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Race report thread

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  • tunguska wrote: »
    I dont want to get into a row with the BHAA lads but my actual time was 32:52 not 32:57. So really it was 3 seconds quicker. But I take your point. The national 10k was the goal race, this was a bonus. I should've ran it more aggressively, but I stuck with a lad from rathfarnham when I should've psuhed on. Whats more he outkicked me in the last 200m.......but its like the cowboy said in the big lebowski, some days you get the bear and other days, well dude, the bear gets you.

    Everyone I've spoken to that did this race said their times were down by at least 5 seconds, mine including. Must have been some mix up with the chip start, maybe all that "moving back" at the start put it out!




  • pconn062 wrote: »
    Everyone I've spoken to that did this race said their times were down by at least 5 seconds, mine including. Must have been some mix up with the chip start, maybe all that "moving back" at the start put it out!

    I was involved in a race where there was some technical issues with the pacer's Garmin :rolleyes: long story short, both pacer's chip times were out because the chips activated as they were so close to the start mat.




  • Mr Slow wrote: »
    I was involved in a race where there was some technical issues with the pacer's Garmin :rolleyes: long story short, both pacer's chip times were out because the chips activated as they were so close to the start mat.

    Yeah think the problem could have been that everyone lined up about twenty feet past the start line and they had to pull us all back which could have fecked up the chip. I don't really mind 5 seconds normally but if you ran 39:58 and your chip time said 40:03 you would be a bit annoyed! :pac:




  • Seeing as this is the race report thread, I'll throw in the latest chapter in my novel for insomniacs...

    Usual caveat for a CL race report– if you’re reading during work, you may need to put in for annual leave…etc etc… wink.gif

    I fell out of bed bright and early on Saturday morning to go for my pre-race mile. (Aside: a few months ago, early on a Saturday morning, I went for a run. That afternoon, during his weekly trip to Base2Race, Digdig purchased a new pair of runners. When he got home, I accompanied him on an easy run to try them out. During this, I noticed that my legs felt considerably better than they had during my earlier run, which got me thinking about the merits of waking up the legs before heading out for a run in general. Now, obviously I’m not going to get up every morning and run a slow mile to warm up the legs for a later run (though it might be an idea…), but I decided that it might be worthwhile to do on the morning of a shorter race. The first time I did it was before Raheny in January, and I had a great race. Since then (and I’ve only run a handful of races) it’s become my lucky charm. It may sound foolish, and it may all be in my head, but I’ll most likely continue to live in my la-la land preaching the amazing powers of a ten minute mile to start the day… Until the day it doesn’t work, no doubt!)

    So, with my 10 minute mile out of the way, I had a good stretch and a not so good few minutes on the roller. Ate my breakfast a good 2.5 hours before the race was due to start. I’m grand running the slow miles after eating these days, but the stomach does not hold up so well with the faster stuff so I’m still a bit nervous about that.

    As we hit the road, I got into my usual pre-race ‘I HATE running. I HATE races. This is going to be an unqualified DISASTER’ mood. Suffice to say, I am not good company before a goal race… Registration was painless and we had plenty of time to settle down for some people watching. Digger pointed out that I always act strange in the pre-race setting – and he’s right – when I’m hanging around registration tables and start lines, I feel like an impostor. I don’t feel like I belong or that I deserve to line up alongside actual talented athletes. It’s strange because although I don’t class myself as an ‘athlete’, I know I can run – I can’t explain it. After some chilling to try to shake the nerves and demons, I was able to engage in some relatively sociable conversation with Meno, Belcarra, The Boy Wonder and Belcarra. My concern regarding my nerves was not alleviated by talk of the pain on the horizon i.e. it would kick in quickly and last for the duration. I knew that this was not going to be pretty. With about 15 minutes to go, I did a short warm up with some strides, dumped my hoodie and headed to the start line.

    I was under instructions not to start too far back but I was still aware of knowing my place and started a couple of rows behind Ray who I expected to be a good few minutes ahead of me. There was a bit of shuffling around at the start line and then we were off. It was pretty congested for the first km and I had to dodge a lot of people to settle into my own pace and path. As I’ve said, I had no plan. McMillan had predicted 42:33 based on my recent 5k time. I knew that to finish between 42-43 minutes, my pace would have to be between 6:45 and 6:55. I had hoped that I would be able to do this but really didn’t know whether I could. My first mile was far too fast c.6:30 and signalled the beginning of the pain. I tried to not look at my watch and just kept trucking. At the 3k mark, I made about 5 metres on a girl who had been just ahead of me. She landed right beside me within a matter of minutes, and side by side is where we stayed for the next 4k. It was a silent battle, neither of us wanting or willing to let up. Whilst we were fighting with each other, we were also keeping each other going.

    At around the 4k mark, I could feel a stitch coming on and really had to focus on my breathing to fight it. It had started to get quite warm at this stage too, and I was very much concentrating on working hard – there was no room for complacency and this race wasn’t going to be successful without an effort. At the 5k mark, I passed Digs roaring support – I was wrecked. The urge to give up was pretty strong. Then I passed Meno who had dropped out due to a dodgy stomach. I considered that the guys would be worried that seeing Meno at this point could have a negative impact on me if I was struggling. It did. I wanted to give up and stop. I wanted to ease back to 9 minute miles and enjoy the scenery. What did I want out of a 10k race anyway? I had no time in mind. It wasn’t going to change my life. Ah crap, I couldn’t come back to my log with a DNF. I couldn’t come back with another 10k blow-up after all of you guys telling me that I had a good time in me. This internal struggle got me through to about 7k. At this stage, I started to fall off the pace of my opposition and she kicked on inch by inch.

    My stitch had developed into a whole load of piercing painful knots in my entire core which prevented me from going faster despite my legs and lungs feeling relatively ok. I was forcing myself to breath, focus on my footfall, count sheep, count the steps of the man in green shorts in front of me, name the brands of runners people were wearing, name the colours of the flowers on the side of the road, identify every shade of green around me – literally anything and everything to keep my mind from acknowledging the pain my body was feeling. The pace was dropping – but not at a frightful rate – more an expected one! The plan had shifted from maintaining a pace to finish between 42-43 minutes, to “just get another 500m at sub-7 pace under your belt and then you can ease off… And another. And another.” I got a sharp belt of stitch-pain around the 8.5k mark and let out a bit of a squeak. I was just about able to let the lady beside me know that I was ok in response to her concern, and then it was back in the zone.

    When I saw the 9k marker, I knew the pain would soon be over. I managed to pick it up here by shortening my stride and keeping the legs turning. I started passing a few people which was a nice change in comparison to the previous 2k. As I came back through the gate with just over 500m to go I knew I just had to dig. I knew the pain was written all over my face and I knew that’s the way it should have been. For once, I thought ‘that’s it; I have given everything to this course’.

