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Advice/Questions on buying Cameras & Accessories MkII. **Please read OP first**

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  • 05-10-2010 8:57am
    #1
    Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Entertainment Moderators Posts: 9,047 CMod ✭✭✭✭


    This forum gets many posts seeking advice on purchasing a new camera and accessories. These posts are often along much the same lines and so the advice given out also tends to be similar.

    There is already a lot of advice in the FAQ Thread where the first link is "What Camera should I buy?" This should be you first point of reference before posting. If you still have questions then see if an answer already posted here applies to you.

    A few points to remember

    The regulars here are not likely to be using Point & Shoot Cameras very often and as such will not be overly familiar with those type of cameras. They will still try to give advice but often that will be from reading reviews online and then passing on that information.

    Many Photographers will be using a single system or brand. They will tend to be able to advise on that system but not as well on the others. Most will advise in which system they have familiarity.

    System preference can become Tribal and advice can be sometimes not be impartial. It can be like asking someone wearing a Team Jersey which team is best. The reply can be predictable. This is not always the case with Cameras but is a factor to keep in mind.

    Replies

    Please quote the question which you are answering. If the question is long consider editing it down to make it more concise.

    The previous posts in this thread can be found here

    I don't know why I put up this post as those who read it are those who don't require the advice. The gormless will just plough on in, post and it will require a merge into this thread. Oh well, such is life.


«13456725

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 92 ✭✭dubhoop


    Has anybody used one of these cameras?


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,756 ✭✭✭Thecageyone


    No, but I've read a few reviews on them. I don't really like that it has an EVF rather than optical. Other than that, they're a neat looking camera.

    If you do go for one, hunt down a Minolta 50mm f/1.7 - beauty of a lens, you'd get one for €100 or less on ebay. It's the one thing I miss about using Sony. Their kit lenses are awful. Hunt old minolta lenses that are compatible.


  • Registered Users Posts: 92 ✭✭dubhoop


    Thanks for the reply. Am still on the look out for an R1 but i have been looking at this one for a month or so. Does seem a nice wee camera. Going to do a bot off re-search on the new lens system.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,900 ✭✭✭InTheTrees


    I have one of the original Sony Alpha's and love it. Solid, well built and reliable.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,756 ✭✭✭Thecageyone


    I loved my A200, until it suffered a knock :( The body IS busted and the sensor knocked out of line. I still used it for a couple of months after but it was driving me mad. Could live without the IS but the sensor being off was annoying. Since switched to Nikon but I'd not rule out a switch back at some point. Ideally I'd love to have both options, if cash allowed. As some of those old minolta lenses are crackers.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 552 ✭✭✭Salmon Leap


    dubhoop wrote: »
    Thanks for the reply. Am still on the look out for an R1 but i have been looking at this one for a month or so. Does seem a nice wee camera. Going to do a bot off re-search on the new lens system.

    Was checking adverts.ie earlier, any interest to you? (BTW it's not me selling, haven't a clue who it is)

    http://www.adverts.ie/172257/digital-cameras/sony-dsc-r1-cybershot/


  • Registered Users Posts: 92 ✭✭dubhoop


    Was checking adverts.ie earlier, any interest to you? (BTW it's not me selling, haven't a clue who it is)

    http://www.adverts.ie/172257/digital-cameras/sony-dsc-r1-cybershot/


    thank you for the link. i already asked about this item. but no response since. a reputable user sold one also for €200. so i guess his value of €350 is a little high.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Entertainment Moderators Posts: 9,047 CMod ✭✭✭✭CabanSail


    Firstly - IT REALLY DOESN'T MATTER A TOSS WHICH CAMERA YOU BUY.

    Secondly - IT REALLY DOESN'T MATTER A TOSS WHICH CAMERA YOU BUY.

    >

    >

    >

    Twentyethly - Look at what system the person you know with the best range of glass and buy a compitiable body. Then borrow their glass until you can buy your own.

    Seriously .... All the brands are pretty close. Canokon are the market leaders, or is it Nikanon? They have the biggest range of glass and other accessories, as well as being supported by all the third party makers too. You will not go wrong with either one of them. Next on the list is Sony then Pentax etc. All of these make good gear too but don't quite have the range of toys like the big two.

    Whatever you buy you will sort of join that tribe. You will become loyal to it and follow it, a bit like someone who follows a sport team. In threads like this you will come and wave your tribes colours etc. This also holds true for many reviewers out there too.

