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The Good Kit/Tips Thread

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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 638 ✭✭✭amurph0


    This is my layout. This is personalised for myself so it might not be preferable for some :D

    In Pockets:

    Top Left Smock Pocket:
    • TacAide Pouch. With waterproof notepad, battlebook, needed TAMs pages, black/red permanent markers/chinagraph pencils, alchowipes (wipes permanent marker off anything)
    • Whistle with small compass built into it (tied to pocket)

    Top Right Smock Pocket:
    • Very small A5 mapcase with green/blue/red/black markers as well as alchowipes.
    • Map is mainly OSI Map 56 for the Glen of Imaal, the west side of the glen is on map 55 i believe. I've only ever needed 56 anyway. I think it's 82 or something for Kilworth?
    • Silva Compass

    Bottom Left Smock Pocket:
    • Titanium Folding Spork (very light and very compact)
    • Red Head-torch
    • Nutri-grain Bars and a packet of Haribo

    Bottom Right Smock Pocket:
    • 5-colour camo cream with built in mirror. Lasts way longer then the stick type even when your covered in sweat. Easier to apply, especially for ears and back of the neck. When finished, rub your hands together so the remainder camouflages your hands.
    • Lighter (in ziplock bag).
    • Paracord
    • Black Tape
    • Survival Kit

    Left Arm:
    • Pocket Tissues wrapped in small ziplock
    • Black/Red Permanent Markers

    Right Arm:
    • First Field Dressing with surgical gloves in ziplock.

    Left Leg
    • Bush Hat

    Left Leg
    • Fingerless gloves (i'd usually be wearing these all the time anyway)

    I also took the string out from the legs of the pants and instead replaced them with trouser twists. I then closed the hook on them so they couldn't come undone. Hey presto! built in trouser blousers! :D

    =========================================================================================================

    CEFO:

    I usually use a vest, but this is my layout for PLCE:

    Pouches:
    • 2x Double Ammo Pouches (either side)
    • 1x Waterbottle Pouch (on right side behind ammo pouches)
    • 3x Utility Pouch

    Left Ammo Pouches
    • Magazines obviously :D

    Right Ammo pouches
    • Grenades (provided you cut out the dividers)

    Waterbottle
    • American style 1qt Canteen. (Not all american style waterbottles in camping shops are reliable, some are imitation and leak. The imitation ones have a flat bottom with angles corners. The real ones have rounded corners at the bottom and the end curves inwards slightly. And are also a darker, duller shade of OD green I found that out the hard way!)

    Back Left Utility Pouch:
    • Metal Cup with noodles, hexi cooker and lighter inside it. This stops your noodles getting crushed or bursting. With elastic band to stop the handles making noise, all inside a ziplock bag
    • Rifle Cleaning kit
    • Glowsticks/Cyalumes
    • First-Aid Kit with blister pads added in (on top of everything so it can be reached fast)

      Rest of utility pouches are for spare ammo/ordnance

      I also have a small pouch attached to the left shoulder that holds my multi-tool.

      Attach a carabiner to the top right shoulder for river-crossings and to attach the rifle to it if need be. Another carabiner in between the right ammo pouches for clipping your peltors onto. And another on the back right side of your CEFO to fix your helmet onto.

      Get cats eyes for your helmet. They help your buddies spot you when operating at night, they can only be seen from about 10m away, you would not notice them unless you were specifically looking for them. It's so your section doesn't move off without someone at the back not noticing and getting left behind.

    Colour Coding:

    Use coloured insulation tape on the closures to identify pouches for other people in the section who may need to get things from your CEFO while you do other tasks.
    • Blue = Water
    • Red = Medical
    • WHITE = Ammo

    Use black tape to narrow it down so it's just a small marking about half a centimetre thick.

    Use a RED permanent marker to draw a medical cross on the pouch with the first aid kit. It is very dull and dark so it's not going to give you away.
    =========================================================================================================

    Daysack:

    I use the 45ltr Protac daysack, which kinda has the same layout as the issue one only with side pouches.

