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Read this before asking "What to expect from [subject/course]?" ALL COURSE INFO HERE!

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  • Effluo wrote: »
    I'd say if you struggled to pass ordinary maths then you'll struggle with economics.

    It's a subject which is based quite a bit around numbers and graphs and if you don't like a bit of algebra, geometry or arithmetic then you prob won't like economics...
    Yeah that's what I thought. I should be fine so. I'm going to pick economics. Fascinating subject.




  • anybody doing economics and finance?




  • a good idea. welcome to the land of stickiness...




  • I'll do an engineering one if anyone is interested.




  • Has anyone done accounting and finance?


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  • I'd appreciate it if anyone could do English, Sociology or Anthropology;)




  • Anthropology - The comparative study of human culture. Year one = a bit of a doss, but interesting. Easy to pass, so they chuck you in the deep end in 2nd year. Essays left, right and centre, twice the length of the essays from the previous year. Range of different modules to choose from, the fieldwork is a bit iffy, you NEED to put the work in and find time to go and meet people etc.

    I can't say anything about the 3rd year yet.

    Sociology - Heavy focus on the 'classics', Durkheim, Weber and Marx. Study of Society, can you apply old theories to modern society? Also a good range of topics, this year (2nd) I studied topics as far apart as farmers and popular music. I don't really know what to say unless you've got specific questions.




  • Any info for the Mathematics course. The Double one.




  • Some Music and Physics info would be savage - I know there are a few Music students who are on here!




  • Sociology
    Really enjoyed sociology (except the theory modules, they're rotten). It's not as easy as everyone says though. Hard to pick up marks as you really have to know what you're talking s**** about.:)
    Tips on lecturers:
    1. Be sure to pick any module given by Colin Coulter, he's really good!
    2. Tony Cunningham is seriously boring zzzz and says "iiiiin terms of" before everything and "riiiiight" after everything. Would never sit in another lecture of his...ever!
    3. Michel Peillon marks exams verrrrrry easy ;)

    English
    LOVED English. Def recommend it! Very diverse modules and choices after first year, i.e film! All the lecturers are really nice and very fair.
    Ide Corley is the nicest lecturer ever! It really helps when your lecturers are nice!


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  • I just finished an english degree :D:D and I have to say it was a really good course, caters for everyone and anyone!covers all aspects of literature and language in 1st year which is really good and gives you a good grasp of the subject, I especially loved the poetry covered in 1st year, Conrad Brunstrom is a hilarious lecturer!
    2nd year gets a bit more in depth and gets a little bit harder, romanticism was one the hardest ,modules I had 2 take and anyone I spoke to found it hard.....dreaded the exam but surprisingly it was the best mark I got that year and everyone else was the same!
    3rd year covers a bit more of the theory behind literature and language which at times can be a bit boring but there's also the interesting and funny times like where sinead kennedy basically told the class she was a marxist lol!word of advice do your research seminar with seamus mc ghabhann, he's so nice and gives you all the help you could ever need and is quite a generous marker!:cool:

    its a really gud course and I would definitely recommend it, its a lot of work and involves a lot of reading but its worth it in the end!I loved it so much I'm going back to do a masters......very excited!!:D:D
    there's a module descriptor tingy on the department page of the nuim site which will tell you al u need to know bout each individual module......and if your a really prepared person (unlike myself) the english department usually put up an advanced reading list near the middle of August!




  • I just finished an english degree :D:D and I have to say it was a really good course, caters for everyone and anyone!covers all aspects of literature and language in 1st year which is really good and gives you a good grasp of the subject, I especially loved the poetry covered in 1st year, Conrad Brunstrom is a hilarious lecturer!
    2nd year gets a bit more in depth and gets a little bit harder, romanticism was one the hardest ,modules I had 2 take and anyone I spoke to found it hard.....dreaded the exam but surprisingly it was the best mark I got that year and everyone else was the same!
    3rd year covers a bit more of the theory behind literature and language which at times can be a bit boring but there's also the interesting and funny times like where sinead kennedy basically told the class she was a marxist lol!word of advice do your research seminar with seamus mc ghabhann, he's so nice and gives you all the help you could ever need and is quite a generous marker!:cool:

    its a really gud course and I would definitely recommend it, its a lot of work and involves a lot of reading but its worth it in the end!I loved it so much I'm going back to do a masters......very excited!!:D:D
    there's a module descriptor tingy on the department page of the nuim site which will tell you al u need to know bout each individual module......and if your a really prepared person (unlike myself) the english department usually put up an advanced reading list near the middle of August!

    that's all the old course, I'm just finished second year and it was nothing like your description... oh and seamus mcgabhann is retiring, this was his last year lecturing unfortunatley... thanks anyway




  • help!
    i think i want to do psychology in arts but whats it like??




