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Should religion be taught in schools?

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  • 01-07-2011 5:01pm
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 273 ✭✭


    I have a big problem with this, and believe it is destroying childrens minds early on in life. Just today I am reading in the newspaper we have a huge shortage of science/maths/technology skilled people in this country. Here's my theory of 1 of the reasons why:

    Does this start in childhood? I went to a catholic school and was taught all the christian bullsh1t, for example - you can't tell children in 1 class "Jesus walked on water" then in the next class teach them the scientific properties of water and expect them to understand it properly. Or that "Jesus turned a small amount of loaves/fishes into enough to feed thousands", then expect them not to be confused when being taught food science. One more example (I could list many more) , is resurrection. You can't teach children that magical resurrection after being dead for 3 days is possible, then expect them to properly understand biology. God putting man on earth, then expecting them to understand genetics, evolution, cells, etc.

    Some will argue "oh those stories are just symbolic" - that is bullsh1t. There is no reference card indicating which parts of the bible are to be interpreted as fact, and which as symbolic. Why not just stamp it out altogether, stick to the facts and let them decide on a faith when they are adults , if they want to instead of it being rammed down their throats. These are young, innocent, highly impressionable children. Others will argue that they should be taught about all faiths like is being done for junior cert religion now, but again I find this nonsensical. If I make up a religion tomorrow, praising leprechaun ghosts- should that be taught about too? Where do you draw the line?

    Should religion be taught to children? 155 votes

    Yes
    0% 1 vote
    No
    99% 154 votes


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Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 22,479 ✭✭✭✭philologos


    Here we go again :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,017 ✭✭✭Crow92


    I think religion should be taught in school, world religion, informative information on the beliefs of all the major religions of the world, not focusing on raising you as a catholic but teaching you above all different religions.


  • Posts: 24,714 [Deleted User]


    Tehachapi wrote: »
    Rabble rabble rabble

    Go away.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 273 ✭✭Tehachapi


    Crow92 wrote: »
    I think religion should be taught in school, world religion, informative information on the beliefs of all the major religions of the world, not focusing on raising you as a catholic but teaching you above all different religions.

    Why? Why not use that time/resources to teach them something beneficial to society like biology or physics? Should my leprechaun ghost religion be included on that course also?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,327 ✭✭✭Sykk


    ...


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,017 ✭✭✭Crow92


    Tehachapi wrote: »
    Why? Why not use that time/resources to teach them something beneficial to society like biology or physics? Should my leprechaun ghost religion be included on that course also?

    Whats not usefull about not being ignorant to what others believe?
    Integrated society?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,564 ✭✭✭Naikon


    No.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,327 ✭✭✭Sykk


    Tehachapi wrote: »
    I have a big problem with this, and believe it is destroying childrens minds early on in life. Just today I am reading in the newspaper we have a huge shortage of science/maths/technology skilled people in this country. Here's my theory of 1 of the reasons why:

    Does this start in childhood? I went to a catholic school and was taught all the christian bullsh1t, for example - you can't tell children in 1 class "Jesus walked on water" then in the next class teach them the scientific properties of water and expect them to understand it properly. Or that "Jesus turned a small amount of loaves/fishes into enough to feed thousands", then expect them not to be confused when being taught food science. One more example (I could list many more) , is resurrection. You can't teach children that magical resurrection after being dead for 3 days is possible, then expect them to properly understand biology. God putting man on earth, then expecting them to understand genetics, evolution, cells, etc.

    Some will argue "oh those stories are just symbolic" - that is bullsh1t. There is no reference card indicating which parts of the bible are to be interpreted as fact, and which as symbolic. Why not just stamp it out altogether, stick to the facts and let them decide on a faith when they are adults , if they want to instead of it being rammed down their throats. These are young, innocent, highly impressionable children. Others will argue that they should be taught about all faiths like is being done for junior cert religion now, but again I find this nonsensical. If I make up a religion tomorrow, praising leprechaun ghosts- should that be taught about too? Where do you draw the line?

    Your theory is fail. Don't blame catholicism for your poor career choice. This isn't the 1800's


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,053 ✭✭✭Aldebaran


    Sykk wrote: »

    ...


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 273 ✭✭Tehachapi


    Sykk wrote: »
    Your theory is fail. Don't blame catholicism for your poor career choice. This isn't the 1800's

    What? I actually work in IT.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,041 ✭✭✭Seachmall


    Should we learn about religion? Obviously.

    Should we be taught which is the right one? No, that's for your parents to do.
    Sykk wrote:
    Don't blame catholicism for your poor career choice.
    Tehachapi wrote:
    I actually work in IT.
    Point proven.


    [I work in IT too, btw]


  • Registered Users Posts: 520 ✭✭✭dpe


    History of religion, yes (how religion has informed culture and human development is a valid subject). Religion as indoctrination, no.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 22,479 ✭✭✭✭philologos


    Tehachapi wrote: »
    I have a big problem with this, and believe it is destroying childrens minds early on in life. Just today I am reading in the newspaper we have a huge shortage of science/maths/technology skilled people in this country. Here's my theory of 1 of the reasons why:

    OP: I'm a computer science graduate who will be starting a post as a software engineer at the end of August. I'm a Christian.

    Your reason is bunk I'm afraid :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 207 ✭✭Sweatynutsack


    Religion is the very issue that has the world the way it is today !!
    So no, if people/children want to learn about religion they should do it of their own accord imo


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 273 ✭✭Tehachapi


    dpe wrote: »
    History of religion, yes (how religion has informed culture and human development is a valid subject). Religion as indoctrination, no.

    That's an interesting point, is religion still taught as indoctrination in Ireland to primary school children?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 19,986 ✭✭✭✭mikemac


    Teach basics and history of all religions.
    The children can make up their own minds at a later age.