    The final 50metres were less of the usual joyous ‘yaay, there’s the finish line’, and more ‘sweet Jesus, one more step and I’m nearly done, one more step, one more step…keep going, nearly there, ouch ouch ouch… catch that person, stay with that person, beat that person…why is this taking so long, am I really going to run 42:xx… I think I’m crying tears of blood, are my legs even moving anymore, I think I’m flying…’

    I crossed the line in 42:29 by Garmin though the official result is 42:32 – either way, I’m delighted. As I said it’s a 12 minute PB in a race that almost had no ending (quite a few times!) At the very least, this race proved that I am far more stubborn and focused and capable than I give myself credit for. I haven’t forgotten the pain; yet in a sadistic way I’m looking forward to the next one.

    I think my finish line picture sums it up pretty well – I finally managed to perfect the painful grimace after Spagbol‘s disgust with the huge grin I was sporting crossing the finish line in Connemara.

    The post-race feed was awesome! Suffice to say I took advantage… Haha.

    This was a fantastic race – 10 horrendously painful kilometres in a lovely scenic setting, with a great crowd, all facilitated by wonderful organisation – and my first of many BHAA events I suspect!




  • pconn062 wrote: »
    Yeah think the problem could have been that everyone lined up about twenty feet past the start line and they had to pull us all back which could have fecked up the chip.

    There was no mat at the start line in the K Club, just a finish mat...
    If everyone is 3 seconds slow, maybe they started the clock late?
    (I didn't stop my watch on the line so I can't compare, and I'm not bothered)


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  • Congrats and as always a fantastic read!!! i felt your pain right throughout that report....:D




  • RayCun wrote: »
    There was no mat at the start line in the K Club, just a finish mat...
    If everyone is 3 seconds slow, maybe they started the clock late?
    (I didn't stop my watch on the line so I can't compare, and I'm not bothered)

    Ah right that could be it alright. Not really bothered myself either but I can understand for lads like tunguska at the sharp end of the race where PB's can come down to a matter of seconds, could be a bit irritating.




  • claralara wrote: »


    I crossed the line in 42:29 by Garmin though the official result is 42:32 – either way, I’m delighted. As I said it’s a 12 minute PB in a race that almost had no ending (quite a few times!) At the very least, this race proved that I am far more stubborn and focused and capable than I give myself credit for. I haven’t forgotten the pain; yet in a sadistic way I’m looking forward to the next one.

    Only 12 minutes? I think you need to get the finger out and stop taking it so handy..........Great running. Did you wear the club vest after all? You've only started formal training sessions so you should give dunshaughlin 10k a whack at the end of june, I reckon you could take lumps out of 42minutes, even in the space of 2 months.




  • tunguska wrote: »
    Only 12 minutes? I think you need to get the finger out and stop taking it so handy..........Great running. Did you wear the club vest after all? You've only started formal training sessions so you should give dunshaughlin 10k a whack at the end of june, I reckon you could take lumps out of 42minutes, even in the space of 2 months.

    Haha! I can almost taste the discipline slipping away.

    Dunshaughlin is in the rough plan alright... I don't know about lumps though. Although the legs felt good for a run on Sunday and alright during tonight's club session. Maybe just a little lump. :rolleyes:




  • My time was down 12 seconds. I crossed the matt at 45:15 on their clock not my watch, but gave 45:27.

    So still some teething problems with their system, but in fairness it was a great day out so dont cre.


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  • The marathon Gods were smiling down on Limerick yesterday as we stood around waiting for the off, it was nice and cool but there was a promise of some heat from the clear blue sky. We lined up beside the People's Park and as the clock struck 9, we were off.

    I was a bit worried about the amount of long distance training I had done in the lead up to this, recurring fatigue since DCM has hampered my training and I'm currently running to stand still, my biggest fear was that I'd be unable to keep people going towards the end and just march home silently to the finish, my fears were unfounded.

    The first few miles ticked away nicely, the only problem I had was trying to affix my balloon to my gel strap on my arm and it took me most of mile 2 to get it sorted, once I had, I started chatting to people and here the fun began, people were in high spirits, the good weather and the promise of smashin and setting pb's had everyone charged up.

    The first few markers raised alarm bells and this continued to be the theme for most of the race, myself, Runningcoach and Oisin1178 chatted away about everything and anything. Just after the 8 mile marker we passed Gary Kirwan making his way up towards UL and he looked like a man suffering, he came in after 11 hours in the end so a bad day at the office for him. We ran through the beautiful grounds of UL and out through Rhebogue where an old man was offering cups of water that he was filling from an old cooking pot, it was a lovely gesture on his part. Back into the City and we ran down Parnell st and over the halfway mark which shock horror was in the correct spot but we had over a minute in the bank at this stage and rather than let it go we decided not to risk it just incase the second half was long. Out into the countryside next where Dev 123 became the human pillar of salt, it started to warm up here and we started grabbing and carrying extra bottles of water for people and passing them out to those who started coming back to us from faster groups, I handed one to a girl outside Paddy Punches and I may aswell have floated down from heaven and given her the winning Lotto ticket for the reaction (while subdued due to fatigue and dehydration) I got. Onto the hill leading into O'Connell Avenue and our group broke in half, there was nothing to be done, no shouting was getting them up that hill and we had to press on. on through the city and as we approached running under Sarfield Bridge, some sniper running up ahead skipped the loop by heading up the steps onto the bridge above and fooling nobody but himself. Here I hit a flat spot and it was so flat I thought the wheels were about to come off, I popped a gel and prayed that it would do it's magicand get me back in shape for the hills that were coming. Thankfully it did and by the time we hit Thomond Park I was feeling good again and back talking people up for the big finish, loads of people were on hand by Ivan's and Lidl handing out jellies and I grabbed fistfuls and passed them out to very grateful pacees. We had about 5 left at this stage and I had confidence 2 would make it on time, around onto the North Circular by my old school and the leader of the Half came by hardly touching the ground, Oisin1178 was told to get out of the way as the half followers appeared and he rightly told the clown where to go.

    The home stretch was great, we gathered a few who had gone out too fast and just kept them ticking over, one chap was suffering and I told him all he had to do was get across the bridge and the crowd would get him home, once we did I started roaring for the crowd to cheer the '4's and they did in fine style. We crossed the line in 3:58:23 happy out.

