force they created themselves through neglect". Your words not mine there is quite laughable.

    I don't think we have ever sat down to discuss my general aptitude for the criminal justice system at any length so to accuse me of being ignorant of it is a little south of reality but by all means tow the party line... Best defense attack and all that.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,160 ✭✭✭TheNog


    Nothing in the report is news. The problems identified in the report has been said by members for years. Actually the majority of problems shown in the report was offered up by members themselves.

    Every person in AGS from Garda to Commissioner knows what is wrong the job but there was never any political will to assist in change.

    I'm glad Detectives have been outed. God some of them are the most frustrating and useless people. Not all of them but some of them.

    Policing on the cheap and this is the result


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,333 ✭✭✭Zambia


    Let's not forget even when ags do secure conviction the judiciary are the ones handing out sentence.

    There's no point kicking up a stink lower level crimes don't get solved when lower level crimes don't get a sentence that reflects the victims loss


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,156 ✭✭✭Iwannahurl


    TheNog wrote: »
    Nothing in the report is news. The problems identified in the report has been said by members for years. Actually the majority of problems shown in the report was offered up by members themselves.

    Every person in AGS from Garda to Commissioner knows what is wrong the job but there was never any political will to assist in change.

    I'm glad Detectives have been outed. God some of them are the most frustrating and useless people. Not all of them but some of them.

    Policing on the cheap and this is the result


    How does "policing on the cheap" explain the likes of this:
    First Steps at a Crime Scene and Incident Recording
    The Guerin Report highlighted issues in relation to gathering evidence at a crime scene and inaccurate entries on PULSE including, delays in retrieving evidence, no entries in Garda note books, missing reports, inaccurate and incorrect entries on PULSE, alternation to the narrative on PULSE.

    Inspectorate found similar issues and has made recommendations to address each of these points made including: the removal of the ability to change the narrative on PULSE; introduction of a crime investigation and case management system and recommendations to improve the recording of calls through the introduction of a national electronic recording system.

    Crime Investigation
    The Guerin Report highlighted poor standards in crime investigation including: delays in taking statements; delays in completion of investigations; absence of note book entries; flaws in the maintenance of the chain of evidence; late summonses and issues with identification parade management and interviewing.

    Inspectorate found similar issues and has made recommendations to address each of these points raised including; the adoption of minimum standards of investigation; the introduction of dedicated investigative units and enhanced technology to allow for crime investigations to be accurately recorded and cases tracked through an electronic case management system.

    Supervision
    The Guerin Report highlighted issues in respect of senior garda visibility including: front-line supervision; performance monitoring; abstractions; frequency of turnover of superintendents; absence of inspectors and failure to comply with directions from superior officers went without action.

    Inspectorate found similar issues and has made recommendations to address each of these points raised including: enhanced supervision for call handing, incident recording, crime management, crime investigation and detections; a new divisional structure for enhanced supervision; clear roles of responsibility for supervisors and increased front-line supervision to ensure crime is effectively investigated.

    AGS may be decades behind in terms of modern data recording and case management methods, but that doesn't stop an individual officer from writing something down in their notebook.

    Michael Finucane, Chair of the Law Society's Human Rights Committee, was on RTE Radio 1 yesterday, and he was referring to cases where necessary investigation, such as reviewing hours of CCTV footage, was not done because the officers involved did not want to do such tedious work. This was in the context of the chronic lack of supervision, and the way in which sloppy work practices become normalised as a result. That looks more like a cultural issue ("the way we do things around here") rather than a resources issue.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,082 ✭✭✭bravestar


    Iwannahurl wrote: »
    How does "policing on the cheap" explain the likes of this:



    AGS may be decades behind in terms of modern data recording and case management methods, but that doesn't stop an individual officer from writing something down in their notebook.

    Michael Finucane, Chair of the Law Society's Human Rights Committee, was on RTE Radio 1 yesterday, and he was referring to cases where necessary investigation, such as reviewing hours of CCTV footage, was not done because the officers involved did not want to do such tedious work. This was in the context of the chronic lack of supervision, and the way in which sloppy work practices become normalised as a result. That looks more like a cultural issue ("the way we do things around here") rather than a resources issue.

    It's easy to see things in black and white when you only know one side of a story.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,156 ✭✭✭Iwannahurl


    bravestar wrote: »
    It's easy to see things in black and white when you only know one side of a story.


    In what way is the story one-sided?


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    Iwannahurl wrote: »

    Michael Finucane, Chair of the Law Society's Human Rights Committee, was on RTE Radio 1 yesterday, and he was referring to cases where necessary investigation, such as reviewing hours of CCTV footage, was not done because the officers involved did not want to do such tedious work.

    I would put the real reason here at being unable to get the time to actually view hours of CCTV and actually find a machine capable of playing back the footage.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,966 ✭✭✭Paulzx


    foreign wrote: »
    I would put the real reason here at being unable to get the time to actually view hours of CCTV and actually find a machine capable of playing back the footage.

    You should bring it home and view it on your own time and on your own machine.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,624 ✭✭✭Little CuChulainn


    Iwannahurl wrote: »
    How does "policing on the cheap" explain the likes of this:

    Massive workload. If a Garda was to do things the way Guerin and the Inspectorate wants them done you would be looking at 6 to 7 calls answered per shift. In busy places like Tallaght you'd be lucky to get away with 7 calls an hour on the board so many would go unanswered. And that's just for preliminary investigation. If you want the Garda to do follow up investigation, arrest and question a suspect, prepare a file and prosecute the case then that's a lot more time.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,082 ✭✭✭bravestar


    Iwannahurl wrote: »
    In what way is the story one-sided?

    Was there a serving member on this Rte show explaining why they might have difficulty viewing cctv for example? No? didnt think so.

    Any member knows well why things are the way they are, but are not allowed to talk about it and until they are given a voice, nothing will change.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,333 ✭✭✭Zambia


    It's fair to say tv gives people the impression cops work on one case at a time. Not to mention the whole endless amounts of time devoted to single cases.

    The reality I am sure is different.


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