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Removing a galvanised water tank from the attic

  • 21-01-2014 10:53pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 11,413 ✭✭✭✭ josip


    The problem is that the tank is too big for the hatch and I don't want to start cutting the hatch.
    Nor do I want to use an angle grinder in such an enclosed tinder dry space.
    I thought to use some acid (muriatic/HCl?) to cut it in half length-wise by repeatedly applying a weak solution along it.
    I have lots of time and don't mind if it takes years and multiple applications

    Am I mad?


«1

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,944 ✭✭✭ Cerco


    Buy a reciprocating saw, on sale in Lidl this week. They come with a blade for cutting metal. Buy a pair of goggles and heavy gloves. Good luck!


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,263 ✭✭✭ DublinDilbert


    Acid? someone was watching breaking bad over Christmas!

    Just get a reciprocating saw with a decent blade and it will cut it no problem. Gloves are a must as it will be razor sharp. If you haven't got a reciprocating saw lidl/aldi sell them for nothing. Or even a Jig saw with a steel blade will do it. I've cut up 3 or 4 of these in the last few years with my aldi saw, not a bother to it.

    It will be very dusty/noisy, so mask/gloves/goggles etc.. but should only take a minute or two.


  • Registered Users Posts: 336 ✭✭ CBYR1983


    Would the cutting disk on an angle grinder do it? Is there a risk of fire though? I had the same issue, massive disused metal tank in attic, just left it in the end. I have since acquired an angle grinder though :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,282 ✭✭✭ phelixoflaherty


    Push it over into a corner and leave it there.

    Turn it on its side as storage.

    It's not like you are going to see it every day.

    Fugget about it


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,721 ✭✭✭ Sir Arthur Daley


    The safest way now to cut up that tank is to get a portable compressor and an air hacksaw, it will do just to cut down the 4 corners and fold it in on its self and it should fit diagonally down the trap.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 11,413 ✭✭✭✭ josip


    CBYR1983 wrote: »
    Would the cutting disk on an angle grinder do it? Is there a risk of fire though? I had the same issue, massive disused metal tank in attic, just left it in the end. I have since acquired an angle grinder though :)

    Anyone I've asked who should know these things say "under no circumstances go at it with an angle grinder"


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,721 ✭✭✭ Sir Arthur Daley


    josip wrote: »
    Anyone I've asked who should know these things say "under no circumstances go at it with an angle grinder"
    That old water tank has not much strength in it, a large metal work shears would cut it i imagine too, its like a giant scissors.


  • Registered Users Posts: 66 ✭✭✭ Guest0000


    A decent jigsaw, with a good metal blade or two, would be by far the safest way to cut it down..goggles and gloves a must.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 322 ✭✭ jpb14


    josip wrote: »
    The problem is that the tank is too big for the hatch and I don't want to start cutting the hatch.
    Nor do I want to use an angle grinder in such an enclosed tinder dry space.
    I thought to use some acid (muriatic/HCl?) to cut it in half length-wise by repeatedly applying a weak solution along it.
    I have lots of time and don't mind if it takes years and multiple applications

    Am I mad?

    Any way at all thatyou can get it out in 1 piece.These are worth a few quid on done deal and buy and sell as they make for nice garden features and for making small wildlife ponds.Youd sell it for 40 euro no problem.If you have to cut it then a sabre saw or jigsaw and a metal blade will be easiest and safest way to remove.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,688 ✭✭✭ dodzy


    jpb14 wrote: »
    Any way at all thatyou can get it out in 1 piece.These are worth a few quid on done deal and buy and sell as they make for nice garden features and for making small wildlife ponds.Youd sell it for 40 euro no problem.If you have to cut it then a sabre saw or jigsaw and a metal blade will be easiest and safest way to remove.
    OP Already says its not possible to take down through opening in one piece.

    And I'm still laughing at the acid and shears suggestions :D


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,721 ✭✭✭ Sir Arthur Daley


    dodzy wrote: »
    OP Already says its not possible to take down through opening in one piece.

    And I'm still laughing at the acid and shears suggestions :D
    Care to tell us what's so funny about the shears suggestion?


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 322 ✭✭ jpb14


    dodzy wrote: »
    OP Already says its not possible to take down through opening in one piece.