    We were asked recently in the pacer's forum why do we pace and after yesterday the answer is simple, we help take people's minds off of their pain and get them to the Finish line and their gratitude is overwhelming. Below is an email I received from the pharmacist at my local chemist.
    Congrats on bringing the 4hr runners home in perfect time! With 2 mins to spare i believe from the big clock above the finish line!!! Was there cheering you on as you turned o connell street,looked thou you had only ran 2.6miles! Thanks for bringing my brother home,he set off with the 3.45 marker but followed you for the last few miles. He finished at 4.00.32 and was thrilled. He said to say thanks for bringing him home. Thanks from me too. Brendan

    Thanks to Oisin1178 for the entertainment and Runningcoach for putting me in the line up, I'm first in the queue for next year.




  • So, after a miserable drive to Cork in drizzly driving conditions I had resigned myself to a soaking, albeit in cooler and more conducive conditions to running than the recent heat wave but as I was ‘just trotting around’ I was determined to enjoy myself.
    I hadn’t been feeling 100% in the week leading up to the race but had been progressing nicely and felt human on race morning when myself and a mate made our way down for breakfast at 7am shielding our eyes from the blistering sunshine that had appeared from nowhere, a quick pop outside and the signs were that it was going to be warm, really warm.
    At the Start line I met up with Jcsmum and her team of supporters, a quick trip to join and hastily abandon the portaloo queue and we were off, the first few miles whizzed by but I was aware of any slight drag through my breathing and with confirmation from the HR monitor that I wasn’t imagining it I knew there were going to be a few tough miles ahead. At 6 miles I stopped for a bathroom break behind a perfectly placed wall on the Glanmire Rd and had gotten into a rhythm by the time we entered the Jack Lynch tunnel, out the far side I chatted with one of the 3:45 pacers who had run with me in Limerick on a training run and the miles started to fly by. At about 12 miles my hamstrings were tired, very tired but I persisted with chatting to everyone around me to take my mind off of it and it did, the Estuary was lovely and with some merciful cloud cover I was steeling my resolve for a solid finish. We went through halfway with 40 secs in hand and the next few miles came and went without issue.
    Onto the ‘hilly’ section and by 19 miles I was feeling it, the legs were running out of steam and the road ahead wasn’t getting any shorter, Mile 21 and I had fallen back from the pacers, my race buddy was powering ahead and I was considering my first DNF. Mile 22 and some teenage angel presented me with a banana which I ate over the next mile and by the Carrigrohane Road, I was feeling much better and had managed to join up with the pacers again, feeling strong and chatting away, this didn’t last long as a vicious stomach muscle cramp took hold, relieved by walking and antagonised by running, I tried digging my fingers in to ease it to no avail and shuffled along with 20 secs walking and 2 minutes running. Just as I was feeling my worst (Mile 25) Peter Mooney pops up with a big salute and a quickly snapped a few shots of my absolute misery. I had told my wife what time to expect me and knew if she saw the balloons pass and no sign of me she’d be worried, my goal now was to shorten the amount of time she was concerned as much as possible. The cramp obliged at this point and I dug in, gritting my teeth and growling as I turned onto the bridge at mile 26, a few seconds later and I spot my race buddy catching up in time for us to simultaneously cross the line in 3:45:36.
    Great day out all told smile.gif and good craic with the gang in the pub afterwards.
    The moral of the story children is that miles in the legs will get you so far, if you haven’t trained for a marathon it will sting like a b1tch. My only hope is that the 2 marathons I have done in the last month will help with my endurance and not set me back further.
    Garmin Link




  • Cork City Marathon

    To be honest when the thoughts of running a marathon first entered my head it was reading the race reports from experienced (and first time) marathon runners on the boards that really made up my mind for me that this was something to pursue so in writing this I want to first thank all those who have gone before me and wrote a race report. Hopefully this report will inspire others to make the commitment to completing a marathon.

    My log wasn’t the most uptodate to hopefully the race report will make up for it………

    So where do I start, I suppose on Sunday when I collected my bib and timing chip in Cork city hall, unfortunately I was one of the last to collect a bib so missed out on a tshirt as they had run out. My name and bib number was taken and I was promised the tshirt will be sent out, normally I wouldn’t mind if I got one or not but as this was my first (and possibly last??) I really hope I get a tshirt sent out. My wife and I were booked into the River Lee Hotel, a handy stroll to the start line and we got there about 6.30 Sunday night. I had the last remnants of my pasta dinner in a lunchbox and I ate the rest of it cold before we went for a walk so my wife could get a proper bite to eat. As I played a lot of field sports I never considered myself the most athletic of players so I always took preparation seriously, and this carried on to the weekend, I ate so much pasta that If I never touch it again it’ll be too soon.

    Sunday morning, sun splitting the rocks, packed my gels into my belt and grabbed my ipod and off to the start, nerves were not too bad and I saw a few people doing small jogs down one of the lanes beside Patricks Street. I decided to copy them and do a few stretches before thinking you have 26.2 miles ahead of you, plenty of chance to get warmed up in the first mile or two, so I went back to the start and leant myself against a wall and tried to relax. I met up with a work colleague who had decided to do the marathon as a training run for Gaelforce north. He said the 3:45 would be a good pace for him so we decided to keep each other company for as long as we could. First couple of miles went off without a hitch, jumping up and down onto the paths and making sure I didn’t lose sight of the 3:45 balloons. There is a great sense of occasion and you really feel you are part of something bigger than your own personnel goal of running that marathon when you see the crowds cheering each and every runner ‘I’m not alone, all of us are in this together’. To see all the runners, young and old, men and women, fantastic.



    The first mile went off well, I think the pacers were a little hot on the pace cos I clocked the first mile at about 8:07 (3:45 pace – approx 8:35). If I am to criticise them for that mistake I will criticise them no more they did a fantastic job of pacing throughout. Out passed the Silver Springs hotel and I found my rhythm. I was happy with the pace as some of my LSRs were about this pace and felt really comfortable as we started to spread out heading to the Jack Lynch tunnel. Into the tunnel and an almighty roar went up from all involved. I remember a poster saying stick to the shortest route so I hugged the racing line (bollards) in the hope of saving my legs from any unnecessary extra metres over the 26.2. Onto mile 8 and 9 and my work colleague and I were going along fine. I spotted one poor guy in blue having trouble at approx Mile 9 (sideswipe was that you?). At this stage I still felt fine and we went a little ahead of the pacers. On past the half marathon runners who were waiting to start and out around the blackrock castle (sorry my Cork Geography isn’t the best!). The route was very scenic here and we passed the halfway mark, I was a little ahead of the 3:45 pacers and felt strong at this stage.


