Advertisement
Boards are fundraising to help the people of Ukraine via the Red Cross at this horrific time. Please donate and share if you can, you will find the link here. Many thanks.

Questions on becoming a counsellor, psychotherapist, or psychologist

13

Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,660 G86


    G86,

    I went to an open night for DBS and the lecturer there told me that they were aware that most people studying the HDip in psychology part-time were also working full-time. She said that she was sure the workload was manageable for someone in full-time employment.

    However a lecturer from the college is obviously going to sugar coat things. I've also heard that the part-time course is very tough going and it's a worrying thought. I'd be interested to hear more on this from other people.

    Thanks for that. I worked a 30hour week alongside my full time degree so 'manageable' sounds do-able :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,754 Odysseus


    G86 wrote: »
    Thanks for that. I worked a 30hour week alongside my full time degree so 'manageable' sounds do-able :)

    I studied in DBS many moons ago I was doing the BA in Psychoanalytic Studies, but we shared some subjects with the psychology students, we also studied with the part-time student as even though we where day students, we also had some evening classes, which of course we in turn shared with the part time students.

    As you said some people found it tough but everbody got through. I have find this myself when I study now, as I'm in full time employment as well as doing extra work such as a small amount of lecturing. All I would say to someone thinking of working and studying is go for, but get yourself into a routine around studying as this is the hard part when you work and study.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,900 crotalus667


    Odysseus wrote: »
    I hope this helps a bit.
    It did ,Thanks for taking the time to post :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,518 krankykitty


    I did the 4 year part time BA in DBS (counselling/psychotherapy) while working full time, usually well over 40 hours a week. I managed it - but it was tough. There was times when I wanted to pack it all in. You do get through it though. I also found the personal work/therapy part to be at times emotionally tiring which added to the general workload!

    EDIT - I meant to point out - in the part time course I did, there were several options of "splitting" a year so you take on a reduced workload over a longer time. Usually it was an option even if you got to Christmas and felt you couldn't manage to continue, you could keep some of the modules for the following year. It worked out good for people who had unexpected life events happen, for example.

    As Odysseus pointed out a big part of getting through a course while working/parenting/living full time also is to ensure you have a good routine. Do up a calendar type thing to keep track of when all your assignments are due, and I found slotting a bit of study here and there in "dead" time helped - i.e. while commuting, lunchbreaks etc.

    To the poster who felt daunted at starting studying at 28 - in my own course there were people of all ages right up to the 60s who were just starting out. It's daunting all right but there's usually great support to be found from the others in the same boat.

    Best of luck to all embarking on the various courses/trainings!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,660 G86


    Odysseus wrote: »
    I studied in DBS many moons ago I was doing the BA in Psychoanalytic Studies, but we shared some subjects with the psychology students, we also studied with the part-time student as even though we where day students, we also had some evening classes, which of course we in turn shared with the part time students.

    As you said some people found it tough but everbody got through. I have find this myself when I study now, as I'm in full time employment as well as doing extra work such as a small amount of lecturing. All I would say to someone thinking of working and studying is go for, but get yourself into a routine around studying as this is the hard part when you work and study.

    Thanks for that, financially I'm looking at at least the 2012 or 2013 academic year before I can start, but I figure I'll still only be 26/27 then so it's not THAT late..

    I'm currently involved in an adolescant mentoring scheme, and I'm interested in the child protection/family services side of things; although I'd like to have the option of private counselling also. In the meantime, I'm looking into doing some voluntary work with teenline, do you think this would help with my application? To be honest, I'm quite skeptical of the helpline support, as I've always thought that it should only be trained counsellors providing that service.

    Also with regards to the hDip, I'm in two minds about whether the Counselling and Psychotherapy option might be better for me. I personally wouldn't feel happy with providing private counselling without a Masters, so I was looking at doing the hDip in Psychology and then a Masters in Psychotherapy. Do you think I'm making things harder for myself this way though? I just wouldn't expect someone to put their health in the hands of 2 years of education, and I know I definitely wouldn't feel comfortable with it considering that there are counsellors/therapists out there with 10+ years of study behind them.