    I am in one tribe. I know people in the other tribe and I pretend they are friends and will even acknowledge that they occasionally grab a good snap shot, despite their choice of gear. As deviant as they are I will say one thing positive for them, they leave my quality glass alone as it doesn't suit their puny bodies.

    So ..... I now have said a LOT and not helped with your choice. If your in it for the long haul then have a look at bodies from each system. Pick them up and see which feels most comfortable to YOU. Do this for the entry level bodies as well as the Prosumer bodies and the Pro bodies. I know you don't have the budget now, but that is where you are headed and this way you will get a feel for the system. After that flip a coin, read the entrails of a chicken, play some Tarot cards etc. Go back to rule one at the top and pick one and lay down your cash. Next do something which will make a difference, learn about Exposure unitil it's second nature, study composition until it's intuitive, teach you mind to see the world as your camera does and TAKE LOTS OF PHOTOGRAPHS! These are the things which are important.

    Lastly, and most importantly, HAVE FUN AND ENJOY IT.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 760 ✭✭✭hbr


    I rang simplyelectronics.net mentioned above, to ask about guarantee given that they are imports from HK as stated above. They provide a shop guarantee of one year.
    So whats the difference??????

    There are a number of differences. A 'shop guarantee' can be a problem
    when the shop is in Hong Kong.
    If there is a problem it will be taken back andn repaired or replaced

    Yes, but it has to be repaired in Asia.
    ....according to consumer law.

    According to HK consumer law.
    Does it make much difference where you buy then if the guarantees are pretty much the same?

    Items purchased from HK are not subject to EU distance selling regulations.
    Particularly the "cooling off period".

    Having to ship a camera to another part of the world is not
    just inconvenient, it can also have customs implications.
    Can you show that VAT has been paid on the item? If not,
    you may have problems with customs.
    A friend bought a nikon in UK ( she lives there) and had a fault with it in the first month. She had no satisfaction from Nikon and 3 months later was still without her camera.

    Unfortunately, poor service is not confined to HK. I have heard a
    few other tales about poor customer service from Nikon recently.

    I believe Olympus cameras have an international warranty.
    http://www.olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/world_warranty_home.asp

    That looks like a good reason for buying an Olympus.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,699 ✭✭✭ThOnda


    CabanSail wrote: »
    Firstly - IT REALLY DOESN'T MATTER A TOSS WHICH CAMERA YOU BUY.

    If you buy a Canon :D


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  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Entertainment Moderators Posts: 9,047 CMod ✭✭✭✭CabanSail


    ThOnda wrote: »
    If you buy a Canon :D


    I have..... a few times. *groan*


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,244 ✭✭✭✭Fr Tod Umptious


    Hi
    I am thinking of getting a Fujifilm FinePix S3300 bridge camera (DSLR is too expensive) and I have a quick question about the max exposure duration on it.

    The spec says
    Shutter speed 1/2000 to 8sec.

    Does anyone know if there is a the availability on it to open the shutter for as long as the user requires, like I used to have on my old Cannon film SLR, or will I be limited to a max of 8sec ?

    Thanks for your time.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,379 ✭✭✭peckerhead


    I don't think any of the Fuji bridge cameras has the equivalent of a B or T setting, unfortunately. Check the manual.

    I've another question - can anyone recommend a good, reasonably-priced compact for close-up (dental) photography, something that will autofocus without searching madly at distances of maybe 6" or so? I've looked at a few of the available models out there (including today's iBood offer and similar Lumix compacts) but in the short form of the specifications none of them says "Macro" or gives a minimum distance, and tracking down the full manual for everything is a bit of a chore.

    Anybody out there using something that fits the bill?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,641 ✭✭✭zero19


    hbr wrote: »
    The first thing you need to be aware of is that SE is a Hong Kong company.
    Despite the .ie domain, they have no physical presence here.

    I bought a lens from them recently. I had no problems except that it took a
    bit longer than the time suggested on their web page. The lens arrived in
    8 days. It was shipped from the UK via DHL six days after I placed my
    order. I received the package in good condition two days later.

    I would have some reservations about buying a camera body from
    them unless I could be sure it came with a European warranty
    card.

    Thanks for that, i was wondering why they're so cheap!


  • Registered Users Posts: 343 ✭✭alowe


    Help please ...

    I want to get a camera that I can have with me at all times, so am looking for a nice little compact. I have a canon dslr and numerous lenses, so for proper shots, I'm sorted, but i've found myself caught out of getting pics as the phone on my camera is too slow (and needs the object still!)

