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Moving To/Living In London Megathread - ALL QUESTIONS TO GO HERE

  • 16-11-2010 11:18pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 2,759 ✭✭✭ dmcg90


    Mod note: This thread includes an archive of the Moving To London FAQ discussions from the last 2 years, as well as current queries. Any and all questions relating to moving to London should be posted here. If you're looking for specific information, consult the FAQ or use the Search Tool.

    Any new threads opened with questions about moving to London will be merged here.


    Hi, I'm a 20 year old student currently in NUIG. I'm planning on moving over to London in May/June next year. I however have zero clue what I need/have to do.

    I would like to know:
    Do I need to get permission to live there, visa etc?
    What do I need to work there?
    What do I need in terms of having a doctor over there?
    What kind of rents will I be facing (preferably Zone 2 - South London).

    I'm looking into starting internships in Marketing next summer, these aren't very well paid/not paid at all. Would this complicate my situation?

    I basically know nothing about what I need to do to make moving over there a reality come May/June.

    Any help is massively appreciated.


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,385 ✭✭✭ Irish Halo


    dmcg90 wrote: »
    Do I need to get permission to live there, visa etc?
    Are you Irish? Then no.
    dmcg90 wrote: »
    What do I need to work there?
    A job? A bit of a vgaue question but assume you are asking about social security number? Called a national insurance number and easy to get.
    dmcg90 wrote: »
    What do I need in terms of having a doctor over there?
    Register at the local GP surgery
    dmcg90 wrote: »
    What kind of rents will I be facing (preferably Zone 2 - South London).
    Depends, I rented a three double bed flat for £1300 a month in Stockwell in 2009, love south London (not Clapham)
    dmcg90 wrote: »
    I'm looking into starting internships in Marketing next summer, these aren't very well paid/not paid at all. Would this complicate my situation?
    Except that London is expensive, no, but you can live cheaply.

    As an Irish citizen you have a right to live in the UK and vote in all elections. So moving to London is only slightly more complicated than moving from Galway to Dublin


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,759 ✭✭✭ dmcg90


    Irish Halo wrote: »
    Are you Irish? Then no.

    A job? A bit of a vgaue question but assume you are asking about social security number? Called a national insurance number and easy to get.

    Register at the local GP surgery

    Depends, I rented a three double bed flat for £1300 a month in Stockwell in 2009, love south London (not Clapham)
    Except that London is expensive, no, but you can live cheaply.

    As an Irish citizen you have a right to live in the UK and vote in all elections. So moving to London is only slightly more complicated than moving from Galway to Dublin


    Phew, good to know. I'm an Irish citizen.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,385 ✭✭✭ Irish Halo


    Also to get a bank account (IIRC) you will need three months of bank statements showing your UK address the easiest way to do this is once you have have an address (i.e. your new flat or a friends if you know someone in London) just change the address on your Irish account to the UK one, once that is done request the three months of statements and voilà you have three months of bank statements with a UK address.

    Renting your first flat can be awkward with regards guarantees e.g. getting your folks to guarantee the rent is pretty much impossible (assuming they are in Ireland and not the UK) but can usually be overcome somehow.

    You first 2/3 months will not be cheap so save as much as you can before you come over, this will stand you in good stead when you land and have no money worries.

    I moved over almost 5 years ago and have no regrets, I lived in south London too for 4 of those years so you can PM me if you have any questions regarding exact areas/transport connections or anything else. One hint disregard most people's attitude to "bad" areas of south London, obviously there are some no-go areas (true for anywhere in London) but things like "Brixton is dangerous" etc are way too broad to be taken seriously.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,369 ✭✭✭ sitstill


    You should try to organise your bank account and National Insurance Number (same as PPS Number) before you go because it totally simplifies things.

    I did both of these things in Newry, opening an account with Bank of Ireland up there, as it's a UK account it works in London and you can lodge and withdraw money in any Post Office in the UK if you need to.

    If you ring the Newry Benefits Office on 048 3026 5522 and explain that you are moving to the UK, they will invite you to an interview and assign you a NI number. This will make starting a job much easier.

