Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on [email protected] for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact [email protected]

learning to fly with aircorps

  • 30-07-2012 12:25am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 122 ✭✭


    I will be finishing college next year and I would love to learn to fly. I have done some research and it seems that the cost of getting a pilot licence is huge. I was considering if joining the aircorps (cadets) is a more affordable option.

    If I tried this option, does anyone know how long I'd have to stay in the aircorps for? plus, how well recognised internationally is the pilot training I would receive.

    Thanks in advance


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,358 ✭✭✭Geekness1234


    I have heard that British Airlines will be running a cadetship programme for the next 3/4 years.
    Look into this it's pretty cool.

    Air Corps pilots get the NATO minimum of 70 hours annually.
    You'd recieve just as good pilot training in chosen aircraft (provided your selected) as would any French,American or British pilot would.
    I have heard 8 years for service but this could be way off.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,827 ✭✭✭Donny5


    If I tried this option, does anyone know how long I'd have to stay in the aircorps for? plus, how well recognised internationally is the pilot training I would receive.

    Air Corps Cadets get a fixed term 12 year commission.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 794 ✭✭✭bluecode


    You won't get into the Air Corps if your motivation is to use it as a stepping stone to an airline job. They're looking for someone interested in a military career first and foremost and individuals must also fit their requirements. As competition is fierce you will almost certainly be found out and eliminated early.

    If you do get in you will be tied to the Air Corps for a number of years.

    My suggestion is to leave the Air Corps to those people who really want a military career.

    If you haven't got the money to learn to fly now. Then start to make a plan to get the money. Even if it takes five years to get it together. It's still less of a committment than joining the Air Corps and if you have what it takes you will be flying airliners long before you would if you had joined the Air Corps.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 114 ✭✭Midnight Oil


    The pilots that I trained with all had to resit their AC exams again in civvie street. Their qualifications did not transfer over. They usually tried to sit the same exams as soon after their AC exams as was possible as this reduced the study they had to do as the syllabus was the same or very very similar.

    Some I know actually failed the civvie exam after passing the AC exam and another failed the AC exam and passed the civvie exam!

    This though was over 10 years ago so things may have changed slightly.

    As far as I am aware, AC pilots are on the same commission as I am, no time limit. AFAIK only Direct Entrants are on Specific Time Frame Commissions. Many would leave after 12 years though as we qualified for the the old pension at that stage


  • Registered Users Posts: 690 ✭✭✭westdub


    Air Corps officers will be offered a 12 year fixed term commission. During
    the three months immediately prior to completing the fixed term commission,
    an Air Corps Officer may apply to the Minister for Defence for a commission
    without limitation as to time. The Minister for Defence may grant a
    commission without limitation as to time, subject to the existence of a suitable
    vacancy, and provided that the officer is:
    a. recommended by the Chief of Staff and
    b. is medically graded suitably, with a standard of vision not less than
    6/36 corrected to at least 6/9 in each eye and with normal colour and
    night vision.
    From..... http://www.military.ie/fileadmin/user_upload/Careers_docs/12-05-18__May__Cadet_Booklet_2012.pdf


  • Advertisement
  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,827 ✭✭✭Donny5


    The pilots that I trained with all had to resit their AC exams again in civvie street. Their qualifications did not transfer over. They usually tried to sit the same exams as soon after their AC exams as was possible as this reduced the study they had to do as the syllabus was the same or very very similar.

    Some I know actually failed the civvie exam after passing the AC exam and another failed the AC exam and passed the civvie exam!

    This though was over 10 years ago so things may have changed slightly.

    As far as I am aware, AC pilots are on the same commission as I am, no time limit. AFAIK only Direct Entrants are on Specific Time Frame Commissions. May would leave after 12 years though we qualified for the the old pension at that stage

    When I looked into an Air Corps cadetship about 7 years ago, the booklet said (as it did this year):
    Air Corps officers will be offered a 12 year fixed term commission.

    That's from this. I imagine in practice, they don't turn away many pilots that want to extend their commission after the twelve, though.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 114 ✭✭Midnight Oil


    westdub wrote: »

    Thank you. Was unaware of that. Must use it as a slagging right. Air Corps officers are obviously on a 12 year probation period :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 927 ✭✭✭Maybe_Memories


    Air Corps pilots get the NATO minimum of 70 hours annually.

    Just over an hour a week? Seriously?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 794 ✭✭✭bluecode


    Don't think it's that bad but one or two Air Corp pilots I knew were not happy with their annual hours. Some of the enlisted people who got their licences had more civvie hours than the full time officers. Sometimes they found themselves in airline jobs as FOs alongide their enlisteded colleagues who were now Captains.

    Pilots need hours, they love flying hours. Mil or not.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 68 ✭✭Davehopper


    Why dont you apply to the new maritime air service thats settin up at Galway airport shortly .


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 3,798 ✭✭✭Local-womanizer


    Davehopper wrote: »
    Why dont you apply to the new maritime air service thats settin up at Galway airport shortly .

    Probably because that only exists in your head?


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 68 ✭✭Davehopper


    Probably because that only exists in your head?

    And in the heads of the decision makers. Trust me you will hear an announcement regarding this in the next 6 weeks. Operations are due to commence late January/early February 2013. Quick search online and you will see ripples everywhere regarding this move, this forum seems to be in the dark.

    OP, watch out for an announcement regarding recruitment soon after the plan is announced. Roles up for grabs are HEMS paramedics, ground staff and CASA observers. The pilots will initially be from Bal but this will change. Pilot selection will be different as there will be no cadetship, NCO's will get promoted to officer/pilot.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 68 ✭✭Davehopper


    The main reason behind the decision http://http://planning.southdublin.ie/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=307&Itemid=359&lang=

    Reduced capacity at bal due to the those plans have forced the long thought of move of mairtime and certain helicopter operations to Galway.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,024 ✭✭✭Owryan


    Davehopper wrote: »
    Why dont you apply to the new maritime air service thats settin up at Galway airport shortly .

    Googled "new maritime air service Galway" and only link is to your thread here http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2056722794


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 794 ✭✭✭bluecode


    Davehopper, you are heading for a permaban. Good bye.


Advertisement