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The "What is this English word/phrase in Irish" thread

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  • Registered Users Posts: 941 ✭✭✭An gal gréine


    Le dreach stuama....is said in Donegal for straight-faced.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,707 ✭✭✭Worztron


    Hi. What is the Irish for for Ken or Kenneth? Cheers.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 941 ✭✭✭An gal gréine


    Cionaoth in Irish Gaelic.
    Coinneach in Scottish Gaelic.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,707 ✭✭✭Worztron


    An gal gre wrote: »
    Cionaoth in Irish Gaelic.
    Coinneach in Scottish Gaelic.

    Cheers AGG.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,621 ✭✭✭flexcon


    Glorious people.

    Could any of you fine folk translate this to Irish? It will be a tattoo for a close friend.

    "Keep her safe"

    Thank you in advanced!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 941 ✭✭✭An gal gréine


    Coinnigh sábháilte í.

    A less literal way would be Go mbeidh sí slán.

    Others may have different ways of expressing it.


  • Administrators, Entertainment Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 18,724 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭hullaballoo


    It's "a choinneáil í sabháilte" imo. It's supposed to be continuous I presume so that would be it.

    Having said that, the phrase is a turn-of-phrase in (Hiberno-)English so there may be a translation for the sentiment rather than the phrase.


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,892 Mod ✭✭✭✭Insect Overlord


    I must say I prefer An Gal Gréine's suggestion.

    The latter looks more like "that kept her safe" to me.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,621 ✭✭✭flexcon


    Coinnigh sábháilte í.

    A less literal way would be Go mbeidh sí slán.

    Others may have different ways of expressing it.
    It's "a choinneáil í sabháilte" imo. It's supposed to be continuous I presume so that would be it.

    Having said that, the phrase is a turn-of-phrase in (Hiberno-)English so there may be a translation for the sentiment rather than the phrase.
    I must say I prefer An Gal Gréine's suggestion.

    The latter looks more like "that kept her safe" to me.

    That's great guys thanks, very much appreciate it!


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,989 ✭✭✭✭Kintarō Hattori


    I'm afraid I can't spell this correctly but can anyone help me with the correct spelling and meaning of a word called 'Crauntahaun' ..... I think it may be from Donegal.


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  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,892 Mod ✭✭✭✭Insect Overlord


    I don't recognize it. What was the context you heard it in? That might help narrow the search.


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,892 Mod ✭✭✭✭Insect Overlord


    There's one match for "crantachán" on the Internet, from a folklore survey in 1989 in Cluain Eamhain (Roscommon).

    It is translated as "a wretch" but it's also noted that the word doesn't appear in the dictionary.

    http://pobal.drum.ie/about/townlands/clonown/history/irish-language

    There's a fine list of insults there with it. :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,989 ✭✭✭✭Kintarō Hattori


    I believe it's a mild insult, like calling someone a fecker, blaggard etc.


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,892 Mod ✭✭✭✭Insect Overlord


    I believe it's a mild insult, like calling someone a fecker, blaggard etc.

    Looks like the one I posted above, in that case. "Crantachán". I'll have to add that one to my arsenal. :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,707 ✭✭✭Worztron


    Hi. Today, I noticed on a Bus Eireann stop - the words 's t a d c h' (not certain of spelling and since Irish words don't appear properly for me - I included an image) that might mean 'stop code'. Can anyone verify this? Thanks guys.


    477098.png

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 18 Snag Darach


    Worztron wrote: »
    Hi. Today, I noticed on a Bus Eireann stop - the words 's t a d c h' (not certain of spelling and since Irish words don't appear properly for me - I included an image) that might mean 'stop code'. Can anyone verify this? Thanks guys.


    477098.png

    I've never used it myself but it's probably the code for the bus-stop when you're texting the bus to pick you up.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,707 ✭✭✭Worztron


    I've never used it myself but it's probably the code for the bus-stop when you're texting the bus to pick you up.

    Hi Snag Darach. I was in the bus at a bus stop so may not have seen it properly. Is the word in Irish that I posted spelt correctly and does it match the English, 'stop code'? Also - what do you mean by 'texting the bus to pick you up'?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,707 ✭✭✭Worztron


    Would this be more accurate? 'ctad' -- Propery spelling shown here: https://www.wordhippo.com/what-is/dynamic-translation/4f532d350c771c87eb3d5db4827acd83431d5f44.html

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,892 Mod ✭✭✭✭Insect Overlord


    "Stadchód" would be a compound word. You'd recognise it from the séimhiú in the "cód" part of the term.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,707 ✭✭✭Worztron


    "Stadchód" would be a compound word. You'd recognise it from the séimhiú in the "cód" part of the term.

    Hi IO. Would it be a correct translation of 'stop code'?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,707 ✭✭✭Worztron


    Can someone please confirm?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,892 Mod ✭✭✭✭Insect Overlord


    Worztron wrote: »
    Hi IO. Would it be a correct translation of 'stop code'?
    Worztron wrote: »
    Can someone please confirm?

    Yes, stadchód would be a perfect translation for "stop-code". :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,707 ✭✭✭Worztron


    Yes, stadchód would be a perfect translation for "stop-code". :)

    Cheers IO.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,707 ✭✭✭Worztron


    Hi.

    Are both of these correct?
    • I'm in trouble. - T dtriobl
    • I'm in trouble. - T i dtriobl
    If the Irish words are not showing properly - I've also attached an image:
    487331.png

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 941 ✭✭✭An gal gréine


    Yes, they are.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,707 ✭✭✭Worztron


    Yes, they are.

    Cheers, AGG. I appreciate it. :)

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,862 ✭✭✭mikhail


    Cad é and Gaelige ar fádh "Brexit"? "Sasamach"? :)


  • Administrators, Entertainment Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 18,724 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭hullaballoo


    Go hiontach ar fád! :D


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,892 Mod ✭✭✭✭Insect Overlord


    mikhail wrote: »
    Cad é and Gaelige ar fádh "Brexit"? "Sasamach"? :)

    "Breatimeacht" is the one used most often in the news and media, but "Sasamach" would be well understood by most speakers as well. "Bréalú" was suggested at one stage.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,707 ✭✭✭Worztron


    Hi.

    Are these phrases accurate?
    • cork historic centre - cearcla chorca*]kindness diary - dialann cineais
    • Volunteer Cork - Ionad d'Obair Dheonach, Corcaigh

    Also - is 'thpie' an Irish word? Or just the name of a company in Cork City?

    The Irish words don't show properly after posting so I've attached a screenshot.


    497080.png

    Bhu

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



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