    I never registered with a GP in London because there are NHS Walk in Centres like this one:

    http://www.westminster-pct.nhs.uk/English/lhs/walk-in centre/Pages/SohoNHSWalkinCentre.aspx

    which are handy, but if you feel you'd need a GP, I'd say its easy enough to register. Its also free over there.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 12 ✭✭✭ Creole


    Hi, not going to add too much to the brill advice youve already been given here..just wondered what 'Marketing' field you are in? ie if its Arts Marketing, then go to Arts Council of England website and register for 'artsjobs mailing lists. They will then send you daily emails, lots of paid marketing jobs on there and a good few internships, too..although I am against internships as I believe its using students as cheap labour but still, if for a short time I guess its ok! even if 'arts' isnt what youre into, at least its an inroad and can lead to something else.

    South London is fine, its like anywhere, just keep your wits about you dont wander off anywhere you think is dubious looking, and you'll be safe. The only areas I'd say not to live in re. south London are Peckham (SE15), and New Cross (SE14) where it borders Peckham, it can be rough around there, as can parts of Bermondsey (SE16), and Kennington (SE11). I wouldnt live in Peckham if you paid me, too much trouble around there. Most other areas fine, Brixton/Clapham is good, I really love the vibe in those areas..lots of student bars/nightlife, if thats your thing.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,523 ✭✭✭ Marcusm


    I moved to London 14 years ago but have experience with people moving over the lad 2 years or so as well.

    Getting an NI number is really easy, they'll assign a temporary one at first and then you'll be issued with a card with the permanent one. Never heard about the Newry route before. In my experience, it's fairly easy to get an appointment in London which you can arrange once you know where you're going to be staying for the first couple of days.

    Opening a bank account in the UK should be easy once you have an Irish account. The main babka will each operate a new to the UK type account (HSBC one is called Passport) which is available to people who can show they have previously had an account in another suitable country like Ireland. You can check it out on each bank's website. The charges for these accounts rarely exceed £6 per month and most other banking services are free. When I moved first I used AIB but they subsequently closed a lot of their branches. Likewise Bank of Ireland has a smaller footprint now than a few years ago. You may not expect to use your branch much but it's useful if you're looking to borrow money!

    I have lived and/or worked in South London all the time I've been in London. For me South London extends as far as Croydon and while others may scoff that can be a good place to start off in to transition to London. It's a major train hub with routes into Victoria, Blackfriars, The City, King's Cross, London Bridge and Charing Cross. If you're not used to a train commute, this can give you a 15 minute express train service to a London terminus without changing. South London is better served by overground trains and buses than by tubes.

    Otherwise, if you get a job/position before you head over, I'd choose where to live based on an easy commute. There is nothing more dispiriting than starting in a new city than a painful difficult commute, you'll be doing it twice a day.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 12 ✭✭✭ Creole


    True enough, Croydon is a nice area, away from the inner hustle & bustle, with good rail, tram and bus links. Brixton has tube + rail, Clapham has 3 tube stations + rail, so all these areas are fine.

    @Marcusm can I ask, if from UK travelling to Ireland do you know if it works the same way as in being easy to open a bank account, say a 'new to Ireland' account? Im spending 9 months in Ireland next year and I hear before anyone can get a PPS number, proof of permanent Irish address is needed. But, I wanted to get PPS immediately is possible, and I'll be in a hotel for 1st 2 weeks..


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 16,339 tman


    Creole wrote: »
    South London is fine, its like anywhere, just keep your wits about you dont wander off anywhere you think is dubious looking, and you'll be safe. The only areas I'd say not to live in re. south London are Peckham (SE15), and New Cross (SE14) where it borders Peckham, it can be rough around there, as can parts of Bermondsey (SE16), and Kennington (SE11). I wouldnt live in Peckham if you paid me, too much trouble around there. Most other areas fine, Brixton/Clapham is good, I really love the vibe in those areas..lots of student bars/nightlife, if thats your thing.

    Peckham itself is quite rough, but Camberwell is quite nice (lived halfway between the two for a year and didn't have a spot of trouble!)
    The major downside to that kind of area is that you'll be a bit of a trek from a tube station (but then again, if you want to live cheaply you'll most likely want to stick to busses anyway!)
    Brixton on the other hand is dodgy as ****, never felt safe there at night! If you get offered skunk within 2 seconds of walking out of a tube station, you can usually hazzard a guess that police presence isn't too great in that area!