    If the family want to take it further the local parish can run Sunday school or classes in the evenings.
    Making communion and confirmation for a primary school child making them "soldiers of Christ" when they have no clue what that means is nothing but indoctrination

    To be honest all religions are more or less the same
    If we "did onto others as we would have them do unto us" the world would be a far better place.


  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 35,078 Mod ✭✭✭✭AlmightyCushion


    I learned all that religion stuff in school and I have a pretty good understanding of maths and science, same with a lot of my friends. I haven't pursued a career in that area though as I didn't want to not because religious teachings made me stupid.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 273 ✭✭Tehachapi


    Seachmall wrote: »
    Point proven.


    [I work in IT too, btw]

    How is it a poor career choice then? Because the shortage of people in the industry means we are more in demand? Maybe temporarily, but for the long term future of the career it is beneficial to have too many skilled people than too few.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,747 ✭✭✭✭wes


    Tehachapi wrote: »
    Here's my theory of 1 of the reasons why:

    Interesting theory, but without any facts to back it up, its one that will be quickly rejected. There are many other possible reasons why we have a lack of qualified candidates in those area's, and I can think of several easily, which are just as valid as yours, seeing as both would have no proof. Without getting more information on why this has happened, we can't draw any reasonable conclusions, without more facts.

    So, I reckon your your theory should be rejected due to lack of any facts, to link Religion classes to the lack of qualified candidates in the sciences.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 20,759 ✭✭✭✭dlofnep


    No, unless it's a class which discusses religion, rather than promoting religion.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,806 ✭✭✭D1stant


    No. Not before secondary anyway - and only as part of a sense of humour development programme

    In Finland The primary kids do formal study from 9 until 13:00 then the afternoons are all sport and Physical Education. Thats a system I like.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,041 ✭✭✭Seachmall


    Tehachapi wrote: »
    Just today I am reading in the newspaper we have a huge shortage of science/maths/technology skilled people in this country. Here's my theory of 1 of the reasons why:

    I'm an atheist however my uncle was a principal of a secondary school, has a doctorate in education and learning, played in European Chess Tournaments (and reach a final when he was 19), lectures in the Open University and has co-authored books on education used to teach teachers all around the world. He is the most devout Christian I know aside from my parish priest.

    Contrary to popular opinion religious people aren't inevitably stupid.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,069 ✭✭✭✭My name is URL


    If religion was any good it wouldn't need to be taught or indoctrinated into children. I don't think it should be a subject in school.. maybe teach about the history of theism or something like that instead.. or how about a class on critical thinking.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 273 ✭✭Tehachapi


    philologos wrote: »
    OP: I'm a computer science graduate who will be starting a post as a software engineer at the end of August. I'm a Christian.

    Your reason is bunk I'm afraid :)

    Because a single religious person works in the area of IT? The vast majority of my friends/colleagues working in the areas of IT/pharma/biology are non-religious. I think you'll find the same when you begin your career.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,041 ✭✭✭Seachmall


    Tehachapi wrote: »
    How is it a poor career choice then? Because the shortage of people in the industry means we are more in demand? Maybe temporarily, but for the long term future of the career it is beneficial to have too many skilled people than too few.

    Twas a Joke :pac:


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 19,986 ✭✭✭✭mikemac


    Turn it off and turn it on again

    That IT degree came in very useful on the helpdesk ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,221 ✭✭✭Greentopia


    Tehachapi wrote: »
    I have a big problem with this, and believe it is destroying childrens minds early on in life. Just today I am reading in the newspaper we have a huge shortage of science/maths/technology skilled people in this country. Here's my theory of 1 of the reasons why:

    Does this start in childhood? I went to a catholic school and was taught all the christian bullsh1t, for example - you can't tell children in 1 class "Jesus walked on water" then in the next class teach them the scientific properties of water and expect them to understand it properly. Or that "Jesus turned a small amount of loaves/fishes into enough to feed thousands", then expect them not to be confused when being taught food science. One more example (I could list many more) , is resurrection. You can't teach children that magical resurrection after being dead for 3 days is possible, then expect them to properly understand biology. God putting man on earth, then expecting them to understand genetics, evolution, cells, etc.

    Some will argue "oh those stories are just symbolic" - that is bullsh1t. There is no reference card indicating which parts of the bible are to be interpreted as fact, and which as symbolic. Why not just stamp it out altogether, stick to the facts and let them decide on a faith when they are adults , if they want to instead of it being rammed down their throats. These are young, innocent, highly impressionable children. Others will argue that they should be taught about all faiths like is being done for junior cert religion now, but again I find this nonsensical. If I make up a religion tomorrow, praising leprechaun ghosts- should that be taught about too? Where do you draw the line?

    Yes.
    :pac:

    Oh sorry, you wanted a real answer??

    Comparative religion class where all main world religions are taught along with critical thinking skills, yes.
    One religion taught for indoctrination purposes and to the exclusion of all others, no.

    NEXT!!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,564 ✭✭✭Naikon


    Lads - if god talks to me, I need help. If I talk to god, i'm A OK:cool:


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 273 ✭✭Tehachapi


    Seachmall wrote: »
    Contrary to popular opinion religious people aren't inevitably stupid.

    That's not the point I'm trying to make, obviously there will be some religious people who are quite successful in their career and life - such as your uncle. I'm talking more about the long-term damage of teaching hundreds of millions of children stuff that is clearly false (resurrection, walking on water, creationism, etc) and confuses their minds.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 19,986 ✭✭✭✭mikemac


    Greentopia wrote: »

    Comparative religion class where all main world religions are taught, yes.
    One religion taught for indoctrination purposes and to the exclusion of all others, no.

    +1
    Are there schools in Ireland which do this?


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