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M6 Briarhill Roundabout

  • 22-02-2013 8:10pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 25 R1200RT


    Anyone know what's going on at the roundabout in Briarhill at the start/end of the M6 motorway? There's been work going on there for the last couple of weeks, with no real sign of any potential improvements.


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Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,790 ✭✭✭confuseddotcom


    Alas don't know what's going on. Sorry. :/ But by any chance would ya be a newb to Galway and its' arra twill be grand tendencies?! :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 25 R1200RT


    No, sorry. Just interested in roundabout's...


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,568 ✭✭✭ethernet


    Are they not making it smaller at last? It was completely oversized and the lanes were so tight around it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25 R1200RT


    Actually I'm secretly hoping they put traffic lights on the roundabout. God I love traffic lights on roundabouts.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,515 ✭✭✭✭Mrs OBumble


    ethernet wrote: »
    Are they not making it smaller at last? It was completely oversized and the lanes were so tight around it.

    Pretty sure you're right.

    I hate RABs in general, but don't mind that one :-)


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  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 14,166 Mod ✭✭✭✭Zzippy


    AFAIK they're enlarging the outer perimeter to make the lanes wider and not as tight - there have been a number of bad accidents. I think Fey or another poster on here had personal experience of this...


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 25,234 ✭✭✭✭Sponge Bob


    and slathering on 360 degrees of antiskid I hope. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,184 ✭✭✭Fey!


    Zzippy wrote: »
    AFAIK they're enlarging the outer perimeter to make the lanes wider and not as tight - there have been a number of bad accidents. I think Fey or another poster on here had personal experience of this...

    ...and I haven't been able to pass it since without cringing!!!

    I was one of the few who didn't actually hit the roundabout itself (which, going by the amount of times the signage has been knocked, have been several dozen); I managed to drop down the embankment as you exit the roundabout on the town side!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,156 ✭✭✭Iwannahurl


    Sponge Bob wrote: »
    and slathering on 360 degrees of antiskid I hope. :)




    I've noticed that anti-skid surface treatment around a number of Galway roundabouts, though not at other junctions in the city.

    In some cases the 'wearing course' is bumpy tarmac, which I suspect is intended to have the same effect.

    Which prompts me to ask: why do roundabouts in particular need antiskid treatment, whether 360 degrees or otherwise?


  • Registered Users Posts: 25 R1200RT


    Iwannahurl wrote: »
    Which prompts me to ask: why do roundabouts in particular need antiskid treatment, whether 360 degrees or otherwise?

    If you had the time to observe any of Galway's roundabouts at 3 o'clock in the morning, all would become clear.....


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,645 ✭✭✭yer man!


    Making the driving lanes around the roundabout larger along with the entrances and exits to it.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,156 ✭✭✭Iwannahurl


    R1200RT wrote: »
    If you had the time to observe any of Galway's roundabouts at 3 o'clock in the morning, all would become clear.....





    Gwan, save me having to get out of bed at that ungodly hour. What's the story?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,390 ✭✭✭Stench Blossoms


    People 'drifting' around them.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,156 ✭✭✭Iwannahurl


    Ah, OK.

    Anti-skid surface and caltrops needed then.




  • Iwannahurl wrote: »
    I've noticed that anti-skid surface treatment around a number of Galway roundabouts, though not at other junctions in the city.

    In some cases the 'wearing course' is bumpy tarmac, which I suspect is intended to have the same effect.

    Which prompts me to ask: why do roundabouts in particular need antiskid treatment, whether 360 degrees or otherwise?

    The new junctions that replaced the old N6 RAB's all have this coating as do several other junctions around the town.

    One RAB entrance badly in need of it is here (blue van). Its next to impossible to move onto the RAB promptly when its wet without getting wheel spin


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,156 ✭✭✭Iwannahurl


    DaCor wrote: »
    The new junctions that replaced the old N6 RAB's all have this coating as do several other junctions around the town.

    One RAB entrance badly in need of it is here (blue van). Its next to impossible to move onto the RAB promptly when its wet without getting wheel spin





    Perhaps anti-skid is now a standard element of the design spec of any new junction.

    It may have to be 'retro-fitted' to existing junctions, in which case it's not universal and as far as I can see there is no clear pattern to its application.

    If wheel spin is a problem when entering the Kirwan Roundabout from the N6 as you describe, what about braking at that spot? Are there vehicles skidding and entering the roundabout in an uncontrolled manner?

    Was that happening at Coolagh as well?


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,106 ✭✭✭antoobrien


    Iwannahurl wrote: »
    Perhaps anti-skid is now a standard element of the design spec of any new junction.

    It may have to be 'retro-fitted' to existing junctions, in which case it's not universal and as far as I can see there is no clear pattern to its application.

    Yes it is part of the new specs and there is a clear pattern of application if one knows when the new specs came into force - the junctions done since the new specs came into for have this surface.
    Iwannahurl wrote: »
    If wheel spin is a problem when entering the Kirwan Roundabout from the N6 as you describe, what about braking at that spot? Are there vehicles skidding and entering the roundabout in an uncontrolled manner?

    I haven't noticed any problems down there under breaking, but I have noticed on numerous roads (across the country) that it's easy to get wheel spin in wet conditions.
    Iwannahurl wrote: »
    Was that happening at Coolagh as well?

    It's bad for wheel spin if the road is damp.

