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Me Moth

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  • 27-07-2011 9:05am
    #1
    Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 5,737 ✭✭✭


    Often wondered why some men refer to their Girlfriend as their Moth. And how did this name come about, like most girlfriends don't resemble the chiefly nocturnal insect related to butterflies?

    Is it just a Dublin Thing?


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 40,867 ✭✭✭✭Xavi6


    It's not 'moth', it's from the Irish word 'maith'.

    Urban Dictionary probably has it more detailed.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 22,819 ✭✭✭✭g'em


    It's mot dear, mot. Not moth.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,489 ✭✭✭iMax


    It's "mot"

    Edit: damn mobile posting speeds


  • Registered Users Posts: 29,293 ✭✭✭✭Mint Sauce


    I can honestly say. I have no idea what your talking about OP.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 5,737 ✭✭✭MidlandsM


    MOT? as in Maith? As in Good? Fookin' hell, like I know Dubs can hardly speak right but.........


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,102 ✭✭✭mathie


    To quote the always correct (we were robbed in Eurovision btw) Dustin the Turkey...
    "This car needs an MOT. A good mot in it!"


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,808 ✭✭✭FatherLen


    my gf is a moth.... she likes lightbulbs and long walks on the beach.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 22,819 ✭✭✭✭g'em


    Xavi6 wrote: »
    It's not 'moth', it's from the Irish word 'maith'
    Pfft, Urban Dictionary. If you can't find the answer on boards then it doesn't exist. According to this thread:
    For example 'Mot' is/was Dublin slang for 'Girlfriend', but it originally was a Victorian slang word for vagina, and survived as a word in Dublin after it was long forgotten in London.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 41,926 ✭✭✭✭_blank_


    Is the "t" ever pronounced though?

    More like "Moh" really.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,911 ✭✭✭bradlente


    meh


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  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Music Moderators Posts: 14,316 CMod ✭✭✭✭The Master


    It's from the irish "maith an cailin" meaning good girl or best girl.

    For example you would tell someone you were going out with your "maith an cailin" meaning you're going out with your best girl, ie your "maith"


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 22,819 ✭✭✭✭g'em


    The Master wrote: »
    It's from the irish "maith an cailin" meaning good girl or best girl.

    For example you would tell someone you were going out with your "maith an cailin" meaning you're going out with your best girl, ie your "maith"

    I much prefer the explanation I found. I can live up to being a vagina. Good girl not so much.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,382 ✭✭✭Duffy the Vampire Slayer


    It seems to be a uniquely Dublin phrase. It hasn't started to spread into other areas of the country like 'gaff' has.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,033 ✭✭✭Ficheall


    MidlandsM wrote: »
    Often wondered why some men refer to their Girlfriend as their Moth. And how did this name come about, like most girlfriends don't resemble the chiefly nocturnal insect related to butterflies?

    It's short for "your mother".


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,383 ✭✭✭emeraldstar


    MidlandsM wrote: »
    Often wondered why some men refer to their Girlfriend as their Moth. And how did this name come about, like most girlfriends don't resemble the chiefly nocturnal insect related to butterflies?

    Is it just a Dublin Thing?
    Moth? Jeez OP, at least get it right if you're gonna devote an entire thread to it :eek:


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 5,737 ✭✭✭MidlandsM


    Moth? Jeez OP, at least get it right if you're gonna devote an entire thread to it :eek:

    WTF are you on about? Devote? Its a feckin question on an internet forum......:rolleyes:


  • Registered Users Posts: 523 ✭✭✭Lauder


    The Master wrote: »
    It's from the irish "maith an cailin" meaning good girl or best girl.

    For example you would tell someone you were going out with your "maith an cailin" meaning you're going out with your best girl, ie your "maith"

    No its not. It's still heard commonly enough in the East end, so obviously not from the Irish 'maith'.

    Have come across the Victorian 'vaginal' slang explanation before so seems correct.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,543 ✭✭✭JerryHandbag


    FatherLen wrote: »
    my gf is a moth.... she likes lightbulbs and long walks on the beach.

    I think I saw her in a film once with Richard Gere


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,514 ✭✭✭PseudoFamous


    It seems to be a uniquely Dublin phrase. It hasn't started to spread into other areas of the country like 'gaff' has.
    I've heard it said in both Arklow and Dundalk lately.. The accents did not help at all. Maybe you can expect to hear it in the West in another ninety odd years.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 17,918 ✭✭✭✭orourkeda


    I've heard it said in both Arklow and Dundalk lately.. The accents did not help at all. Maybe you can expect to hear it in the West in another ninety odd years.

    They're still waiting on the wheel, fire and electricity.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 27,252 ✭✭✭✭stovelid


    It's mot?


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,246 ✭✭✭✭Dyr


    le bon mot

    "maith an cailín" just doesn't work


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,383 ✭✭✭emeraldstar


    MidlandsM wrote: »
    WTF are you on about? Devote? Its a feckin question on an internet forum......:rolleyes:
    Ha. Get thee to a dictionary.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 5,737 ✭✭✭MidlandsM


    Ha. Get thee to a dictionary.

    get yourself a life.;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,383 ✭✭✭emeraldstar


    Got one thanks, and it's pretty great :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 27,252 ✭✭✭✭stovelid


    Lauder wrote: »
    No its not. It's still heard commonly enough in the East end, so obviously not from the Irish 'maith'.

    Maybe it was the Irish that brought it to London?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,850 ✭✭✭Cianos


    stovelid wrote: »
    Maybe it was the Irish that brought it to London?

    Like they did with New Yorkers saying "You dig?"...from the Irish immigrants saying "An dtuigeann tú?", from what I've heard.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,296 ✭✭✭Frank Black


    The word derives from the Persian ‘mojaath’, which was a word used to describe a mythical monster that could suck the will to live out of even the strongest warrior.
    The word was later adapted to mean ‘girlfriend’ or ‘significant other’.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 17,918 ✭✭✭✭orourkeda


    The word derives from the Persian ‘mojaath’, which was a word used to describe a mythical monster that could suck the will to live out of even the strongest warrior.
    The word was later adapted to mean ‘girlfriend’ or ‘significant other’.

    She can suck the strength out of me anytime.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 226 ✭✭McNulty737


    always thought it sounded ridiculous. stupid dubs.


This discussion has been closed.
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