    24ltr drybag to line main compartment.

    Main Compartment:
    • Misc Items: NVG, Radio, etc
    • Wet Gear Jacket
    • American Style 1qt Canteen
    • Snugpak Sleeka Elite (i dont use the norwegian fleece at all)
    • 3ltr SOURCE water bladder
    • Warm Hat
    • Fleece Neck Gaiter
    • Spare Socks (Bridgedale Trekker socks)

    Lid Pocket:
    • Spare Ammo and Ordnance

    Side Pouch:
    • Red Torch
    • Mini-Binoculars (not always packed)
    • Pruning Shears/Garden Secateurs (can really come in handy, a good pair could cut barbed wire)
    • Spare AAA batteries in ziplock bag.

    Other Side Pouch:
    • Spare Rations

    I have a bundle of cable ties kept in place tightly by ~6 other cableties on the outside of the pack, this allows you to just pull one out when you need one instead of searching through the pack.

    =========================================================================================================

    Main Pack

    80ltr Drybag to line main compartment
    10ltr Drybag for each side pouch


    Main Compartment Bottom
    • Sleeping Bag inside Goretex bivvi bag with 2 bungee's keeping it all together

    Main Compartment Top
    • Mess tins, with spare spork. Put the small mess tin into a wool hat and it will keep them quiet. Also put the mess tin into a ziplock bag when eating so you don't have to clean it, just throw away the bag. (you only need the mess tins when you know your gonna get hot locks on the ground)
    • 2x American 1qt canteens. (the reason i have canteens instead of a 2ltr bottle of water is because you can just take out the canteen and throw it straight into your CEFO without any fiddling around filling it up.) Put the canteens into the SINCGARS pouch inside the main compartment for easy reach. Always keep water in the main compartment. Putting it in the side pouches unbalances the load.
    • 1x metal cup on one of your canteens, this cup is used specifically for washing/shaving and should be marked accordingly. (elastic band around it to keep the handles quiet)
    • Spare bag for dirty clothes
    • Warm gloves
    • Babywipes (in ziplock)
    • Small 330ml thermo-flask. (Can fit into ammo pouch if need be.)

    Left Side Pouch (Clothes - everything in ziplocks)
    • 1x Spare Pants.
    • 1x Spare Shirt.
    • 1x Spare Under-armour t-shirt.
    • 1x Spare Under-armour boxer.
    • 4x Spare Socks (Bridgedale Trekker).
    • 1x Goretex Socks.
    • 1x Medium Sized Green Towel

      This should just about barely fit into one rocket pouch.

    Right Side Pouch
    • Wetgear pants
    • Gaiters
    • Poncho

    Interior Lid Pouch
    • Main Rations
    • Hygiene Kit with Shaver, very small travel sized can of shaving gel, foot powder, vaseline (to prevent hands and lips drying out and cracking), folding toothbrush, small travel sized tooth paste, facecloth and a small bar of soap. (The soap can be used instead of shaving gel, but i prefer the gel)

    Exterior Lid Pouch (Utility Items)
    • 4x Bungees in ziplock to keep them together
    • A bundle of elastic bands inside a ziplock bag
    • 8x tent pegs in ziplock bag (with red and yellow tape around the top so they can be spotted easily when packing up)
    • Spare Paracord
    • Spare Glowsticks/Cyalumes
    • Sandbags
    • Small tin of oil to refill one in rifle cleaning kit when need be. And for other uses.
    • 2x Spare rolls of Black Tape

    Exterior:
    • Roll mat mounted horizontally near the bottom of the pack using a helmet clamp (allows you to clip it on and off with out bothering with bungees. Can also be used to mount a helmet or a SRAAW or anything of that sort). I also use straps with rucksack buckles to tighten the roll mat instead of bungees. Bungee's will break if kept under tension for extended periods of time.
    • Basha stuffed into the hole in the middle of the roll mat.
    • Entrenching tool in E-Tool pouch.
    • Cableties tied with ~6 other cable ties to the outside of the pack, just as with daysack.