    Most of the advice so far is spot on, but just be sure to keep transport in mind when choosing somewhere to live... If you choose somewhere with only 1 infrequent bus route nearby it'll end up doing your head in! (I learnt from that mistake!)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,385 ✭✭✭ Irish Halo


    Creole wrote: »
    it can be rough around there, as can parts of Kennington (SE11).
    I live in Kennington and have no problems even the end near Elephant and Castle, also I'm a minute walk from the tube station :D
    tman wrote: »
    Brixton on the other hand is dodgy as ****, never felt safe there at night! If you get offered skunk within 2 seconds of walking out of a tube station, you can usually hazzard a guess that police presence isn't too great in that area!
    This is nonsense, police presence is Brixton is fine, the reason their are "drug" dealers everywhere is, shockingly, they aren't dealing drugs outside the station, it's just herbs (one of my ex-flatmates fell for this twice :rolleyes:). If the police pick them up they get nothing because there is nothing to get. I have literally wandered through Brixton at all times of the day and night including between midnight and 6am, and unless you are completely drunk, flashing around money/expensive tech and heading down one of the alleyways that infest any modern city (and can be found all over London too) you will be fine.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,421 bluedolphin


    As someone living in a flat just off Rye Lane in Peckham since September, I'd like to point out a few things:

    1. It's not that bad. Really.

    2. Rents are a lot cheaper around here and you get a lot more for your pound than other areas because most people reject the area based on its reputation. But for the price you pay here, from Peckham Rye station it's only ten mins to London Bridge, 15 to Victoria and Mon-Friday there are also direct connections to Thameslink/Farringdon/King's X/Kentish Town in 30 mins, which is a pretty good deal for London. What's more, my monthly train travel card costs £55...versus...what for a TFL ticket!? Trains can get you pretty much anywhere and the odd time (e.g. at night) I take a bus. Bus connections are pretty good around here too. Not being on the Tube isn't necessarily a bad thing...just sayin'!

    Being from Limerick, I understand the stigma that a lot of people associate with certain areas. And for both Peckham and Limerick, as long as you keep your wits about you, don't get caught up with local gangs and drugs, it's as safe as anywhere else. In fact, because of its name, you don't get lured into a sense of false security like you could do elsewhere in a "nice" area.

    Don't rule out living in Peckham just because; if you see a good deal, have a look, and use your common sense to judge whether you feel safe or not.

    Oh, and I'm female as well and living with one other female who, incidentally, has lived in Peckham for 18months now. And somehow survived. :rolleyes:


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 12 ✭✭✭ Creole


    ah well I dont smoke skunk but, am not worried about being offered it. Its standard really, just say no and walk on by. Brixon is an ok area lots of clubs/bars around so its always busy..like anywhere just dont wander off down a lonely looking alleyway looking rich and lost!

    Being offered skunk is better than having money grabbed out of your hand at NatWest cashpoint, or having your bag snatched out of your hand (seen this with my own eyes at 4pm-ish in Peckham). A friend of mine had Mace sprayed in his eyes last year so they could snatch his gold chain, not as if it was a long chain or anything..again this was in the afternoon. Its worse at night...if anyone knows Peckham these incidents happened on main road, within a few metres of the library and Wetherspoons pub. Hardly a 'lonely' area its always full of people, but its Peckham, so hey.. Even worse approaching from other direction opp the JobCentre where all those 'restaurants' are, being offered cocaine, skunk, heroine they have the lines off pat. That could be intimidating for some.

    I just couldnt take living there, sorry, and I am south London born and bred and well able to take care of myself, so I dont have general fear or misconception of it..but there are just some places you dont want to be in and for me, main Peckham is 1 of them. Couldnt care less about being lucky enough not to be mugged, just dont want it to be me when the unlucky time comes around. Better off up the road in Camberwell.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,523 ✭✭✭ Marcusm


    Creole wrote: »
    True enough, Croydon is a nice area, away from the inner hustle & bustle, with good rail, tram and bus links. Brixton has tube + rail, Clapham has 3 tube stations + rail, so all these areas are fine.