  • that's all the old course, I'm just finished second year and it was nothing like your description... oh and seamus mcgabhann is retiring, this was his last year lecturing unfortunatley... thanks anyway

    How was second year? I'm entering into it now and wondering how the workload compares to first year?

    Seamus is finished?! Shame that, probably my favourite lecturer. The man knows stuff, hidden depths there, if you see what I'm saying? He was a legend. Was really hoping to have him again next year.




  • that's all the old course, I'm just finished second year and it was nothing like your description... oh and seamus mcgabhann is retiring, this was his last year lecturing unfortunatley... thanks anyway

    How was second year? I'm entering into it now and wondering how the workload compares to first year?

    Seamus is finished?! Shame that, probably my favourite lecturer. The man knows stuff, hidden depths there, if you see what I'm saying? He was a legend. Was really hoping to have him again next year.




  • Nah he's definatley retiring, in EN255 in second semester, everyone's divided up into seminar groups and he told his seminar group that this was his last year, there was a notice on moodle about it aswell (dunno if first years got it) but he was a fantastic lecturer.

    Anyway, second year is interesting, that's the easiest way to put it. There can be as much or as little work as you decide involved, a large majority of the modules in both semesters need a good bit of back up material read, and you have to go and do that yourself. You really need to read the back up material and do your own work to get a decent pass grade, and yeah, there's a good bit of work. 2 Essays per semester, and you need to keep on top of everything, it's hell trying to catch up before exams.

    First Semester:
    EN251: World Literature I: Was taught by Conrad and Íde, covers alot of the material relating to outsiders, colonialism, exploration and the discovery and acceptance of new cultures and new worlds, texts included The Tempest, Oroonoko, Rasselas, Jane Eyre... a few others that I can't think of either. I wasn't crazy about this course, it was a bit dull, kinda the same points being repeated over and over again, but I missed a few of the lectures and got completley lost and when I came back, I kinda lost interest.
    ***Lesson Learned:
    GO to the lectures. With all the work and reading you have to do, it's just easier to go to the lecture instead of trying to figure out what went on when you're trying to do your essay 4 months later.
    EN252: Renaissance and Restoration: Was taught by Stephen O'Neill and Conrad. I loooved this course. Basically the Elizabethen period and what happened after. It's so interesting both from a literature and historical point of view, and the course is taught fantastically. READ THE SECONDARY MATERIAL, it's difficult to understand the history and the overall politics of the era without reading the secondary material.
    EN253: Romanticism and Enlightenment: One of my favourite modules from first and second year, taught by Jim Kelly and Conrad (yeah you've Conrad basically all first semester), loved loved loved it. Alot of it based on poetry, and Conrad's half concentrated on texts of the Enlightenment period. Go to the lectures, the powerpoints are useless the night before the exam, the notes Jim and Conrad give are fantastic.

    EN254: Irish Studies I: Brilliant module although the Joyce lecturers were torture, I don't like Joyce and there were very detailed lectures on A Portrait of The Artist... Colin Graham is a star and his lecturers are brilliant (def. go because he doesnt put notes on powerpoint), Oona Frawley is great with her section on Yeats aswell.
    EN255: Critical Theory and Research I: This was the seminar module. It's based on feminist criticism, and you read texts like A Room Of One's Own and De Beauvoir's The Second Sex, then ye get put into groups after the midterm specialising in certain areas. I'll elaborate more on this if you want, but basically it's about doing your own work and research and being supervised/guided by your seminar leader.
    EN256: Victorianism to Modernism: Brilliant course, loads of poetry, Emer Nolan's lectures on Dracula were great, do the secondary reading it's so so important for this module.


    Phew. Any other question I'll be happy to answer.




  • Brilliant, thanks a million!




  • How was second year? I'm entering into it now and wondering how the workload compares to first year?

    Seamus is finished?! Shame that, probably my favourite lecturer. The man knows stuff, hidden depths there, if you see what I'm saying? He was a legend. Was really hoping to have him again next year.


    Legend he was, giving us all those hints for semester one exams was savage. He spoke incredibly slow though. You could take his notes down word for word without a problem. Not taking English next year though, wasn't mad on it and there was too much work involved, bleugh.



    Anyone got any info and second year French and Geography? C'mon, spill the beans!




  • Hey! :)

    Whats History like in first year?