    =========================================================================================================

    That's it i think! That's what i would pack for upto a 72hr exercise. Hope i didn't miss anything :D

    [EDITED: To incorporate advice from Poccington]


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,533 ✭✭✭iceage


    NBC? Noddy suit?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 638 ✭✭✭amurph0


    iceage wrote: »
    NBC? Noddy suit?

    That would go into the CBRN pouch when issued. The PLCE CBRN pouch can be rigged to be mounted onto your thigh apparently. Never tried that though.

    Also, a PLCE utility pouch can also be rigged up to hold the belt for a GPMG. Use cable ties to mount it onto the feet tray. You need to put the belt in a certain way so it'll feed out properly.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,497 ✭✭✭Poccington


    amurph0 wrote: »
    That would go into the CBRN pouch when issued. The PLCE CBRN pouch can be rigged to be mounted onto your thigh apparently. Never tried that though.

    Also, a PLCE utility pouch can also be rigged up to hold the belt for a GPMG. Use cable ties to mount it onto the feet tray. You need to put the belt in a certain way so it'll feed out properly.

    The CBRN Suit comes with it's own pack, you put it in either your daysack if the CBRN threat is there, in your Pack if it's not. The CBRN Pouch you refer to is used only for your respirator, your whole CBRN suit wouldn't fit into it.

    Why do you have a metal mug in your CEFO, then mess tins in your pack? Also, what's in your emergency rations?

    Why have spare t shirts as well as under armour type shirts? Same goes for boxers along with under armour type shorts. If the t shirts you're using are the issued cotton ones, ditch them. Although I'd imagine you're referring to the either Helly Hansen's or Dri Flo's. As for boxers, I've yet to meet a single person that wears them on the ground. It's either cycling shorts or else commando.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 638 ✭✭✭amurph0


    Poccington wrote: »
    The CBRN Suit comes with it's own pack, you put it in either your daysack if the CBRN threat is there, in your Pack if it's not. The CBRN Pouch you refer to is used only for your respirator, your whole CBRN suit wouldn't fit into it.

    I'm RDF so i didn't know that because i've never been issued any CBRN gear, thanks for the info :)
    Poccington wrote: »
    Why do you have a metal mug in your CEFO, then mess tins in your pack? Also, what's in your emergency rations?

    I said the mess tins are only for when your getting hot locks on the ground. Like during that annual assessment. If not then i wouldn't bring them.

    For rations i have just a pack of noodles inside the mug in the CEFO and some nutri-grain bars or power bars or whatever in the smock, and some small things like jellies.

    And just like a pack of noodles and some extra bars in the side of the daysack.
    Poccington wrote: »
    Why have spare t shirts as well as under armour type shirts? Same goes for boxers along with under armour type shorts. If the t shirts you're using are the issued cotton ones, ditch them. Although I'd imagine you're referring to the either Helly Hansen's or Dri Flo's. As for boxers, I've yet to meet a single person that wears them on the ground. It's either cycling shorts or else commando.

    It depends on whether its a 24hr or a 72hr. I'd ditch the regular t-shirts and jocks for a 24hr. But bring them for a 72hr or longer.


    This is just a packing list i made for myself. I'm looking for advice on it like, so any constructive criticism is appreciated :)

    Looking back over (having never been on a 72hr yet) i'd probably ditch the regular shirts and boxers alright, the 2 sets of under armour should do me fine. thanks! :D


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,533 ✭✭✭iceage


    Just a suggestion, I'd always carry a couple more lighters or things that go spark spread around my kit. Cheap as chips (Bic) but priceless when you need them to get a brew on.