    Miles 14 and 15 went by without a hitch, I think this is where the my first timer inexperience took hold of me. My work colleague was struggling and i didn’t feel too bad so decided to push on. I began thinking of catching a glimpse of the 3:30s in front of me (madness!!) could I break 3:40 (again madness!!). I decided to put my head down and miles 16-19 I felt really strong and thought I had pushed up the pace. At 19 I began to feel it and there was a little climb up to a flyover (again sorry about the geography). At this stage I thought I best look behind me to see if there was any sign of the 3:45. Oh no!!!!! they were just 20 yards behind me, how the hell did that happen, I thought I had just put in my fastest three miles?

    Suffice the say they were up beside me before too long, I struggle to keep pace with them and downed a few jelly and another drink, I was glad of the next water station where cooling down was my main priority. Mile 21, still with them, now I’m concentrating on the feet in front of me, almost hypnotised by their movements, keep them in sight and you’ll be ok. Mile 22, really beginning to hurt, still the feet, keep looking at the feet. Somewhere around the beginning of the Carrigoline Road, and I couldn’t keep up. A lucoazade sport stop was a welcome relief as I turned for home, spotting the towering River lee hotel in the distance, oh how I longed for an ice bath in my room on the 4th floor. I glanced down and then looked at the hotel again….wait a minute, it seemed a lot closer the last time I looked up. Ok head down and keep going. Past poor some guy getting oxygen on the side of the road, hoped he was ok and then pictured myself being the next one on the side of the road. I hope the chap was ok.

    The final surge of sugar from the lucozade sports and the sight of my number 1 supporter (my wife) at mile 24 gave me one last spurge of energy, I began to close on the 3:45s again with the balloons in sight ahead of me. Once I hit 25 I knew I would make it, 3:35 on the watch, 10 minutes to get home for 3:45, ok you have done this tons of times around bushy park, tymon park, you can do 1.2 miles in 10 minutes…….just….turned for Patricks Street to a wonderous reception from the Cork faithful, 3:45:25, 25 secs out, I didn’t care. To run the full way was my first goal, to get under 4 hours my second and to get 3:45 was my third. Its open to interpretation but I am saying I got 3/3. My first half was 1 minute faster than my second half, would love another pop at Dublin and maybe a crack at 3:30……wife expecting late September……hmmmm, watch this space.




  • Mr Slow wrote: »
    The moral of the story children is that miles in the legs will get you so far, if you haven’t trained for a marathon it will sting like a b1tch. My only hope is that the 2 marathons I have done in the last month will help with my endurance and not set me back further.
    Garmin Link

    After reading your report I thought your splits would be all over the shop near the end, but they were solid. I mean one 9 minute mile out of 26 isnt too shaby.
    I haven't had a chance to read your log so I dont know what your training was like for this marathon, but are you saying that you ran plenty of miles but not so much at Marathon pace or above?




  • tunguska wrote: »
    After reading your report I thought your splits would be all over the shop near the end, but they were solid. I mean one 9 minute mile out of 26 isnt too shaby.
    I haven't had a chance to read your log so I dont know what your training was like for this marathon, but are you saying that you ran plenty of miles but not so much at Marathon pace or above?

    I ran 3:29 in DCM 2011, my current 10k pb is 41:14. I've run almost 800 miles this year so far but the longest distances I've run include a handful of 12/13's, a 16, a 20, paced 4 hours for Limerick then ran 100 miles for the rest of May so short story long, I hadn't enough long runs done.:)




  • Man v Horse

    Yesterday I did the Man V Horse Marathon in Llanwrtyd Wells in Wales. Was a couple of hours drive into the middle of the valleys and in awful weather with heavy rain and very strong winds. Made for some fun when trying to put up the tent on the towns cricket pitch, but once done was straight off to the Neuadd Arms pub for some carb loading. The previous Neuadd Arms landlord being the person who came up with the idea of the Man V Horse event. On the way though we got sight of the river that I’d have to run through in the last couple of hundred meters of the final leg I was due to run. Seems that lots of rain falling turns a small river into a big fast moving river so there was no way we were going to be running through this half a mile further up stream:

    7173695435_187f35964c.jpg

    Thankfully the next day the weather was dry, the sun even came out later, they had moved the start back by an hour (which was handy as we got a bit carried away in the pub) and they had changed the course to go over a bridge rather than through the river. That did add an extra mile to the end of my leg though.
    The relay changeover point being off in the middle of nowhere the guy doing our second leg had to get ferried off by bus to that point half an hour before the start of the actual race which was right outside the Neuadd Arms pub. They set of the runners first and then about 15 minutes later the horses start, seemed to be delayed a little as they tried to marshal all the crowds out of the road and get the traffic stopped.

    Video of the human start.
    Video of the equine start.

    Think there was about 300 plus individual runners entered, 80 relay teams and 50 horses. They kept the horses behind that 4x4 just to keep them under control going through the streets and junction, then it drives off and they get let loose

    Straight after the horses went I had to go and get my bus to take me to the second relay changeover point. The bus dropped us off at the bottom of a steep road, and the driver just said it’s up there. So off we wandered up the hill and through a farmyard. Got to the top of the hill and we all just loitered about for a while wondering where the course was and where the runners would be coming from. A couple of people then started staring off into the distance at the opposite hill and eventually we saw someone appear from the tree line and come running down the hill, a couple of minutes later he appeared over the brow of the hill we were stood near the top of, dropped one of his tags in a bucket and ran on. The full distance runners had to drop tags at various checkpoints to ensure they have all done the full course.

    Was about 4 individual runners came through before the first relay team and before my team appeared there was probably 10 or so individual runners, 6 teams and no horses. Discovered afterwards that our second leg guy had been over taken by a couple of horses, but shortly afterwards the horses took a slightly different route around some hill and they they will have stopped for the vet check that they had to do to make sure the horses are not being over stressed. So with only a couple of seconds warning I take the batton, a sweaty sweat band, off my team mate and go hurtling off down the hill. I over take a couple of people quite quickly on the way down, think one of them was a full distance individual runner as they were looking quite knackered and slowing for the water station, but the other was a relay team guy I had just been chatting to shortly before hand.

    The start of my leg was just on road and rapidly running downhill for a bit, but it soon turned into some nasty uphill running through fields, up forest paths with streams coming down them. Wish I could remember a bit more details to tell you about the beautiful countryside I was running through, but I can’t. I caught another couple of people on the way round, but it was mostly just running on my own with no sight of anyone else either infront or behind me...then going up another trail after a couple of miles there is some loud panting and the sound of heavy foot steps coming at speed behind me. Not quite sure how the etiquette is I just run well off to the side of the path and then the horse comes trotting past and rapidly disappears off up the hill. A few seconds later I hear another one approaching, but this time the rider also shouts to let me know which side they are passing me on. The path then gets bit narrower and just infront I see another runner standing to the side of the path to just keep well out of the way, I then pass that runner a bit further along as well. Down the other side of that hill and the path becomes less than single track wide, low branches, very boggy and a bit steep and uneven to do anything other than very carefully pick your way down. I’m then terrified of meeting another horse along that section as there is nowhere to escape to.