    Sorry for all the questions and thanks again :)


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 578 stuf


    @G86 - the HDip Counselling and Psychotherapy and MA Psychotherapy at DBS are two parts of a 4 year programme - I don't think entry to the MA Psychotherapy is possible from HDip Psychology. I've done the Hdip C&P and it contains a lot of practical training but not client work. Some of the group work and personal therapy requirements of the HDip are prerequisites of the MA and you don't get this from a straight psychology qualification.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,861 ✭✭✭ JuliusCaesar


    EVERYBODY: I'm tidying up this long and unwieldy thread, as there are a LOT of repeat questions. If you have a question, please do a search of this thread first to see if it hasn't been answered already within the last year or so. I do know that courses/colleges change. And please try not to use long quotes unless absolutely necessary. Just quote the bit to which you are replying.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1 GQComm


    Hi all

    I really enjoyed your info on the conversion courses in psychology.

    Recently, I've been considering looking at a career in psychology as it's always been a dream of mine.

    My life however has led me down the business path, which has been very successful but I thinks it's time for a change.

    The question i have is whether there is a way to study psychology without having to go back to doing a degree again. (I currently hold a BSc in Management TCD and Advanced dip in Marketing DIT)

    Is there a way to do a diploma and get credit for my degree?

    Any insight would be much appreciated, I've been trawling the internet but your discussion is the most informative so far.

    Thanks
    GQ


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,754 Odysseus


    GQComm wrote: »
    Hi all

    I really enjoyed your info on the conversion courses in psychology.

    Recently, I've been considering looking at a career in psychology as it's always been a dream of mine.

    My life however has led me down the business path, which has been very successful but I thinks it's time for a change.

    The question i have is whether there is a way to study psychology without having to go back to doing a degree again. (I currently hold a BSc in Management TCD and Advanced dip in Marketing DIT)

    Is there a way to do a diploma and get credit for my degree?

    Any insight would be much appreciated, I've been trawling the internet but your discussion is the most informative so far.

    Thanks
    GQ


    Firstly, welcome to the psych forum. You don't mention which area of psychology you would like to work/study in. In order to work as a psychologist in any capacity you need to study it at post-grad level. As you know in order to study anything at post grad you need an under-grad foundation.

    So really your choices are doing another degree or doing a H-Dip, which will then allow you to study a specific area of psychology at post-grad level. They are the only real answers to your question. Which area of psychology are you interested in?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3 Conor001


    There are excellent carriers opportunities in the field of psychologists, People have been complaining about stress and tension problems related to professional and personal life so there is a huge demand for psychologists. The salaries for psychologists are also very good.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 4,861 ✭✭✭ JuliusCaesar


    GQComm wrote: »
    Hi all

    I really enjoyed your info on the conversion courses in psychology.

    Recently, I've been considering looking at a career in psychology as it's always been a dream of mine.

    My life however has led me down the business path, which has been very successful but I thinks it's time for a change.

    The question i have is whether there is a way to study psychology without having to go back to doing a degree again. (I currently hold a BSc in Management TCD and Advanced dip in Marketing DIT)

    Is there a way to do a diploma and get credit for my degree?

    Any insight would be much appreciated, I've been trawling the internet but your discussion is the most informative so far.

    Thanks
    GQ

    Hello, this sounds a little familiar, as does this.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,861 ✭✭✭ JuliusCaesar


    Conor001 wrote: »
    There are excellent carriers opportunities in the field of psychologists, People have been complaining about stress and tension problems related to professional and personal life so there is a huge demand for psychologists. The salaries for psychologists are also very good.

    ?? There's a huge demand to become counsellors and psychotherapists, but generally psychologists are employed by the HSE and other such organisations. It's really difficult to get into Clinical Psychology; it's hard to get into Counselling Psychology; I don't know about opportunities for Occupational or Educational Psychologists. The popularity of the subject has made the points go really high even for a degree in the subject.