    I am partial to glucose sucky sweets, for a bit of a lift but not the glassy ones that shred your mouth and I know they are salty but I'd also carry an oxo cube or two, for a hot drink. Was there any torch(s) in that list? can't remember, Red filters for the NV.. All these weigh ounces and take up little or no room but can make you a wee bit more comfortable.

    Funny I'm just texting my eldest who's out with mates tonight in a tent had he remembered his head torch! considering I just found it on his desk I reckon hes fogotten it.:rolleyes:

    Just spotted the red head torch Amurph0 :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 638 ✭✭✭amurph0


    iceage wrote: »
    Just a suggestion, I'd always carry a couple more lighters or things that go spark spread around my kit. Cheap as chips (Bic) but priceless when you need them to get a brew on.

    I am partial to glucose sucky sweets, for a bit of a lift but not the glassy ones that shred your mouth and I know they are salty but I'd also carry an oxo cube or two, for a hot drink. Was there any torch(s) in that list? can't remember, Red filters for the NV.. All these weigh ounces and take up little or no room but can make you a wee bit more comfortable.

    Funny I'm just texting my eldest who's out with mates tonight in a tent had he remembered his head torch! considering I just found it on his desk I reckon hes fogotten it.:rolleyes:

    Yeah i have 2 lighters. One inside the metal cup. And another in my smock pocket in a ziplock bag. Also the survival kit has firesteel in it.

    I've also just bought one of these from RvOps:
    http://www.rvops.co.uk/turbo-flame-lighter-1764:d9fe2c4a6bb632fda66e9aafcfb9fd23.html

    I haven't got it yet tho.

    And yeah, i had 2 torches in the list. One in the daysack, and a head torch in the smock. Both with red filters. :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,497 ✭✭✭Poccington


    amurph0 wrote: »
    I'm RDF so i didn't know that because i've never been issued any CBRN gear, thanks for the info :)

    Consider yourself lucky that you've neevr experienced the joy of CBRN training :p


    amurph0 wrote: »
    I said the mess tins are only for when your getting hot locks on the ground. Like during that annual assessment. If not then i wouldn't bring them.

    For rations i have just a pack of noodles inside the mug in the CEFO and some nutri-grain bars or power bars or whatever in the smock, and some small things like jellies.

    And just like a pack of noodles and some extra bars in the side of the daysack.

    On the mess tins/hot locks side of things, you still don't need to bring them. Just bring an extra few zip lock bags and when you're getting your bit of grub, place the zip lock bag inside the metal mug and the food will go there. Saves you having to carry and clean mess tins, plus you can just **** the bag in the bin or whatever when you're finished.

    For your emergency rations, noodles won't do it. Get into Great Outdoors or whatever, pick yourself up 2 boil in the bag meals, get some high carb bars or energy gels, then the likes of sachets of soup, hot chocolate, coffee etc. and one or two mini bars of chocolate for morale purposes. Oh, and puri-tabs in case you have to use a natural water source.

    You'll be able to work out the kinks in your rations yourself but your emergency rations are supposed to be able to sustain you in the case of being in a situation where you either ditch your pack or somehow get seperated from it. Noodles won't do that.
    amurph0 wrote: »
    It depends on whether its a 24hr or a 72hr. I'd ditch the regular t-shirts and jocks for a 24hr. But bring them for a 72hr or longer.


    This is just a packing list i made for myself. I'm looking for advice on it like, so any constructive criticism is appreciated :)

    Looking back over (having never been on a 72hr yet) i'd probably ditch the regular shirts and boxers alright, the 2 sets of under armour should do me fine. thanks! :D

    The cotton t-shirts are a no go for any kind of activity where you'll be sweating. Don't ever use them on any kind of exercise. Get yourself Dri-Flo's or else a few Helly Hansen tops for using on tactics. They'll wick the sweat away from your body, while cotton t shirts won't.

    Also ditch the green towel, pick up a compact towel instead. Ditch the shirt from your pack too, you don't need it. Ditch the poncho too, you have wet gear as it is, there's no need for a poncho.