    Ideally this camera will live in my handbag or pocket. It needs to be able to take photos quickly, i.e. of kids moving or who don't pose or stay still for any length of time. Also, I don't want to have to wait an age to take a 2nd and 3rd shot, etc. A good optical zoom would be good too.

    My mother has a sony cybershot DSC-W380 which i've found great, so something as good as this would be nice. However, budget is an issue, so if a cheap and cheerful camera will do a similar job, then thats fine. However, if I spend a little bit more but get a brilliant compact that will last for years, then please advise away.

    Any guidance, greatly appreciated. (even if just to know exactly what spec I should look for to ensure I get a quick reacting shutter speed and lens.)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,420 ✭✭✭✭athtrasna


    I'm also looking for a compact. I'm not much of a photographer but like to capture special moments. Had a four year old Casio Exilim that was broken when someone knocked it out of my friend's hand when they were taking a photo of us and the lens jammed.

    Replaced it with a Samsung PL210 which went crazy when a single drop of rain hit the lens. The second PL210 which replaced it then seemed to have moisture in the LCD when I opened the box and the shutter would take 30 seconds to open. So that went back too.

    Heading to the US soon and figured I might get better value there, any recommendations..all purpose compact, rechargeable battery a must.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,746 ✭✭✭✭FewFew


    When it comes to compacts, tis hard to beat an aul Canon Ixus, or so I've always found.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,420 ✭✭✭✭athtrasna


    Thanks..will keep an eye out for one


  • Registered Users Posts: 38 dmckenna50


    Hi guys,

    I have the Canon 450D and I want to buy a new lens for it. I have the one it came with, the 18-55 lens but could someone suggest another? I don't have a specific use. Mostly family shots and landscapes. And does anyone know if there are reliable sites to buy second hand because I don't know that I could afford a brand new one. Any help is appreciated anyway!

    Thanks :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 201 ✭✭shemwhistler


    Hi folks,

    I've been seeing so much on here, and elsewhere about getting a 50mm prime lens, it seems to get a lot of love.

    I wanted to check a couple of things;

    1) Is this the offending beastie? http://www.canon.co.uk/For_Home/Product_Finder/Cameras/EF_Lenses/Standard_and_Medium_Telephoto/EF_50mm_f1.8_II/

    2) Will this fit on by 1000D body? (pretty sure it will as it's an ES mount)

    Thanks
    Matt


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,020 ✭✭✭jpb1974


    Adverts.ie is the place to look for used photography gear.

    In relation to what lens to buy... well it really depends on what you want to use it for... and your budget.

    Some basic lenses would include -

    Portrait
    Canon 50mm F1.8

    Landscape
    Sigma 10-20mm

    Sport
    Canon 70-200 F4 L

    But there are tons of other options out there.


  • Registered Users Posts: 301 ✭✭the_tractor


    Try a 50mm. I think the Canon ones are not expensive new, and everyone should have a nifty fifty.

    Everytime I use my 50mm I wonder why I don't use it more.

    Obviously a 50mm is no good for landscapes, cause with the crop factor it's around 80mm in old money, but it is great for portraits and indoor low light.


  • Registered Users Posts: 201 ✭✭shemwhistler


    Try a 50mm. I think the Canon ones are not expensive new, and everyone should have a nifty fifty.

    Everytime I use my 50mm I wonder why I don't use it more.

    Obviously a 50mm is no good for landscapes, cause with the crop factor it's around 80mm in old money, but it is great for portraits and indoor low light.

    Hi,

    I'm thinking of getting a nifty fifty, but I'm completely clueless when it comes to sensors and crop sizes and, well, stuff. I've seen it mentioned a few times here on the boards, but it just hasn't sunk in.

    Is there somewhere on the interwebs that I can read where it will succinctly tell me why that lens is no good for landscapes?

    I find the wikipedia pages on some of these topics to be extremely maths heavy and mind boggling, was hoping for more of an idiot's guide.

    Thanks
    Matt


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,138 ✭✭✭dinneenp


    Hi,

    I'm thinking of getting a nifty fifty, but I'm completely clueless when it comes to sensors and crop sizes and, well, stuff. I've seen it mentioned a few times here on the boards, but it just hasn't sunk in.

    Is there somewhere on the interwebs that I can read where it will succinctly tell me why that lens is no good for landscapes?