    More of the same for the next few miles, up a hill, down a hill, along a field, through a muddy puddle, run through a stream etc and repeat. Then next thing I know the course does a couple of hairpin turns down a hill, and through a carpark and I running along the road back towards the town where the race starts/ finishes. That doesn’t last for long of course and after a couple of cheers from some clubmates who were just along for the drinking and to support it’s back off the road and up another muddy track up the side of a hill. A little way up I pass a family walking the other way and thankfully they then warn me that there is another horse approaching so I get myself over to the side of the path again. It was four horses in quick succession though, at that point the path was plenty wide enough, but I’m quickly approaching a kink in the path where it turns slightly and through a bit of a fence and I can still hear these horses passing me. the last rider then barks at me “Let me past” as she can see that we might be reaching that point at the same time. Luckily I’m too knackered to run that fast up the hill so they all make it past me just before then.

    Then as the view ahead opens up a bit I get to see where the horses head off to and also see them go charging past another couple of runners ahead. I recognise one of them as another of the relay teams I was chatting to before the handover and the other guys looks knackered enough to be a full distance runner. They are both looking pretty knackered and although I’m doing a bit of walking up the hill at the time I reckon I can catch them, just I don’t know how much further I have to do so. Get to the top of that climb though and I loose sight of them as the course goes round another couple of corners.

    I figure it must all be down hill’ish now, I can sense that the town must be near, can hear the distant sound of the announcer at the finish. So I put my foot down as much as I can on the next bit running along the edge of another field through some long grass. Then I disappear up to the bottom of my shorts in a bog.

    Manage not to loose any shoes and push myself out of that and carry on. Then the marshal at the next gate is in stiches as he’s obviously just been sitting there watching everyone else do the same and fall in the same bog. Carry on a bit further and then it’s back onto tarmac again, can properly hear the tannoy for the finish and the road goes along the side of the river and this would normally be only a couple of hundred meters and the river crossing to go. I’m still not exactly sure how far to go as the rumours had people saying things between “There is no bridge”, “It’s a couple of hundred meters further” or “It’s a mile further”. Anyway, the road goes on and up and down a bit, just over the next rise in the road I spot the first of the guys I saw a bit earlier running together up the previous hill, quick check as I pass him and he wearing a full distance number. Then I see the other guy another couple of hundreds meters further up the road, so I try putting the foot down.

    Over a bridge, round a corner, through another farmyard, and then the finish suddenly appears. If the course was another hundred meters longer I’d have caught the next guy up, but I just ran out of distance. Ended up that we finished in 4th place and that was the 3rd place team just in front of me and 2nd wasn’t much further ahead again.

    Collapse over the line and get a bunch of medals stuck around my neck for the rest of the team. Then off to get a beers and sample some of the daft sandwiches that they have. Think one of them was something like jam, banana and cucumber. :confused:

    There is a few people doing the run dressed up as well. This pair was actually two separate relay teams who didn’t know each other, but one dressed as a horse and one as a jockey they did the last bit into the finish on piggyback. Got some good cheers on crossing the line:

    7173692415_b118903804.jpg

    Slightly scarier finish though can be seen in the pictures 3-7 on this page:

    http://www.equinepix.co.uk/pages/events.php?gall_id=174&page_no=12

    Everyone at the finish could see what was about to happen as the horses came up to the line, but the riders just kept on coming and made no attempt to stop or move. The guy actually flew over the finish line. He seemed uninjured luckily though as he got up and went chasing straight after the rider.

    Was a good event, there was copious amounts of beer drunk before and after, I got a bit sun burnt and covered in lots of mud. Don’t think I’d want to do the full distance though, but that’s because I hate hills and there was more than enough of them on my 8 mile leg so I have no desire to run 22+ miles of them.

    7173704051_ee0773f501.jpg

    Garmin Connect link

    My head hurts today and it feels like I ran a lot more than 8 miles.




  • This is my favorite race of the year so it deserves a race report.......
    Did Bohermeen 5k on 9th June which was a real suprise. First time running this race and I didnt expect much but I was impressed. Good quality field, nice course, great weather, whopper spread after. Perfect.
    I'd been feeling really confident injury wise, as in I hadnt been injured in ages and was now starting to get a little arrogant about how invincible and bullett proof my body was.........Big mistake. Was feeling so confident I decided to give the asics piranhas a bash. While not quite a zero drop heel, they're still flatter than anything I've ever ran in before. Common sense told me to not take such a risk, but like I said, arrogance. Got through the race fine but the next day on a recovery run, right calve tightened up like crazy and that was that. Got it treated and didnt run for a week. Got back into it and right calve felt ok but insanely, the left calve started to give me trouble. Did a session with the lads on tuesday(12 x 400)but after 4 the left calve gave me a big jolt and I had to stop there and then. Rest of the week was spent rehabing like crazy, I knew dunsaughlin was on saturday and really didnt wanna miss that.