    You have way too many markers as well. You have markers in your tac aide pouch, map case and in your shirt pocket. Keep them in your tac aide pouch, there's no need for them in your sleeve pocket and maybe 2 in the map case.

    Get rid of the survival kit too, you'll have no need for it at all. Replace it with a space blanket instead.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 638 ✭✭✭amurph0


    Poccington wrote: »
    On the mess tins/hot locks side of things, you still don't need to bring them.

    Tell that to the NCO's who roar at you for having a metal cup instead of mess tins! :D
    Poccington wrote: »
    Just bring an extra few zip lock bags and when you're getting your bit of grub, place the zip lock bag inside the metal mug and the food will go there. Saves you having to carry and clean mess tins, plus you can just **** the bag in the bin or whatever when you're finished.

    Yeah i had that tip up in the list already. I learned that in 3star camp off one of our NCO's. :)
    Poccington wrote: »
    For your emergency rations, noodles won't do it. Get into Great Outdoors or whatever, pick yourself up 2 boil in the bag meals, get some high carb bars or energy gels, then the likes of sachets of soup, hot chocolate, coffee etc. and one or two mini bars of chocolate for morale purposes. Oh, and puri-tabs in case you have to use a natural water source.

    You'll be able to work out the kinks in your rations yourself but your emergency rations are supposed to be able to sustain you in the case of being in a situation where you either ditch your pack or somehow get seperated from it. Noodles won't do that.

    Yeah i was meaning to do that alright and make up my own 24hr rations instead of playing the luck of the draw and getting issued rations i don't like! Or worse........a vegetarian pack! :eek: :D
    Poccington wrote: »
    The cotton t-shirts are a no go for any kind of activity where you'll be sweating. Don't ever use them on any kind of exercise. Get yourself Dri-Flo's or else a few Helly Hansen tops for using on tactics. They'll wick the sweat away from your body, while cotton t shirts won't.

    Yeah thats why i got the underarmour stuff. I picked the underarmour over the Dri-Flo or Helly Hanson because it seems to be a lot thinner and lighter. Thats why i had the cotton tshirts initially because i thought that the underarmour wouldn't provide enough heat during the night. During the summer it's grand at night with the underarmour, but i dont know how it would compare in the winter.
    Poccington wrote: »
    Also ditch the green towel, pick up a compact towel instead. Ditch the shirt from your pack too, you don't need it. Ditch the poncho too, you have wet gear as it is, there's no need for a poncho.

    It's not the issue green towel, it just happens to be green. And it's already fairly small, it's barely bigger then tea towel :D

    We usually don't get issued both the basha and poncho, it's either one or the other, so we use the poncho as a basha.

    Usually i wouldn't bring it if i had the basha, but the course i'm on requires it.

    We're required to have a shirt on the ground as well. :rolleyes:
    Poccington wrote: »
    You have way too many markers as well. You have markers in your tac aide pouch, map case and in your shirt pocket. Keep them in your tac aide pouch, there's no need for them in your sleeve pocket and maybe 2 in the map case.

    Get rid of the survival kit too, you'll have no need for it at all. Replace it with a space blanket instead.

    Noted. :D

    I'd keep the different colored markers in the map case though, their useful for highlighting things so you can identify them easier. Red for enemy, blue for friendly and so on. It would probably make sense to have green/blue in the map case, and black/red in the tac-aide pouch. Meaning i'd have all the colors i'd need. :)

    I'd hold onto to the survival kit, not because of an actual survival situation but because it's fairly small and light, and contains handy things like a wire saw, firesteel and so on, as well as a built in mirror, which i usually use anyways.


