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Teaching in England, what is it like?

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Comments



  • phish wrote: »
    Ya thats the one going over for college for a week and was just wondering what the school/area is like?


    how u mean you are going over for college? I know that school well. !!! and area! :D




  • becklyncho wrote: »
    Heydeldel

    WHAT? £35 per week??????? MY PAYROLL COMPANY ONLY CHARGE £6 per week??????? How are you living???

    That's why I feel so broke all the time! I'm submitting any and every expense I can now though. What umbrella company are you with??




  • becklyncho wrote: »
    how u mean you are going over for college? I know that school well. !!! and area! :D

    Don't want to bring the thread off topic so I have sent you a PM :)




  • aunt aggie wrote: »
    Working in the UK hasnt been as much work as I thought it would be. I only plan lessons if I'm been observed, which isnt that often. I have to follow department policy on marking books and reporting on student progress but more experienced teachers are great at offering advice on shortcuts that cut down this workload. Theyre also great at sharing resources that makes say to day planning of lessons a doddle. I'm working in an outstanding school so there are no behavioural issues and I really enjoy it.

    What are your subjects? If you have subjects that are in short supply you can afford to be fussy about the areas and types of school you apply to. I can suggest the agency I worked through if you want to pm me.



    ''I'm working in an outstanding school so there are no behavioural issues''

    ignore crap like this-whoever wrote this post clearly works for an agency, Ofsted rating is usually little reflection of what really happens in schools. I've worked in outstanding schools which had terrible behaviour and likewise colleagues told me they'd worked in special measures schools where the behaviour was good. Bottom line is outstanding does in no way equate to outstanding behaviour or diligent students-DO NOT BE FOOLED!




  • As soon as my NQT year is finished I'm out of here. It's really hard being here by yourself. I'd try and come over with someone on your course. You'd be better off drinking with your mates at home and complaining about things than being here.


    Yes exactly, I sat and moaned at home so I came here and frankly I wish i'd stayed at home, it is tough coming here especially on your own and doubly especially as a fresh face out of college with no experience. The behaviour in the schools are very poor I find namely the 1s were jobs are readily available. Notice how agencies never seem to have jobs for grammar schools[behaviour is good in these thus jobs are not as available] and support in bad schools is not great- if you can't get control in the class nobody's gonna step in and help you sadly i found. It can be a baptism of fire- your are thrown into classes of 30 kids with many messers and it can be a sink or swim situation whereby if you look for help they'll let you drown. You will find yourself getting blamed for the behaviour and given useless behaviour advice like 'praise them'. 'be nice', 'engage them' and certainly not advice those giving to you would ever use themselves.... Bottom line i'd say is that if you can try staying in Ireland-England is not worth it and can ruin your confidence in the job for life. Read old Andrews blog on the tough English schools were many of the jobs are advertised for and it explains them quite well, one quote he says is 'some schools makes it impossible' for nqts due to bad support which is very true. He also talks about behaviour codes and how teachers who try to use them often get told to stop using it and punishing the kids [i did in my school too]. The amount of bullying i found from management in the school was shocking.

    Teaching in England is not for everybody and many people are put off it quickly just by the behaviour alone, never mind the bullying managers, crazy politics or the excessive paperwork and quit- staff turn over rates are massive and there is a shortage in certain places which should tell you that many people simply can't hack it. The stats say 4-5 in every 10 leave the profession here within the 1st 5 years and TES and the internet is full of forums of people saying they hate it. I know 4 people from my college class that went home early and know another 4 that are going home when their contracts end after just 1 year. Bottom line is that it's a job here that can easily dominate your life and every waking moment can turn into school school school. If you want to do it here then your heart has to be in it 100 percent and you got to enjoy it and be very motivated otherwise it's an uphill struggle that can stress test you to destruction so just consider it wisely and be very weary of agency promises or those with 'good experiences' on forums which are suspicious.


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  • Hi folks,

    Anyone heard of 'Engage Education', can't find them on RATEMYTEACHINGAGENCY'. Are they particularly good for SEN teaching posts outside London?

    What's the pay like for experienced teachers from Ireland?

    Regards & thanks......




  • Does one work for the agency or the school board / authority?

    Has it become like manufacturing industry here in Ireland, where you are employed by an agency and are hired out to a company for work?




  • I used an agency to get in the door, and then schools if they like you will put you on a permanent contract sooner rather than later. Its handy to get things done like the CRB check. Engage are alright - I've heard mixed reviews about them, but I've always found the Irish office pretty good to deal with. I don't know in terms of SEN teaching - most if not all of the recruitment for the UK is done already as UK starts their drive around February.

    Worth giving their Dublin office a call and see what they can do for you. By outside London, what areas are you looking at?




  • Hardest thing I've ever done, teaching in UK for 3 years, don't recommend it at all. Terrible behavior, kids who need spoon feeding, they don't have pens never mind anything else. Exhausting, meetings all the time, I'm surprised I didn't have a break down full-on.. go to the Middle East !




  • ruahead wrote: »
    Hardest thing I've ever done, teaching in UK for 3 years, don't recommend it at all. Terrible behavior, kids who need spoon feeding, they don't have pens never mind anything else. Exhausting, meetings all the time, I'm surprised I didn't have a break down full-on.. go to the Middle East !

    Does depend on the school! It is extremely hard work, but doing a year or two in the UK is beneficial to everyone


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