    And I'm still laughing at the acid and shears suggestions :D


    Well if there is absolutely no way that the OP cannot get it out in one piece then my 2nd suggestion is the easiest and safest way then.Cut with sabre saw or jig saw and metal blade.
    We got our old galvied water tank out of the attic via the velux window and then sold it for 45 quid on donedeal.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,688 ✭✭✭ dodzy


    WikiHow wrote: »
    Care to tell us what's so funny about the shears suggestion?
    It may not be the strongest material on the planet, but there ain't no way you are going to get through it with device you suggested. Not a chance. Sabre saw with appropriate blade as mentioned by others is the easiest way in this situation.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,721 ✭✭✭ Sir Arthur Daley


    dodzy wrote: »
    It may not be the strongest material on the planet, but there ain't no way you are going to get through it with device you suggested. Not a chance. Sabre saw with appropriate blade as mentioned by others is the easiest way in this situation.
    What thickness steel do you think a water tank is?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,196 ✭✭✭ jack of all


    A regular "tin snips" would struggle with one of those old water tanks, once you'd get 2 or 3" into the cut I think you'd give up! Sabre saw would be the easiest I'd say.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,008 scudo2


    WikiHow wrote: »
    Care to tell us what's so funny about the shears suggestion?

    Acid !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! OMG


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,137 ✭✭✭ rje66


    josip wrote: »
    The problem is that the tank is too big for the hatch and I don't want to start cutting the hatch.
    Nor do I want to use an angle grinder in such an enclosed tinder dry space.
    I thought to use some acid (muriatic/HCl?) to cut it in half length-wise by repeatedly applying a weak solution along it.
    I have lots of time and don't mind if it takes years and multiple applications

    Am I mad?

    Why make a problem when there isn't one. As one post suggested just leave it there.
    Simple.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,404 ✭✭✭ corkgsxr


    Into the corner and forget. If you need that much space you need to clean out your attic


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,492 ✭✭✭ roy rodgers


    as a plumber i always say "well it been there for the last 40 years so it can say there for another 40 year" as far as im concerned


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,793 ✭✭✭ whizbang


    Its the €40 i'm laughing at.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 11,413 ✭✭✭✭ josip


    corkgsxr wrote: »
    Into the corner and forget. If you need that much space you need to clean out your attic

    Not an option unfortunately. There are 5 tanks up there all approaching their end of life and needing replacing. It's an apartment block attic space and there's only room to store 2 of them.

    I only suggested acid because a builder firend had said it's always a problem and not to cut them up. He was probably only thinking of an angle grinder.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,404 ✭✭✭ corkgsxr


    josip wrote: »
    Not an option unfortunately. There are 5 tanks up there all approaching their end of life and needing replacing. It's an apartment block attic space and there's only room to store 2 of them.

    I only suggested acid because a builder firend had said it's always a problem and not to cut them up. He was probably only thinking of an angle grinder.

    Sabre saw so. Low dust. No sparks


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 322 ✭✭ jpb14


    whizbang wrote: »
    Its the €40 i'm laughing at.

    45 euro actually.:D
    Ones persons rubbish is another persons gold.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 322 ✭✭ jpb14


    josip wrote: »
    Not an option unfortunately. There are 5 tanks up there all approaching their end of life and needing replacing. It's an apartment block attic space and there's only room to store 2 of them.

    I only suggested acid because a builder firend had said it's always a problem and not to cut them up. He was probably only thinking of an angle grinder.

    A sabre saw and metal blade is the way forward so.You will fly through it in no time at all.Dont forget your PPE when using the sabre saw.Happy cutting.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,688 ✭✭✭ dodzy


    WikiHow wrote: »
    What thickness steel do you think a water tank is?
    Don't have one to measure. I swapped out one in my fathers house several years back. Left it up there as no sabre saw at the time. Offered to cut it up later but plenty of room there so old man wasnt pushed. And I'm telling you, there is no way on this earth you'd get thru it with a snips.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,413 ✭✭✭✭ josip


    dodzy wrote: »
    And I'm telling you, there is no way on this earth you'd get thru it with a snips.

    But what if you'd corroded a nice line over a few months with 5M Hydrochloric acid? :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,404 ✭✭✭ corkgsxr


    At a guess there about 1.2mm galvanized.

    Much to heavy for a snipps


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,608 ✭✭✭ gctest50


    corkgsxr wrote: »
    At a guess there about 1.2mm galvanized.

    Much to heavy for a snipps

    Hire a nibbler ?

    http://www.erento.co.uk/hire/tools-equipment/cutting-grinding/router-cutter/1730938757.html


    .


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,404 ✭✭✭ corkgsxr


    gctest50 wrote: »

    I don't think they can deal with folded edges. Only flat sheet


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,683 ✭✭✭ Carpenter


    Years ago we used a car jack and blocks of wood to break the corner joints and it worked perfect .


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