    @Marcusm can I ask, if from UK travelling to Ireland do you know if it works the same way as in being easy to open a bank account, say a 'new to Ireland' account? Im spending 9 months in Ireland next year and I hear before anyone can get a PPS number, proof of permanent Irish address is needed. But, I wanted to get PPS immediately is possible, and I'll be in a hotel for 1st 2 weeks..

    Creole, I didn't know the answer to your PPS question but did a quick search, follow the URL bellow for a link to the civil service guidance. As you'll see, the hotel or your employer could give you a letter. Alternatively, if you were born in Ireland you may already have such a number (previously known as an RSI number).

    On the bank accounts point, I live in Ireland part time now (in Dublin as I type) and I still use the account opened for me when I was 7!!! It had been completely inactive for 10 years or so and I went buck to it because I was a little frustrated in trying to open a new account. Don't take that as a bad sign as I am famously impatient (and intemperate, but that is another matter).

    http://www.welfare.ie/EN/OperationalGuidelines/Pages/cis_ppsallprocs.aspx


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 164 ✭✭ Sugarfree


    dmcg90 wrote: »
    Hi, I'm a 20 year old student currently in NUIG. I'm planning on moving over to London in May/June next year. I however have zero clue what I need/have to do.

    I would like to know:
    Do I need to get permission to live there, visa etc?
    What do I need to work there?
    What do I need in terms of having a doctor over there?
    What kind of rents will I be facing (preferably Zone 2 - South London).

    I'm looking into starting internships in Marketing next summer, these aren't very well paid/not paid at all. Would this complicate my situation?

    I basically know nothing about what I need to do to make moving over there a reality come May/June.

    Any help is massively appreciated.

    I mean this in the nicest possible way but you seem very naive about the UK, are you sure you want to be moving over on your own? do you know anyone over there. I think you'll struggle there on your own especially when your asking questions about visas.


  • Registered Users Posts: 57 ✭✭✭ ipadzz


    Hey,

    I'm in the exact same boat! I'm just about to finish up my DCU degree in Journalism and as part of it we have to do a placement. I'm hardly staying in this hellhole and have always maintained that it's my dream to live and work in London.

    I'm planning on doing my internship/placement over there and staying on afterwards. I'll most likely be moving over in late april/very early May as the placement is from early may-mid july.

    I'm in the same kinda predicament. No idea where to start, although lots of friends have spent summers in London or have moved for brief periods of time. I also have some questions to add to the debate!

    -Would you say it's better to start scouting definite areas/estates/roads/actual flats to live in while still here in Ireland (on websites and stuff) or just to wait until you actually move over there and just dive right in?? I'm a bit wary of moving over without some form of inclination as to a distinct place to live.

    Friends have advised me that London estate agents' flats fly out their doors so quickly that by the time you have found a flat advertised online, it's probably gone... Also been warned to avoid Gumtree uk? Dunno why.

    -I'm thinking of moving to the East end (maybe shoreditch/stepney/Hackney/Poplar/Millwall/Bethnal Green). I'd love to find a place in spitalfields but it's ridiculously expensive. Any tips/hints/advice about East End?


    Must try out that Newry Office. I'm working in a department store over here in Dundrum so it will be very easy to get transferred to a London branch for part-time work. So in saying that, it would be handy to get an NI number really quickly just as I move over.


  • Registered Users Posts: 243 ✭✭ Ouchette


    ipadzz wrote: »
    Hey,

    -Would you say it's better to start scouting definite areas/estates/roads/actual flats to live in while still here in Ireland (on websites and stuff) or just to wait until you actually move over there and just dive right in?? I'm a bit wary of moving over without some form of inclination as to a distinct place to live.

    I'd definitely recommend having an idea of the area you want to live in first, even if it's just NE, NW, SE, SW and inner/outer or within x minutes commute of y. London is too big for it to be practical to not narrow it down at all first imo.
    Friends have advised me that London estate agents' flats fly out their doors so quickly that by the time you have found a flat advertised online, it's probably gone... Also been warned to avoid Gumtree uk? Dunno why.