    The salaries of Clin Psychs are good - but most of them will have spent their 20s poor as church mice, trying to gain experience as volunteers; and not all of them get into Clin Psych and end up giving up.

    At the moment, I wouldn't recommend it as a career to anyone starting out unless you've wealthy parents OR are really sure that this is the price you are willing to pay. Having said that, I generally wouldn't recommend a counselling course WITHOUT a degree in psychology.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1 Phatoss


    Hi everyone, not sure if a similar question to this has been asked. Have looked and can't see so here goes.

    Was just wondering if anyone knows just how strict the clinical or counselling psychology courses in Ireland are about the academic requirements (ie 2.1 minimum)? I've a list of courses in the UK that accept a 2.2 plus performance to 2.1 standard at Masters level, so I was wondering if anyone knows what the Irish courses say about it?

    The reason I'm asking is because I have a 2.2 BA in English and Psych Studies, graduate diploma with GBR and Masters with distinction. I've also got three years' work experience with an NHS CAMHS service, six months of which is as an assistant psychologist (with another 12 months until my contract is up), plus one year's voluntary work with adults with severe & enduring mental health problems. I'm going to apply for the course this year so was wondering if anyone here knows what the universities say about the 2.1 vs 2.2 with MSc issue and whether it's worth my while applying to the Irish courses? I've been away from home for about 5 years so I'd love to come back to do my training!

    Many thanks for your help.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 20 ✭✭✭ U R Soul


    Has anyone here taken the Open University route? They offer a psychology degree.

    Its something I'm considering doing. The flexibility might suit me better. Suprised no one here has mentioned it. Is there a reason for that?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4 CeliaS


    At the moment, I wouldn't recommend it as a career to anyone starting out unless you've wealthy parents OR are really sure that this is the price you are willing to pay.

    :( Gosh. This thread has kinda disheartened me. I'm 20, currently going into the third year of my BA in Applied Psych in UCC and have been thinking of what route to take since I'll be applying for postgrads in the next few months. I've gotten a 1.1 both years so far and (without meaning to sound arrogant - I just love what I study) I expect to score pretty similarly in my last year.

    I'm currently pretty split between a) branching into neuroscience or neuropharmacology (which would essentially be research or industry work eventually I guess) or b) pursuing a clinical degree. I have no illusions that getting into clinical will be tough and require a big effort on my part, a lot of tears, loans and possibly several other degrees in the interim, but having read some of the responses to this thread, I must say I'm pretty scared.

    Is the outlook really that bleak? I'm a hard worker but I don't have even vaguely wealthy parents :o Would I be smarter to head into the hard sciences/research or should I stick it out and try the clinical route? I understand that what I should do is to "do what I love" but hell I just love psychology in general - but I think I may love financial stability more!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1 SonJStallworth


    In my opinion the best way to get a job in the field of psychotherapy is to train as a clinical psychologist. A Masters of Social Work or an M.A. in psychology can teach you basic counselling skills if you pick the appropriate courses, and might get you a counselling job. However the psychologist training, besides the greater depth that it provides, has the advantage of admitting you to a regulated profession in which there is some attempt to match the number of people graduating to the amount of work available.

    Another option if you would like to be self-employed without needing to worry about marketing and the availability of work is to become a medical doctor. This can lead to being a GP psychotherapist or a psychiatrist. However most of the training you will get is in medicine, which is essential if you are dealing with physical problems such as dementia, but less relevant for doing psychotherapy.


  • Registered Users Posts: 361 ✭✭ sadie9


    I would say it is always worth applying for something you want to do - even if you only got a 2.2 and it says 2.1 or higher.
    Your experience, age, previous academic records etc might stand to you. Eg. someone aged 32 with a 2.2, but who has experience and has shown ability to study etc might be accepted along with the 21yr old who has just graduated from their BA with a 1st but no experience.