    Fast forward to race day and by this stage I hadnt run since the aborted session on tuesday. Headed down with paddy and we were both a bit pissed off at the abscence of the usual dunshaughlin 10k heatwave. But considering how desperate the wind had been during the day it wasnt too bad by the evening. Did a warm up and was a bit concerned at how weak the left calve felt. Sensible thing to do at this stage was to call it off and play it safe. But I just cant do the sensible thing. The crazy runner inside of me always wants to take a risk. To be fair it works out 9/10 so there wasnt any chance of playing it safe.
    Im not into doing strides or anything like that before a race, I know a lot of people swear by an agressive pre race ritual but personally I like to keep it deliberately relaxed, not get wound up. So I strolled up the road towards the start line. Got a tap on the back, it was ultraman saying hello(apologies if I seemed a bit aloof Anto, I was off running the race in my head by that stage). Had a chat with the two Sli cualann boys, Krusty and Abhainn and then it was game on. Made sure to line up right at the front and not have anybody blocking me at all. Race started and I knew I wanted a fast first mile as the second half was slower than the first.
    Found myself in the lead group alongside Gary O hanlon, Mark Hoey and Brian Leahy. Surreal to have the race commentator call out my name several times as we went along. There was a clock at the first mile and we went through in 4:35 which I thought had to be wrong. We were moving alright, but not that fast. Looked at the garmin and it confirmed that we hadnt run a mile yet. Fist mile(by the garmin)was 4:50. Felt grand and knew I was determined to hold onto the lads. But just as we got to the 2k mark my calve gave me a big jolt. I backed off the pace for a bit and that was that, the 3 boys were pulling away from me. I thought I'd have to pull out of the race at any moment, but I decided to keep going until the point came were it was completely fcuked and I just couldnt run on it any longer. Didnt wanna look behind as I knew there was a pack of wolves smelling blood and chasing me down.
    Calve was holding steady though. It was tight and would scream at me anytime there was a change in elevation, but it didnt go on me completely. Brian from raheny dropped off the lads so I concentrated on gettting back up to him, which I did at exactly 5k. I think maybe he deliberatley allowed me to catch him as when I did come alongside him he started to work with me straight away. It was a smart move and something I wouldve done if I was in his position. Nothing worse than getting caught in no mans land.
    Anyway I felt really good, except for the calve which was getting progressively tighter as we went along. I was frantically ticking off the kms wondering if I was gonna make it or if I was gonna have to take the humiliating decision of stepping of the course and be passed by streams of runners as I hobbled my way back to HQ. I really felt like I had lots in the tank but I couldnt open up as it'd be too much for the calve to take.
    Brian had been hanging off my shoulder for a good bit at this stage, letting me do all the pace setting so I knew he was shaping up to out kick me. My plan before the race was to kick at 8k but by this stage the calve was in a jock and I knew if I kicked then I might not make it to the finish. So I held on and decided to make my move at 9k. I was so happy to see the 9k marker as I knew no matter how bad the calve got I'd finish the race. As soon as we passed the 9k sign I kicked it up a gear. Calve screamed in protest but there was no way I was gonna drop it and passively allow myself to be skinned. I'd hoped to shake brian off but he responded to the increase in pace and just hung off my shoulder. Got to 800m to go and the clave started to lock up(as well as screaming at me). I was running ass ways at this stage and brian surged ahead of me. We went by some spectators who applauded as we passed, I was then fairly alarmed to hear them applaud again a few seconds later. I glanced around and nearly jumped out of my skin: The wolves were closing in on us. Fcuk. 400 to go and up ahead Kev English and Anto leggio were shouting at me. I kicked again and passed Brian, the two lads were now screaming like lunatics from the sidelines. Calve was locked up but the thoughts of letting the lads down numbed the pain. 100m to go and I knew it was in the bag, looked over my shoulder way too much(8 times Im told)and crossed the line in 32:35 and in 3rd place.
    Calve felt really bad and I hobbled through the finishing chute. Kids were offering me strawberries and cream but I couldnt stomach even looking at them. Anto came over and rightly gave me a bollickin' for looking around so much(kev gave out to me back in the hall.......and yesterday when I saw him again). Hobbled back to the sports hall where a pretty hot American girl did an amazing job on my calve. Met up with paddy then who had a good one running 35:53. Got stuck into the post race spread, had a laugh at some dude who was obviously out of his box on wild turkey and picked up a prize for 3rd place.
    I know 3rd place sounds good and all but I wasnt happy. I had way more in the tank and I know I couldve stayed with the two lads up the front for a good portion of the race and dipped under 32mins. I dont think 32:35 was reflective of what I can do. I mean it was reflective of what I could do on the night with my calve playing up the way it did, but I just think Im better than that. But this is what happens when you make mistakes and my mistake stretched back to the bohermeen race and the choice of footwear. Calve is doing ok, its a lot better than I though it'd be, I really thought Id fcoked it up big time, but I might even make the 5 miler on saturday. Anyway another great show from dunshaughlin will be back next year and hopefully it'll be business as usual weatherwise.




  • Great run, myself and Brianderunner were with Kevin and the other chap as you came in, you were hiding the pain well.




  • tunguska wrote: »
    This is my favorite race of the year so it deserves a race report.......
    Did Bohermeen 5k on 9th June which was a real suprise. First time running this race and I didnt expect much but I was impressed. Good quality field, nice course, great weather, whopper spread after. Perfect.
    I'd been feeling really confident injury wise, as in I hadnt been injured in ages and was now starting to get a little arrogant about how invincible and bullett proof my body was.........Big mistake. Was feeling so confident I decided to give the asics piranhas a bash. While not quite a zero drop heel, they're still flatter than anything I've ever ran in before. Common sense told me to not take such a risk, but like I said, arrogance. Got through the race fine but the next day on a recovery run, right calve tightened up like crazy and that was that. Got it treated and didnt run for a week. Got back into it and right calve felt ok but insanely, the left calve started to give me trouble. Did a session with the lads on tuesday(12 x 400)but after 4 the left calve gave me a big jolt and I had to stop there and then. Rest of the week was spent rehabing like crazy, I knew dunsaughlin was on saturday and really didnt wanna miss that.