    I agree on both accounts. I looked at ads online before moving and almost none of the ones I'd seen were available. I ended up having far more success by picking an area, walking into the first estate agent I saw and asking them what they could show me. I think it's more that they're crap at updating websites than anything else though. Gumtree just seemed to have a lot of weirdos and crap flats owned by crap landlords. Loot was a bit better.

    I can't help much with the inner part of the East End. Good fun but feels every bit as urban as it is is my impression of it.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators Posts: 10,487 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Fysh


    Gumtree's good for short-term accommodation, as most agencies are bloody useless. For longer term stuff, it's worth checking but you have to remember that by dealing direct with a landlord you may have to put up with the sort of nonsense that an agency wouldn't allow - and you also have to make sure you know about your rights and things like the Deposit Protection Scheme.


  • Registered Users Posts: 77 ✭✭ borabora


    Hi! I'm planning to move to London in February or March. Looking to flat/house share in Hackney. Just wondering if anyone might have any better suggestions for places to look for this kind of thing than gumtree or loot? Thank you!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 20 ✭✭✭ cupan


    borabora wrote: »
    Hi! I'm planning to move to London in February or March. Looking to flat/house share in Hackney. Just wondering if anyone might have any better suggestions for places to look for this kind of thing than gumtree or loot? Thank you!


    Hi Borabora

    I am moving to Hackney tomorrow, I am just so happy to be getting out of this hellhole of a country, our present government doesn't the capability of running a brothal even if they even tried!!! and the incoming one dosen't look much better. We should never have left the reins of the British, the Irish are just too fickle to do anything right.
    I am lucky I have a brother to go to. Goodluck in your quest for accommmodation and let me know how you get on.


  • Registered Users Posts: 27 ✭✭✭ Stratus


    sitstill wrote: »
    I did both of these things in Newry, opening an account with Bank of Ireland up there, as it's a UK account it works in London and you can lodge and withdraw money in any Post Office in the UK if you need to.

    If you ring the Newry Benefits Office on 048 3026 5522 and explain that you are moving to the UK, they will invite you to an interview and assign you a NI number. This will make starting a job much easier.

    Try'd this (getting NI in the north). The guy I was talking to said that I would be ok to go over with out NI, that I would be looking @ maybe 2 weeks tops or I could possible get it on the day if I walked in to one of the job centres think he called it I jobs or something like that.
    And that I could work on a temporary NI that the employer can sort out. Suppose it’s like emergency tax here?
    But suppose i should say that he did also mention that its is up to the employers whether they take somebody on that hasn't got a NI and that some could be fussy?
    Just my 2 cent


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,104 ✭✭✭✭ djpbarry


    Stratus wrote: »
    Try'd this (getting NI in the north). The guy I was talking to said that I would be ok to go over with out NI...
    The NI really isn’t a big issue. Technically you can’t apply for one until you’re living in the UK, which seems a bit bizarre to be honest – you think it would make sense to encourage people to get their affairs in order before they relocate. But, I really can’t see a prospective employer making an issue out of it.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 13,104 ✭✭✭✭ djpbarry


    dmcg90 wrote: »
    Do I need to get permission to live there, visa etc?
    You’re kidding, right?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,608 ✭✭✭ breadmonkey


    djpbarry wrote: »
    You’re kidding, right?

    Pointless contribution is pointless :rolleyes: As a mod, what would your reaction have been if someone had posted something equally trite in one of your forums?


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,104 ✭✭✭✭ djpbarry


    Pointless contribution is pointless
    I am genuinely curious to know how a prospective Irish graduate could be of the belief that a visa is required to work in the UK/EU.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators Posts: 10,487 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Fysh


    djpbarry wrote: »
    I am genuinely curious to know how a prospective Irish graduate could be of the belief that a visa is required to work in the UK/EU.

    I'm sure you are curious about it, but by asking an irrelevant question in a rude manner you're taking the thread off-topic, particularly since the question has already been addressed by previous posters.

    Let's get things back on track.


  • Registered Users Posts: 504 ✭✭✭ Ironman76


    Some class advice. Considering a move over myself soon and have had a lot of questions answered here. Good stuff.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 878 rainbowdash


    People should do their banking in southern Ireland with Ulster bank as they are part of natwest who have branches on every high street in the UK.