    It is up to the discretion of the decision-makers on the course who they accept, so its worth putting in the effort of applying. The courses always advertise for Firsts, or 2.1s or higher. I got on a Masters with 'only' a 2.2 when it said 2.1 or higher. I sent a letter when I applied saying why I really, really, really wanted it.
    Some of these Masters courses can be needing your fee money to keep themselves in jobs (specially in recession Ireland), so don't forget that important aspect. So they may well drop their admission policies in light of the reality - you get the course you obviously want and they get to keep their course funded for another year.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 44 ✭✭✭ dumdiddle


    I am in leaving cert now and i am thinking of doing psychology next year in college which will last 4 years and then go on to do educational pychology for another 2 years, would i be fully qualified then at 24 years old? Im really confused because there seems to be so many steps to become fully qualified! can anybody tell me if i would be qualified in 6 years?

    and also do you really have to get a degree in primary school teaching to become an educational psychologist? would that mean i would have to do 8 years in college.....if its true i really think i will forget about doing psychology altogether


  • Registered Users Posts: 107 ✭✭ Chicke


    I'm 40 years if age with two small kids. I stopped working five years ago as an accountant as I hated it although I am very good at it and want to do something now for the rest of my working life that will make a contribution,will get me employment and I will find fulfilling.
    Since my tme with my kiddies I have been more and more drawn to either educational or in general dealing with kiddies(would I have to be a clinical psychologist?)
    To be honest,I want to pursue education that for the moment is flexible around the kids so I believe that would be distance education.
    I have a degree already in business so I know I can do a conversion hdip

    Can I do this this conversion hdip through an online course?
    What abbot after that.
    How hard is it to get into educational psychology?can I do a masters online somewhere?
    Thanks a mill


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,327 ✭✭✭ hotspur


    Chicke wrote: »
    I'm 40 years if age with two small kids. I stopped working five years ago as an accountant as I hated it although I am very good at it and want to do something now for the rest of my working life that will make a contribution,will get me employment and I will find fulfilling.
    Since my tme with my kiddies I have been more and more drawn to either educational or in general dealing with kiddies(would I have to be a clinical psychologist?)
    To be honest,I want to pursue education that for the moment is flexible around the kids so I believe that would be distance education.
    I have a degree already in business so I know I can do a conversion hdip

    Can I do this this conversion hdip through an online course?
    What abbot after that.
    How hard is it to get into educational psychology?can I do a masters online somewhere?
    Thanks a mill

    Hi Chicke. I do not believe that there currently exists a distance education H.Dip in psychology. The Open University used to have one but I think all their post-grad psychology programmes are on hold atm.

    It depends where you live but there are part-time H.Dip options, including night-time e.g. DBS in Dublin.

    For a distance undergraduate psychology degree there is always the OU. There is also the option of Oscail run by DCU. They run a humanities or arts BA in which one can do 6 modules in psychology. Now this is not accredited by the Psychological Society of Ireland but DCU suggest that it might do to get accreditation with the British Psychological Society. Ordinarily those accredited with BPS can get accredited as a graduate member by the PSI but I do not know if that is possible based on the fact that you would have done an Irish degree that is not recognised by the PSI. You would have to do some investigating.

    I can't say much about educational psychology, but it has been discussed numerous times here before if you search. Unless I am mistaken you will not be able to do that by distance education, unlikely to be able to do it part-time, and I think things are shifting towards it being a doctorate level qualification.

    I'm not sure what your goal is, but there is also the psychotherapy route with a latter specialisation in child therapy if that is your thing. There are innumerable part-time options with this route e.g. 1 afternoon a week or 1 weekend a month etc.


  • Advertisement
  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1 psycheddave


    First of all, thanks everyone who posted here for creating such an informative thread.

    My experience in psychology is limited to reading and viewing youtube lectures, including Introduction to Psychology courses at Yale and Berkley and a Sociology Course at Berkley. I am now reading Human Behaviour and I would like a career that combines helping people on a one to one level, with research, writing and theory. As a first step, I am considering the City Colleges diploma in CBT in Dublin, because it is an area in which I am interested and I can fit it in before hopefully starting a post grad or masters in September.

    Has anyone here had any experience of this course or college? It doesn't seem to be recognised by the PSI, does this matter?

