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Weight training

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  • 30-06-2011 7:04pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,391 ✭✭✭


    Any experts here??

    What age is it ok to start light weight training?

    There are different ages said everywhere.
    My son is 14...but very tall and very broad and has started to do small weights.... It seems all his mates are doing it to.

    We (couple of the mums) rang a few places and got... he'll be grand once hes not a small child....another NO WAY not till hes 18.....another 16 for starting with very very light weights.

    Anyone know?:confused:


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 983 ✭✭✭Frogdog


    While not an expert by any means, from my own experience and knowledge, there are no downsides to starting lifting weights at a young age, only positives.

    I'm 28 now, and have only been lifting weights for the last few years, but wish I had been doing it since a young age.

    And if I ever have children of my own some day please God, I'll buy them a junior weights set or beginner's bar before I'll buy them a football.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,614 ✭✭✭BadCharlie


    In china they start them lifting weights at 10years and younger. These young kids have growing up and dominate weightlifting worldwide.

    I think its fine, but prob be good for your son to have a trainer to show him how to lift weights the correct way.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 295 ✭✭john t


    Not an expert but i think 14 a bit young mayb wait till later teen`s 17 when he is more developed in body/ bones etc, too young starting could bring joint problems as he get older, ask your gp he/ she will say he is still growing and not developed yet too use resistance trainning. Better he play sports like most 14yr olds and build strenght and muscle naturally tiill he is 17/ adult...My view again not expert ..


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,818 ✭✭✭Inspector Coptoor


    there is no age too young or too old to train with resistance or weights.,

    that resistance could (and in many cases should just) be your own bodyweight, progressing on to light weights and progressing from there.

    the most important point for lifting any kind of "weight", be it your own body or free weights etc, is that you are lifting it correctly and safely.

    If form and technique are correct and the load is appropriate, weight training is one of the best things anyone, male or female can do for long term health


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,818 ✭✭✭Inspector Coptoor


    john t wrote: »
    Not an expert but i think 14 a bit young mayb wait till later teen`s 17 when he is more developed in body/ bones etc, too young starting could bring joint problems as he get older, ask your gp he/ she will say he is still growing and not developed yet too use resistance trainning. Better he play sports like most 14yr olds and build strenght and muscle naturally tiill he is 17/ adult...My view again not expert ..

    sorry but all this is completely and utterly wrong


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 21,981 ✭✭✭✭Hanley


    john t wrote: »
    Not an expert but i think 14 a bit young mayb wait till later teen`s 17 when he is more developed in body/ bones etc, too young starting could bring joint problems as he get older, ask your gp he/ she will say he is still growing and not developed yet too use resistance trainning. Better he play sports like most 14yr olds and build strenght and muscle naturally tiill he is 17/ adult...My view again not expert ..

    Your view is uninformed, ignorant and incorrect.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 21,981 ✭✭✭✭Hanley


    there is no age too young or too old to train with resistance or weights.,

    that resistance could (and in many cases should just) be your own bodyweight, progressing on to light weights and progressing from there.

    the most important point for lifting any kind of "weight", be it your own body or free weights etc, is that you are lifting it correctly and safely.

    If form and technique are correct and the load is appropriate, weight training is one of the best things anyone, male or female can do for long term health

    This.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 295 ✭✭john t


    Justask / op , wanted too know opinions i gave my opinion as a non expert. Let op choose what best for her child. Allow her read any advice and make her mind up as a parent....


  • Registered Users Posts: 39,346 ✭✭✭✭Mellor


    john t wrote: »
    Justask / op , wanted too know opinions i gave my opinion as a non expert. Let op choose what best for her child. Allow her read any advice and make her mind up as a parent....
    The OP asked a question and was looking for the correct answer. Not an uninformed opinion.

    Your opinion was wrong. It's that simple. He won't risk joint problems, if anything light resistance work now will improve his bone and joint strength. As long as its done correctly.


  • Registered Users Posts: 108 ✭✭Reggy


    john t wrote: »
    Justask / op , wanted too know opinions i gave my opinion as a non expert. Let op choose what best for her child. Allow her read any advice and make her mind up as a parent....

    why dispense advice if you are not an expert when the OP specifically asked - "any experts here"?

    As regards the OP, Liam Henners257 has it spot on:
    that resistance could (and in many cases should just) be your own bodyweight, progressing on to light weights and progressing from there.

    Several government bodies have advocated the use of resistance training for strengthening joints and improving bone structure in young children. same goes for impact activities like jumping etc... the idea that lifting weights stunts growth is rubbish.

    All I know is, I wish I had started resistance training before my mid/late teens...


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  • Registered Users Posts: 194 ✭✭hsbc


    If they start young they'll be able to build up their 100kg rep max for the NFL combine in college!


  • Registered Users Posts: 175 ✭✭pachey100


    I started lifting at 15 and have had no adverse effects. Its good to heir about young lads getting into something other than xbox/pc games.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,391 ✭✭✭Justask


    Thanks a million everyone.

    I really appreciate.

    Hes nearly 6 foot and weighs nearly ten stone, He does also play football, training 3 days a week. so hes doing the normal things a 14 year old does as someone pointed out.

    Thanks again for the help. :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 328 ✭✭Justin1982


    Your son can benefit a lot from weight training from an early age.

    Lifting weights will improve his strength, body shape and posture as he continues to grow up if he does it right. It will not stunt or impede his growth! This seems to be something that a lot of parents might think when they hear their son or daughter is starting to lift weights.
    Other benefits of lifting weights are improved mental health/discipline, improved confidence and general health/happiness/well being.
    And it will not turn him into a dumb meathead either! Another misconception! Its what you do or dont do outside of the gym that determines whether your dumb or not.

    The same rule applies to him as to any person, of any age, who starts lifting weights. You need to know what your doing and you need to use perfect form when performing lifting exercises to ensure he doesnt injure himself. Is he going to a gym? If so then make sure the instructors teach him correct form and ok his programme.

    You might suggest to him that he do a programme recommended by a professional, learn and practise correct form for each exercise and he should probably learn about proper nutrition.

    There is a lot of people out there who have been lifting since they were 14/15/16. I know a number of people who lifted heavy weights since they were in their teens and a few years later they have developed a lot better than other teens who sit around doing nothing all day.

    The only people I know of that lifting weights can be a problem for are people who have some underlying medical condition. Obviously if someone has a known/unknown heart condition, then they should consult their doctor before starting to lift weights on a regular basis.


  • Registered Users Posts: 779 ✭✭✭papajimsmooth


    They dont think it be like it is but it do


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,668 ✭✭✭marathonic


    soniya wrote: »
    Consistency is much require when you do <snip> bodybuilding exercises [/snip]. This is not happening when you do exercise for two days and take rests of two days and after that again start some exercise for some more days. A consistency is must require. Exercise regular rather for 15 minutes in a day. If you start doing exercise with consistency, then try some more effort in exercise. Always motivate yourself and put your self in some challenging position. An exercise is called exercise when your heart rate and breathing rate will increase and should sweat.

    If this post is trying to promote your blog, I highly doubt it will work. I'm almost tearing my hair out after simply reading the above few lines. :D


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