    I find the wikipedia pages on some of these topics to be extremely maths heavy and mind boggling, was hoping for more of an idiot's guide.

    Thanks
    Matt
    No good for landscapes as the focal length doesn't suit. e.g. when you look through the lens you won't see wide enough to get in all the landscape.
    If you have a zoom lens currently set it to 50mm (take a pic, check the data to know when you have exactly 50mm). Then try some shots with it and you'll see what the focal length is like.

    People like the lens as it's:
    1. small
    2. fixed focal length so you have to 'work' and think about the photo you want (walk to frame your pic instead of zoom in)
    3. has good/fast aperture which can produce shots with blurred background/select focus area
    4. get great photos*
    5. others probably

    This photo is f2.8, most nifty fiftys lens are 1.7 or thereabouts so you can blur background even more.

    some people love them, some don't use them that much. I have a 30mm f1.4 which I prefer as it's better for indoors as it's better for low light and I don't have to step back as much (with a 50mm indoors I often find that you can't get all your subject into the frame unless you step back a lot)

    AB67B82E75C542BAAA8B01C5AAE2F729-0000332953-0002468692-00500L-3774B17423344F2C8962A0C8C71316BC.jpg


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 760 ✭✭✭hbr


    dmckenna50 wrote: »
    Hi guys,

    I have the Canon 450D and I want to buy a new lens for it. I have the one it came with, the 18-55 lens but could someone suggest another?

    If you have the 18-55mm IS, you already have a fairly good lens.
    I don't have a specific use.

    Well then you should keep your money in the piggy-bank
    for now.
    Mostly family shots and landscapes.

    The 18-55mm is pretty good for that.

    The 18-55m is not so good for low light and/or fast action. Because
    if it's limited focal length, it is not good for some types of wildlife or
    sports photography.

    I get the feeling that you have a few quid burning a hole in your pocket
    and you are not sure what you should do with it. This leaves you at
    risk of buying something you don't need or won't use. You should only
    buy a new lens when you have a clear idea of what you want to achieve.

    A few examples:

    Low light portraits: Fast prime lens. The 50mm f/1.8 or 50mm f/1.4 USM.

    Macro and close up: Canon (or other brand) macro lens. Canon 100mm f/2.8 or Sigma/Tamron/Tokina equivalent.

    Sports/wildlife Canon or Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8

    And does anyone know if there are reliable sites to buy second hand because I don't know that I could afford a brand new one. Any help is appreciated anyway!

    Thanks :)

    I find adverts.ie and eBay are very good. You need to be alert for fraudsters.
    Some of the adverts.ie sellers are regular posters here on boards. Check feedback
    and posting history carefully.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 760 ✭✭✭hbr


    Hi folks,

    I've been seeing so much on here, and elsewhere about getting a 50mm prime lens, it seems to get a lot of love.

    A 50mm lens has something close to a normal field of view on a 35mm
    film camera or a full frame DSLR. On a camera with a smaller image sensor,
    it has a narrower field of view. It will be equivalent to about 80mm on your 1000D.
    If you want a 'normal' lens for your 1000D, you might consider a 35mm or even
    a 28mm lens instead. If you are happy with a narrower field of view which is well
    suited to portrait photography, you should find 50mm is a very useful focal length.

    That is the popular and reasonably priced 50mm f/1.8 aka 'nifty-fifty'.
    2) Will this fit on by 1000D body? (pretty sure it will as it's an ES mount)

    Yes it will.


  • Registered Users Posts: 201 ✭✭shemwhistler


    dinneenp wrote: »
    No good for landscapes as the focal length doesn't suit. e.g. when you look through the lens you won't see wide enough to get in all the landscape.
    If you have a zoom lens currently set it to 50mm (take a pic, check the data to know when you have exactly 50mm). Then try some shots with it and you'll see what the focal length is like.

    People like the lens as it's:
    1. small
    2. fixed focal length so you have to 'work' and think about the photo you want (walk to frame your pic instead of zoom in)
    3. has good/fast aperture which can produce shots with blurred background/select focus area
    4. get great photos*
    5. others probably

    This photo is f2.8, most nifty fiftys lens are 1.7 or thereabouts so you can blur background even more.

    some people love them, some don't use them that much. I have a 30mm f1.4 which I prefer as it's better for indoors as it's better for low light and I don't have to step back as much (with a 50mm indoors I often find that you can't get all your subject into the frame unless you step back a lot)

    Thanks for that, I have a follow on question from that, hopefully someone can she some light on it for me.