    I've noticed they've also put in yellow rumble strips on the approaches. I think this style is ineffective and there's a slightly different style that has several narrow strips covering the same area which is far more effective in making the driver slow down.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,226 ✭✭✭Unrealistic


    Iwannahurl wrote: »
    If wheel spin is a problem when entering the Kirwan Roundabout from the N6 as you describe, what about braking at that spot? Are there vehicles skidding and entering the roundabout in an uncontrolled manner?
    That is definitely a problem spot. I've experienced wheel spin/loss of traction there but not at other roundabout entrances (even other entrances to that same roundabout). I've never seen anyone not braking in time but the line of sight there means that you don't know whether the roundabout is clear or not until you are very close so it's not one that lends itself to approaching at speed and sailing through. There are also pedestrian lights right on that entrance which might further discourage high speed approaches.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21 jewelstar


    That is definitely a problem spot. I've experienced wheel spin/loss of traction there but not at other roundabout entrances (even other entrances to that same roundabout). I've never seen anyone not braking in time but the line of sight there means that you don't know whether the roundabout is clear or not until you are very close so it's not when that lends itself to approaching at speed and sailing through. There are also pedestrian lights right on that entrance which might further discourage high speed approaches.

    Thought it was just my car at this spot. It's actually dangerous enough if as is the case at peak time traffic trying to get onto the roundabout quickly, the car is at a momentary standstill halfway out on the outside lane before eventually getting to grip.
    Never had an issue stopping at it though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,645 ✭✭✭yer man!


    jewelstar wrote: »
    Thought it was just my car at this spot. It's actually dangerous enough if as is the case at peak time traffic trying to get onto the roundabout quickly, the car is at a momentary standstill halfway out on the outside lane before eventually getting to grip.
    Never had an issue stopping at it though.

    Same problem with my car, the traction control can barely cope with the surface it's so bad. The council put on a coating about 6 months ago, it lasted like 2 weeks before completely wearing off. I doubt they will do anything substantial with this road seeing as they want to get rid of the entire RAB.


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 25,234 ✭✭✭✭Sponge Bob


    DaCor wrote: »
    One RAB entrance badly in need of it is here (blue van). Its next to impossible to move onto the RAB promptly when its wet without getting wheel spin

    Totally agree, cannot get any power down there if any way damp or you will spin. It is the worst RAB entrance I know of in Galway. That leads to unnecessary tailbacks towards the Tuam Road too, esp in the evenings.


  • Registered Users Posts: 187 ✭✭Mr Man


    DaCor wrote: »
    The new junctions that replaced the old N6 RAB's all have this coating as do several other junctions around the town.

    One RAB entrance badly in need of it is here (blue van). Its next to impossible to move onto the RAB promptly when its wet without getting wheel spin

    That exit is hilarious (in a bad way). All the cars I've owned had wheel spin issues with it.

    I now automatically soft accelerate away from there.

    For me, the question is how did they get the design of the M6 RAB so wrong?

    They are spending a pretty penny on the remedial works so somebody somewhere messed up.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,156 ✭✭✭Iwannahurl


    Zzippy wrote: »
    AFAIK they're enlarging the outer perimeter to make the lanes wider and not as tight - there have been a number of bad accidents. I think Fey or another poster on here had personal experience of this...




    Not as tight -- can you elaborate?


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 25,234 ✭✭✭✭Sponge Bob


    Try going around parallel to an artic and you might understand.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,156 ✭✭✭Iwannahurl


    Obviously if they're modifying it by reducing the centre island and widening the lanes then they've identified those elements as problematic. Has the carriageway width been identified as the main cause of the allegedly high number of collisions there?


  • Registered Users Posts: 25 R1200RT


    Mr Man wrote: »

    For me, the question is how did they get the design of the M6 RAB so wrong?

    They are spending a pretty penny on the remedial works so somebody somewhere messed up.

    Brilliantly (and subtly) brought back on topic Mr Man!

    For a new road design who is taking responsibility for getting it so wrong? The Designers; or those who approved the design?

    The Contractor who built the M6 did so using an approved design (even if he designed it); then he built it; and then he charges a toll to finance it.

    Any subsequent alteration to the design post-construction would have to be instructed by the Employer (Council) as it is outside the scope of the original Contract. If the Contractor is instructed to do the work he is obviously entitled to reimbursement from the person/authority issuing the instruction.

    So - who has been penalized for getting the original design wrong? The Contractor - no; the Designers - no; the Council's Design Consultants - no; the Council - no.

    The honest hard-working taxpayer who is now being shafted for what should be unnecessary remedial works? - BINGO!


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,106 ✭✭✭antoobrien


    R1200RT wrote: »
    For a new road design who is taking responsibility for getting it so wrong? The Designers; or those who approved the design?!

    It was got wrong because it was designed to be built alongside GCOB. By the time it was clear that it wasn't going ahead it was too late to change because it was finished.

    So blame the anti-bypass crowd before you blame builders that did what they were told to do.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,156 ✭✭✭Iwannahurl


    antoobrien wrote: »
    It was got wrong because it was designed to be built alongside GCOB. By the time it was clear that it wasn't going ahead it was too late to change because it was finished.

    So blame the anti-bypass crowd before you blame builders that did what they were told to do.




    What is the relevance of the GCOB and the "anti-bypass crowd" to the physical carriageway width of a roundabout that is reportedly "too tight"?

    Would the Coolagh roundabout, with the same design, have somehow been 'looser' with the GCOB in place?


  • Registered Users Posts: 25 R1200RT


    True. The GCOB is always welcome, but it has no relevance to the design or configuration of the roundabout currently undergoing re-work at considerable expense.

    The fact is that this expense could have been avoided through proper (and accountable) design and planning.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,156 ✭✭✭Iwannahurl


    Are there any crucial design differences between the M6 Coolagh Roundabout and this one at the end of the M2 near Ashbourne?


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