  • This may be a bit of a stupid question but I was on Nuim site and they have put up a guide to first-year English and it states that "Wuthering Heights", "Pride and Prejudice", "The Dubliners" and "Kim" are the texts that are going to be used in the Fiction module.. just wondering if usually you are required to study extra texts on top of the set ones?


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  • just wondering if usually you are required to study extra texts on top of the set ones?

    No, not extra texts as such, but secondary material, critical essays, commentaries, supporting material by the original author, sometimes a few pages of a work that influenced/was influenced by the text, if a film adaption was made, the lecturer will usually guide you to the best one eg. The 1992 Coppolla version of Dracula is the recommended film to watch in relation to the text. Theory books, and works of philosophy and psychology can also be brought into your secondary material too.

    Studying, using and understanding secondary material, as a rule, is the pivotal action that brings you from barely a pass grade to an actual pass grade and above. You very, very rarely will get good marks for giving just your opinion on a text and describing it like you did in secondary school.




  • Has anybody any info on 3rd year accounting & finance????:):):)

    And anybody doing the masters in accounting any tips on what it's like, what to expect, how you applied etc????????




  • Anyone got any info and second year French and Geography? C'mon, spill the beans!

    2nd Year Geography:

    Personally liked it a lot more than first year. You can pick your own modules to suit your interests, I went down the Human Geography route, and it's brilliantly broad. The modules I did were:

    Development Geography - Looking at various economic development models used in various places since the early 20th century until the modern day. Was way more interesting than I make it sound. Excellent lecturer too. A hell of a lot of reading though, but a nice small class size.

    Cultural Geography - Basically looked at various themes e.g. racism, gender, sexuality with relation to all things cultural. A bit waffely, but if you don't mind that then it's all good. Nice, helpful lecturer.

    Social Geography - Similar to Cultural Geography in the themes, but more difficult to waffle in as pretty much everything you say has to be related back to relevant theory. Very interesting though, raises a lot of questions, gets you to think about ideas that are often taken for granted. Lecturer really knew her stuff too.

    Economic Geography - Looked at various production systems (e.g. Fordism etc) and the structural models of corporations and things like tourism and such. Although economics is not at all required as a prerequisite, I wouldn't go for it if one wasn't at least interested in economics. I.e. not really a filler subject.

    Methods 1 & 2 (Compulsory) - The bane of my existence for second year. Through a combination of computer and non-computer classes students are basically "herded" through these modules. Kind of like skills in first year, but more projects and more herding. No room for independence or individual style. If you do everything exactly as they ask, and write more than they ask you'll do well, that's what I began to learn towards the end of the year.

    That's about it really. Hope it's of use.




  • No, not extra texts as such, but secondary material, critical essays, commentaries, supporting material by the original author, sometimes a few pages of a work that influenced/was influenced by the text, if a film adaption was made, the lecturer will usually guide you to the best one eg. The 1992 Coppolla version of Dracula is the recommended film to watch in relation to the text. Theory books, and works of philosophy and psychology can also be brought into your secondary material too.

    Studying, using and understanding secondary material, as a rule, is the pivotal action that brings you from barely a pass grade to an actual pass grade and above. You very, very rarely will get good marks for giving just your opinion on a text and describing it like you did in secondary school.

    Thanks. Great that's just what I was hoping would be the case :). Now to go read "Dubliners" and "Kim"..




  • This may be a bit of a stupid question but I was on Nuim site and they have put up a guide to first-year English and it states that "Wuthering Heights", "Pride and Prejudice", "The Dubliners" and "Kim" are the texts that are going to be used in the Fiction module.. just wondering if usually you are required to study extra texts on top of the set ones?

    Hey I was looking at the website but I can't find anything! Do you know if thats just for English on its own or as part of an arts degree too?...:)




  • Hey I was looking at the website but I can't find anything! Do you know if thats just for English on its own or as part of an arts degree too?...:)

    http://english.nuim.ie/ That's where I got info under "Information for First Year..." :) I'm doing it as an arts degree. I figure the arts degree and single degree are pretty similar so they probably involve the same texts but I'm not sure :)




  • heading in2 1st yr doing PSYCHOLOGY THROUGH SCIENCE..... missed out on straight psychology so doin it dis way..... dont mind science subjects did biollgy for leaving n liked it bt maths im average.................jst wondering will i manage??




  • Apparently maths is do able even if you've only got ordinary level maths from leaving cert. Depends how much work you're willing to put in. :)




  • Am starting politics this year .anyone any info on what first year is like?


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  • Any idea how big the classes are in economics and finance?

    Most important, of course, is not that the classes are small, but that people have the good manner to shut up during lectures. If anyone has any experience, please share.


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