    Poor focal length for landscapes: Am I right in thinking that the focal length is the 50mm part of the lens description?

    I have the kit lens of 18 - 55mm which gives me a pretty good amount of magnification, but also can be wide enough for landscape stuff. Is it a case then that when I'm doing landscapey stuff (zoomed out) this is the 18mm end of the range, and when I'm doing portraits (zoomed in) this is the 55mm end?

    Or have I hopelessly oversimplified it and missed the point of focal length.


  • Registered Users Posts: 201 ✭✭shemwhistler


    hbr wrote: »
    A 50mm lens has something close to a normal field of view on a 35mm
    film camera or a full frame DSLR. On a camera with a smaller image sensor,
    it has a narrower field of view. It will be equivalent to about 80mm on your 1000D.
    If you want a 'normal' lens for your 1000D, you might consider a 35mm or even
    a 28mm lens instead. If you are happy with a narrower field of view which is well
    suited to portrait photography, you should find 50mm is a very useful focal length.

    Thanks hbr, so in real simple terms on the lens the larger the mm the narrower it is?

    And the sensor you have can reduce the 'actual' lens mm to I guess a 'perceived' mm value.

    So a more expensive body with a better sensor will use all of the lens.


    I hope that's right, and if it is it's finally starting to sink in :D

    If not, bugger.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 760 ✭✭✭hbr


    Thanks hbr, so in real simple terms on the lens the larger the mm the narrower it is?

    Yes. Longer focal length gives a narrower view.
    And the sensor you have can reduce the 'actual' lens mm to I guess a 'perceived' mm value.

    35mm film cameras have become widely accepted as the standard
    for film and sensor size. When considering sensors of a different size,
    it is common practice to use the 35mm film system as a reference.
    As a simple example, the smaller sensor used in the four-thirds
    system cameras have a crop factor of around 2. This means that a
    lens with a focal length of 25mm would have a field of view equivalent
    to a 50mm lens used on a 35mm film camera.

    The crop factor of the APC-C size sensor in your Canon is approximately
    1.6. This means the standard 18-55mm zoom lens is equivalent to
    29-88mm. Compact and bridge cameras have very small sensors and
    correspondingly short focal lengths. My Panasonic FZ28 lens spec is:

    Optical 18x zoom, fl4.8 mm to 86.4 mm (35 mm film camera
    equivalent: 27 mm to 486 mm)

    Most photographers would not have a clue what to expect from
    a camera with FL=4.8mm, but almost everybody knows that
    27mm equivalent is a reasonably wide angle lens.

    So a more expensive body with a better sensor will use all of the lens.

    Yes, particularly in the case of a lens which was designed for full frame. Canon
    EF-S lenses are optimised for crop sensor cameras and they are physically
    incompatible with full frame cameras. Some third party lenses for crop
    sensor cameras will fit, but they will suffer from severe vignetting because they
    are designed for the smaller image circle of a crop sensor.

    Your 1000D is compatible with both EF-S and EF lenses, so you don't
    have to worry about this unless you are planning to upgrade to a full frame
    camera in the future.
    I hope that's right, and if it is it's finally starting to sink in :D

    If not, bugger.

    I think you have got the general idea. You are quite right, optics are a
    bugger to understand.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 38 dmckenna50


    hbr wrote: »
    If you have the 18-55mm IS, you already have a fairly good lens.



    Well then you should keep your money in the piggy-bank
    for now.



    The 18-55mm is pretty good for that.

    The 18-55m is not so good for low light and/or fast action. Because
    if it's limited focal length, it is not good for some types of wildlife or
    sports photography.

    I get the feeling that you have a few quid burning a hole in your pocket
    and you are not sure what you should do with it. This leaves you at
    risk of buying something you don't need or won't use. You should only
    buy a new lens when you have a clear idea of what you want to achieve.

    A few examples:

    Low light portraits: Fast prime lens. The 50mm f/1.8 or 50mm f/1.4 USM.

    Macro and close up: Canon (or other brand) macro lens. Canon 100mm f/2.8 or Sigma/Tamron/Tokina equivalent.

    Sports/wildlife Canon or Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8




    I find adverts.ie and eBay are very good. You need to be alert for fraudsters.
    Some of the adverts.ie sellers are regular posters here on boards. Check feedback
    and posting history carefully.

    I think I love you. THANKS!


This discussion has been closed.
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