    Thanks,


  • Registered Users Posts: 107 ✭✭ Chicke


    Thanks a mill hotspur


  • Registered Users Posts: 751 ✭✭✭ Musefan


    Hi, I wonder if anyone could recommend a diploma/certificate course or two that I could do during my degree. I am in final year at the minute but my timetable is quite flexible and allows me a few evenings a week to play with. They should be with a view to supplementing an application for a clinical doctorate in the future. Thanks!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7 ✭✭✭ parlare


    Hello, unfortunately, I can not recommend you such courses but a can propose you to read some useful books about psychology. for example -the encyclopedia of psychology, which contains nearly all the spheres of this science.
    for example:
    http://reslib.com/book/Handbook_of_Psychology__Vol__1__History_of_Psychology#1

    http://reslib.com/book/Handbook_of_Psychology__Personality_and_Social_Psychology__Vol__5

    if your special interest is in particular sphere, tell me please, what is this.


  • Registered Users Posts: 751 ✭✭✭ Musefan


    Hi Parlare,

    Thank you for the book recommendations. I might not have made myself quite clear, in that I am already a Psychology student and I regularly read many psychology text books (I will have a look at the ones you have recommended-thank you!) but I am hoping to enhance my CV through supplemental courses in things like CBT, Counseling, ABA etc.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7 ✭✭✭ parlare


    Thank you! I am very glad to help you even by advice! where are you a student? which part of psychology you are most interested in?
    I gave you two examples from the free scientific library, which I read from time to time, - the are a lot of psychology (and other sciences) free books in English. for me I have found Brian Tracey "speak to win" and some interesting books about workplace and family psychology))


  • Registered Users Posts: 289 ✭✭ EGOSHEA


    Advertisement deleted, poster contacted.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,861 ✭✭✭ JuliusCaesar


    I'm locking this thread as it seems that people aren't reading it for information first and we're answering the same questions over and over. PLEASE READ THIS THREAD FIRST, BEFORE POSING YOUR QUESTION. JC


  • Registered Users Posts: 48 Famous Blue Raincoat


    Is there any reason why Laya Healthcare, for instance, will not cover counsellors who are registered by any body other the PSI? They are ultra strict about this. [https://www.psychologicalsociety.ie/pd/?pd_s=&pd_d=]

    Are PSI-accredited people more qualified? There really is a small pool of people on the PSI list, and many seemingly capable people (or at least capable self-promoters on their own websites) are not covered. However, as Laya give 50% back on 8 visits, it's a financial incentive to only find a PSI-accredited counsellor

    Indeed, one person was recommended to me and she claimed to be accredited with the PSI. However, when I checked the PSI-accredited list, she was not on it. It seems to be the Wild West with qualification claims by "counsellors". The fact that the PSI is charging c. €300 per annum to record people as accredited to them further undermines things.

    It would do Irish consumers a great service if we could separate all the Mickey Mouse-qualified "counsellors" with a 6-week or 6-month or even 2-year qualification, no matter how "empathetic" or well meaning they might perceive themselves to be, from the people with a 4-year Hons degree or PhD. The absence of any sort of grading system undermines confidence.



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 4,861 ✭✭✭ JuliusCaesar


    There's a big difference between counsellors and Psychologists.

    Yes, psychologists are more qualified. They had an undergrad degree in psychology plus at the very least a Masters in a particular area of psychology, often doctorates, depending on their area of specialisation.

    Small pool of Counselling/Clinical psychologists? Last time I looked there seemed to be hundreds.

    The charge of €300 for membership with PSI covers the cost of the admin employees, and the newletter. PSI also provides resources for training. And an annual conference. And gets involved in policy and advocacy. We actually get quite a bit back from the Society for that fee.

    Apparently, CORU will sort out all the problems of education/qualification/accreditation for counsellors and psychotherapists, including psychologists who work in those fields. See Statutory Regulation thread.

    And unfortunately, insurance companies made decisions on the grounds of profitability, rather than any benefit to the person... supposedly CORU will make it easier for them to decide who they'll fund treatment by.



Advertisement