    Fast forward to race day and by this stage I hadnt run since the aborted session on tuesday. Headed down with paddy and we were both a bit pissed off at the abscence of the usual dunshaughlin 10k heatwave. But considering how desperate the wind had been during the day it wasnt too bad by the evening. Did a warm up and was a bit concerned at how weak the left calve felt. Sensible thing to do at this stage was to call it off and play it safe. But I just cant do the sensible thing. The crazy runner inside of me always wants to take a risk. To be fair it works out 9/10 so there wasnt any chance of playing it safe.
    Im not into doing strides or anything like that before a race, I know a lot of people swear by an agressive pre race ritual but personally I like to keep it deliberately relaxed, not get wound up. So I strolled up the road towards the start line. Got a tap on the back, it was ultraman saying hello(apologies if I seemed a bit aloof Anto, I was off running the race in my head by that stage). Had a chat with the two Sli cualann boys, Krusty and Abhainn and then it was game on. Made sure to line up right at the front and not have anybody blocking me at all. Race started and I knew I wanted a fast first mile as the second half was slower than the first.
    Found myself in the lead group alongside Gary O hanlon, Mark Hoey and Brian Leahy. Surreal to have the race commentator call out my name several times as we went along. There was a clock at the first mile and we went through in 4:35 which I thought had to be wrong. We were moving alright, but not that fast. Looked at the garmin and it confirmed that we hadnt run a mile yet. Fist mile(by the garmin)was 4:50. Felt grand and knew I was determined to hold onto the lads. But just as we got to the 2k mark my calve gave me a big jolt. I backed off the pace for a bit and that was that, the 3 boys were pulling away from me. I thought I'd have to pull out of the race at any moment, but I decided to keep going until the point came were it was completely fcuked and I just couldnt run on it any longer. Didnt wanna look behind as I knew there was a pack of wolves smelling blood and chasing me down.
    Calve was holding steady though. It was tight and would scream at me anytime there was a change in elevation, but it didnt go on me completely. Brian from raheny dropped off the lads so I concentrated on gettting back up to him, which I did at exactly 5k. I think maybe he deliberatley allowed me to catch him as when I did come alongside him he started to work with me straight away. It was a smart move and something I wouldve done if I was in his position. Nothing worse than getting caught in no mans land.
    Anyway I felt really good, except for the calve which was getting progressively tighter as we went along. I was frantically ticking off the kms wondering if I was gonna make it or if I was gonna have to take the humiliating decision of stepping of the course and be passed by streams of runners as I hobbled my way back to HQ. I really felt like I had lots in the tank but I couldnt open up as it'd be too much for the calve to take.
    Brian had been hanging off my shoulder for a good bit at this stage, letting me do all the pace setting so I knew he was shaping up to out kick me. My plan before the race was to kick at 8k but by this stage the calve was in a jock and I knew if I kicked then I might not make it to the finish. So I held on and decided to make my move at 9k. I was so happy to see the 9k marker as I knew no matter how bad the calve got I'd finish the race. As soon as we passed the 9k sign I kicked it up a gear. Calve screamed in protest but there was no way I was gonna drop it and passively allow myself to be skinned. I'd hoped to shake brian off but he responded to the increase in pace and just hung off my shoulder. Got to 800m to go and the clave started to lock up(as well as screaming at me). I was running ass ways at this stage and brian surged ahead of me. We went by some spectators who applauded as we passed, I was then fairly alarmed to hear them applaud again a few seconds later. I glanced around and nearly jumped out of my skin: The wolves were closing in on us. Fcuk. 400 to go and up ahead Kev English and Anto leggio were shouting at me. I kicked again and passed Brian, the two lads were now screaming like lunatics from the sidelines. Calve was locked up but the thoughts of letting the lads down numbed the pain. 100m to go and I knew it was in the bag, looked over my shoulder way too much(8 times Im told)and crossed the line in 32:35 and in 3rd place.
    Calve felt really bad and I hobbled through the finishing chute. Kids were offering me strawberries and cream but I couldnt stomach even looking at them. Anto came over and rightly gave me a bollickin' for looking around so much(kev gave out to me back in the hall.......and yesterday when I saw him again). Hobbled back to the sports hall where a pretty hot American girl did an amazing job on my calve. Met up with paddy then who had a good one running 35:53. Got stuck into the post race spread, had a laugh at some dude who was obviously out of his box on wild turkey and picked up a prize for 3rd place.
    I know 3rd place sounds good and all but I wasnt happy. I had way more in the tank and I know I couldve stayed with the two lads up the front for a good portion of the race and dipped under 32mins. I dont think 32:35 was reflective of what I can do. I mean it was reflective of what I could do on the night with my calve playing up the way it did, but I just think Im better than that. But this is what happens when you make mistakes and my mistake stretched back to the bohermeen race and the choice of footwear. Calve is doing ok, its a lot better than I though it'd be, I really thought Id fcoked it up big time, but I might even make the 5 miler on saturday. Anyway another great show from dunshaughlin will be back next year and hopefully it'll be business as usual weatherwise.


    Do you have your eyes on my book deal or something with that report… :rolleyes:;)

    Well done on a tough race and a great placing. I do believe this goes to show that your words of wisdom on my log a while back (http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showpost.php?p=74567981&postcount=1269) were the absolute truth and not an exercise in preaching! Fantastic stuff. :)

    Your report is kind of like the best selling male elite version of mine… Mine (http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showpost.php?p=79394361&postcount=2295) will be hanging around the ‘3 for 2’ section, before relegation to the bargain bucket and ultimately being handed out free with the trashiest Sunday rag as a story about ‘what could have been…’. Sigh.





  • Mr Slow wrote: »
    Great run, myself and Brianderunner were with Kevin and the other chap as you came in, you were hiding the pain well.

    It wasnt so much painful as the feeling that my calve was about to rupture. You're hearing must be severly damaged having stood beside Anto while he was shouting, I could hear him from 600m to go......
    claralara wrote: »
    Do you have your eyes on my book deal or something with that report… :rolleyes:;)

    Well done on a tough race and a great placing. I do believe this goes to show that your words of wisdom on my log a while back (http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showpost.php?p=74567981&postcount=1269) were the absolute truth and not an exercise in preaching! Fantastic stuff. :)

    Your report is kind of like the best selling male elite version of mine… Mine (http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showpost.php?p=79394361&postcount=2295) will be hanging around the ‘3 for 2’ section, before relegation to the bargain bucket and ultimately being handed out free with the trashiest Sunday rag as a story about ‘what could have been…’. Sigh.

    Stephen Kings editor once told him that he had the literary equivalent of diarrhea......I think maybe I have some of that. However my reports pale into insignificance compared to your own, eh, bowl movements. Ok I dont like where this is going......
    Anyway thanks for the nice words. I read your dunshaughlin report and I think mine could actually be a bit longer, so you need to up your game there. I know you weren't happy with your result but I was happy to see you weren't happy, if you know what I mean. It shows you care and when you care that much it'll be like rocket fuel in your next race.


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  • tunguska wrote: »
    It wasnt so much painful as the feeling that my calve was about to rupture. You're hearing must be severly damaged having stood beside Anto while he was shouting, I could hear him from 600m to go.......

    Kevin was worse, he was screaming at the winner like a man possessed.




  • tunguska wrote: »
    It wasnt so much painful as the feeling that my calve was about to rupture. You're hearing must be severly damaged having stood beside Anto while he was shouting, I could hear him from 600m to go......



    Stephen Kings editor once told him that he had the literary equivalent of diarrhea......I think maybe I have some of that. However my reports pale into insignificance compared to your own, eh, bowl movements. Ok I dont like where this is going......
    Anyway thanks for the nice words. I read your dunshaughlin report and I think mine could actually be a bit longer, so you need to up your game there. I know you weren't happy with your result but I was happy to see you weren't happy, if you know what I mean. It shows you care and when you care that much it'll be like rocket fuel in your next race.

    I know what you mean alright… though I think what you really meant was that it’ll be like rocket fuel in the race after my next race! I’m gathering a bank of rocket fuel – going to blow the next one out of the water with my pent up rage and desire to run an awesome race!!




  • claralara wrote: »
    I know what you mean alright… though I think what you really meant was that it’ll be like rocket fuel in the race after my next race! I’m gathering a bank of rocket fuel – going to blow the next one out of the water with my pent up rage and desire to run an awesome race!!

    Amen Sista, Testify!!!:)




  • This deserves a report by virtue of it being the hardest race I've ever run. On paper it looked straight forward, run 25 laps at 76/77 secs per lap. I train on the track all the time so it was cut and dry...........or so I thought.
    Knew the field would be top notch and with only 23 starters the possibility of coming last(and being lapped several times) in front of a crowd, loomed large. Waiting in the call room I was surrounded by dudes who all looked in great nick, not an ounce of excess body fat to be found. I started to feel myself gettinig intimidated but I reigned that in quickly and reminded myself that you're dead before the race even starts if you allow yourself to be overawed. Said hi to Brian maher, whos a top bloke, asked him not to lap me. He laughed and said he'd see what he could do.