    I can pop into an Ulster bank in southern ireland whenever I need anything verified or witnessed while I am not over there (UK)

    I don't think you need to go to Newry to open the bank account either, it can be done over the phone and verified at a southern branch (Ulster bank) already being an Ulster Bank account holder is an advantage.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,104 ✭✭✭✭ djpbarry


    People should do their banking in southern Ireland with Ulster bank as they are part of natwest who have branches on every high street in the UK.
    I’m not sure it makes any difference. I bank with Ulster Bank in Ireland, but, when I moved to London, I couldn’t open an account with either NatWest or RBS – they both insisted on evidence of at least 6 months UK residency.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 878 rainbowdash


    djpbarry wrote: »
    I’m not sure it makes any difference. I bank with Ulster Bank in Ireland, but, when I moved to London, I couldn’t open an account with either NatWest or RBS – they both insisted on evidence of at least 6 months UK residency.

    That wasn't the point I was making, I'm saying that if you happen to be in Ireland when you need something witnessed or verified then you can do it at a local branch in the south of Ireland.

    You can also open a UK non resident (or not ordinarily resident or some other name) account with a republic of Ireland address. I have one so it can definately be done. The account has the same facilities as a UK residental account.

    The best branch to ring is probably Newry because they would deal with these queries the most.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,131 ✭✭✭✭ Lemming


    djpbarry wrote: »
    The NI really isn’t a big issue. Technically you can’t apply for one until you’re living in the UK, which seems a bit bizarre to be honest – you think it would make sense to encourage people to get their affairs in order before they relocate. But, I really can’t see a prospective employer making an issue out of it.

    I called up the NI phone line to start the ball rolling as soon as I was made an offer of a job (starting two weeks later), but they wouldn't have any of it and said I had to be 'resident' in the UK before they'd even consider processing an application.

    TBH, whilst my employer had no bother with it, the Dept. of Health (for whom I'm working on behalf) were incredibly anal about it and were just an effort to deal with for about two months (which is about how long it took); but my company dealt with most of that for me and fought my corner so other than some mild inconveniences it was alright. I got put on Basic Rate tax (30%) whilst waiting for my NI number, but I'll get the difference back.

    I found it very peculiar that the NI folks weren't prepared to process an application. I can appreciate if someone who isn't resident yet doesn't have work lined up, but I did.

    Banking, by contrast, was a doddle. In order to get paid, I had to have a UK account but once I showed proof of address (I showed my receipt & letter for temporary accommodation with Unite Students) and a statement from my employer, Lloyds were happy to start the ball rolling. Took a couple of weeks to get the account/card/etc. but no particular issues.

    Mobile phone operators however were another kettle of fish; Vodafone wanted three months up front from me for a bill phone because I had no credit history in the UK, and other services were similar.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 13,104 ✭✭✭✭ djpbarry


    That wasn't the point I was making...
    Sorry – my mistake.
    Lemming wrote: »
    I called up the NI phone line to start the ball rolling as soon as I was made an offer of a job (starting two weeks later), but they wouldn't have any of it and said I had to be 'resident' in the UK before they'd even consider processing an application.
    I encountered the same problem myself – seems like an utterly bizarre approach to me. Why not allow prospective immigrants get their affairs in order before arriving in the UK?
    Lemming wrote: »
    Banking, by contrast, was a doddle. In order to get paid, I had to have a UK account but once I showed proof of address (I showed my receipt & letter for temporary accommodation with Unite Students) and a statement from my employer, Lloyds were happy to start the ball rolling.
    I went with Lloyds too, for the simple reason that no other bank (that I am aware of) would consider my application because I had no history of residence in the UK, giving Lloyds an apparent monopoly on the “new arrivals” market.
    Lemming wrote: »
    Mobile phone operators however were another kettle of fish; Vodafone wanted three months up front from me for a bill phone because I had no credit history in the UK, and other services were similar.
    I opted against a bill phone for that very reason, although I still had to provide ID and proof of address when collecting my pre-ordered phone from the shop.


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