    We got the call to head out onto the track, again I felt a little intimidated/nervous, but I was able to knock it on the head and focus on the race and nothing else. It was me, the lads and a track, thats it, nothing else was relevant(well maybe the weather). Lined up and possibly the loudest starting gun ive ever heard got things going. Took off and was on course for a 69 sec first lap so reigned myself in over the last 150m to run a 75. It was baking hot and there was a strong gust of wind that would hammer you in the face for a good 200m of the track. Before the race a couple of the stewarts asked us if we wanted bottles or cups of water. I thought to myself, for a 10k??? Thats a bit over the top. But after 3 laps I was starting to think water was a good idea.
    First mile was 5:02, which should've felt fine but for whatever reasons it took a bite and I knew I wouldnt be able to hold that pace for the entire race. Pauric mckinney went bombing by and I went with him for about a lap but I had to conceed that his pace was too hot, so I let him go. When I did I was a bit alarmed to see two other dudes tear by me. I was a bit unsettled by that and in two minds as to what I should do, try and go with them or stick at my current pace. I decided to stick and got into a rythm alongside Brian murphy from ennis track. But even at that pace(79/80 secs per 400)it felt really uncomfortable. It seemed to be getting hotter and the wind stronger as time went by. I was wondering if I could hold this pace for the full whack. I remember coming up the homestretch at one stage feeling absolutley bolloxed and looking at the lap counter, it said 20 laps remaining...........That was tough. I've never felt like quitting a race so much in my life. It would've been so easy to do, just step off the track and run into the changing rooms to hide away from the shame. Im always giving alaister cragg a hard time over dropping out of races, but in that moment when I saw 20 laps to go I could understand, in some way, why he'd DNF. I suppose its ego really, you dont wanna get lapped by other runners(which just wouldnt happen in a road race)so you quietly give up. But giving up is an easy habit to get into so I resisted the urge to stop and told myself just do one more lap, see what happens.
    Myself and Brian were grinding it out. Im not sure if he was trying to help me with the pace or trying to skin me(I think it was the latter)but every once in a while he'd make a surge to go around me(I had the inside lane)and everytime he did I'd surge aswell so as to not let him by me. This took a bite everytime and I was in a jock trying to hold on. He had lots of support from the sidelines aswell so every 200m there'd be people telling him to skin me. I have to say a few bad words about my club in this respect, I was the only runner from our club in this race, which is bad enough, but the support from the club was zero(it was actually negative, but thats a whole other story). Bad form all around for a race like that.
    But **** it, I had to turn it around some way and make the ennis track support for their athlete work for me. I enjoy being the pantomime villian so there was no way I was gonna miss an opportunity to twirl my mustache and laugh manically(maybe club a few baby seals to death while Im at it).
    I was in a heap though and hanging on for dear life. Lap counter read 6 laps remaining. Not so bad but then I remember something happening in the all too early stages of the race. Brain Maher had come by, I was being lapped. It could've been soul destroying and embarressing but Brian being the top bloke that he is comes alongside me and apologies for lapping me! Thats was a really nice gesture. Anyway to get back to the point, Brian actually lapped me twice so when the lap counter read 6 laps to go it really meant 8 laps to go for me. Which was another kick in the balls and another opportunity for the urge to quit to raise its head. But I had to turn off my thinking and just concentrate on the piece of ground in front of me. Got to 4 laps to go and the lads who had passed me earlier were dying and coming back to me. I re-took the places I lost and started to reel in a few others, which gave me a bit of a lift. By now though I was running out of laps, part of me wanted the race to end(and thats a big part of me)but another part of me wanted more laps so I could gain a few more places and have this run turn out to be halfway respectable.
    2 Laps to go and it was time to concentrate on wininng the inevitable showdown between myself and the dude who'd glued himself to my side for most of the race. He looked like he had a good finish in him, he had the cut of a 1500m man. 1 lap to go and we got the bell, I made a surge that lasted for about 100m before my legs turned to jelly. I had opened a gap but the other guy closed it fairly quickly just like the concertina effect in F1. I thought that was it, I'd blown it and he'd go sailing by me at any second. But he didnt. It must've taken a bite out of him to bridge the gap. Even so he was on my shoulder, but I had the inside lane and he'd have to work hard to get aorund me. I felt him coming around my shoulder as we hit the bend into the final 100m but then I mustered another kick and that was it, I had it. So something of a small victory to salvage from a brutally tough race.
    Sat down with all the lads after the finish were everybody was in a heap, it was carnage everybody was like a zombie, completely fecked. We were only spurred into life though when the girls fresh from their 200m heat came through the vicinity. Wow some seriously hot girls there and all the lads were all of a sudden re-born.

    Upon reflection it was a great race experience. I've had a fair few 2nd and 3rd places over the last few months and when that happens you can start to think you're decent enough. But then you do a race like this and its a reality check. You get to find out where you really stand and its like a blow to your ego. But its a good blow because now I know how much work I need to do to bridge the gap so that this time next year I'll have a crack at top 5 or better in that race. Well done to Brain Maher on winning, great performance but also a really nice touch when he lapped me........twice.

    33:12 13th place




  • I thought that was you out there... if I was sure I'd have given you a shout. A tough race in the heat, and with nowhere to hide. (My brother ran too, but dropped out at halfway)




  • RayCun wrote: »
    I thought that was you out there... if I was sure I'd have given you a shout. A tough race in the heat, and with nowhere to hide. (My brother ran too, but dropped out at halfway)


    Ah cheers Ray. I did get a few shouts from the sportsworld gang which was very classy of them seeing as I was racing a few of their own lads.




  • 13th place is fairly impressive in a good field to be fair.




  • Great report and racing tunguska!




  • 13th place is fairly impressive in a good field to be fair.
    RubyK wrote: »
    Great report and racing tunguska!

    Cheers guys, Im still feeling beat up nearly a week later though. Also found this video of the race:

    http://ireland.flotrack.org/coverage/249544-AAI-Senior-Track-and-Field-Championships-of-Ireland-2012/video/646457-10000m-Team-M-Final


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  • tunguska wrote: »
    Cheers guys, Im still feeling beat up nearly a week later though. Also found this video of the race:

    http://ireland.flotrack.org/coverage/249544-AAI-Senior-Track-and-Field-Championships-of-Ireland-2012/video/646457-10000m-Team-M-Final

    Well done there man, 13th best 10k runner in ireland now.. Top 10 or better next year :).


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