    Also i've changed the binoculars to a monocular, picked one up in a shop and it's 10x magnification and is barely bigger then a small torch, and only cost a fiver! Does the job! :D

    EDIT: I can't seem to edit the list for some reason so i can add in the monocular. :S


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,267 ✭✭✭concussion


    Pretty comprehensive list, very similar to my layout. Good tips there from Poccington,esp the emergency food/brew kit. There are some minor things I would alter though. Consolidate your spare clothes with your sleeping bag and ditch the two 10 l drybags. Drop the map case (may be mandatory for courses), half the tent pegs, the four bungees and the two spare rolls of black tape - these, along with the mess tins and poncho you've already lost will save you nearly a kilo I reckon.

    On the camouflage front, I found the 5 colour palette to be crap - strange shades,too greasy and shiny, comes off too easily and runs out quickly. This may have been the particular brand so crack on if it suits. I prefer the split green/brown stick - you can build up a solid green base to put the brown over, it stays for hours, is IRR and has sunscreen and mosquito repellant.

    I reckon my last point won't apply to you as you seem well prepared, but I find it better to refer to my uniforms as 'wet' and 'dry' as opposed to spare. It's a psychological thing really, but so many people go out, get wet and throw on their dry kit when they harbour up. They then go out on a patrol without changing back and are then left without any dry clothes - stuff like that can put you at a severe disadvantage when the weather is cold.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 638 ✭✭✭amurph0


    concussion wrote: »
    Consolidate your spare clothes with your sleeping bag and ditch the two 10 l drybags. Drop the map case (may be mandatory for courses), half the tent pegs, the four bungees and the two spare rolls of black tape - these, along with the mess tins and poncho you've already lost will save you nearly a kilo I reckon.

    I like to keep the clothes in the side pouches to keep as low of a profile i can with the pack. If i put it in the main compartment then along with the dayack under the lid it becomes too high, making it harder to look up or aim the rifle when looking down.

    The map case is very very small, it's only big enough for an A5 sized map of the training area, i barely notice when i'm carrying it and find it very handy. :)

    I'd keep the bungee's and black tape. Spare bungee's are handy if you have to make an odd shaped bivouac, like the one i had to make last time i was on the assessment in the glen. We were at the edge of the woods and i had to set up a bivvy for the FSG. It was in an odd position because there was only one tree and a stump further away. I managed to use my spare bungee's to build a bivouac by clipping the 3 poncho's the FSG had. With the point for the GPMG in between the tree and the stump facing out, and the bivvy extending just over the stump to accommodate space for 2 people. Without the bungee's i wouldn't have been able to do it. :D

    The extra pegs also helped with what i said above, but their also for mine detection. You place the peg to mark the position of a suspected mine.
    concussion wrote: »
    On the camouflage front, I found the 5 colour palette to be crap - strange shades,too greasy and shiny, comes off too easily and runs out quickly. This may have been the particular brand so crack on if it suits. I prefer the split green/brown stick - you can build up a solid green base to put the brown over, it stays for hours, is IRR and has sunscreen and mosquito repellant.

    I may be the particular brand maybe i dunno? But as for colors i find that the green in the pallete when rubbed onto the skin becomes very yellowy, almost not green at all. But if you look at the pallet there is a bluey green color, almost like teal or something. When you rub it in it becomes a proper dark green.

    I didn't find it too be shiny at all, although i usually put on a good bit of it.

    I wore it for a 24hr exercise and it lasted almost to the very end! The next day most of my face was still covered. One of our NCO's who used the same type also had the stuff still on him. He had it done up in some mad intricate design and everything. :D
    concussion wrote: »
    I reckon my last point won't apply to you as you seem well prepared, but I find it better to refer to my uniforms as 'wet' and 'dry' as opposed to spare. It's a psychological thing really, but so many people go out, get wet and throw on their dry kit when they harbour up. They then go out on a patrol without changing back and are then left without any dry clothes - stuff like that can put you at a severe disadvantage when the weather is cold.

    Yeah thats usually what i do anyways. :D

    Me and a few other fella's recently started training with this weight and i find it to be ok. The place where we are training is a wooded area which at one part has very steep incline (almost 60 degree's i think) about 50m high with a rope to pull yourself up. We're able to scale that part well enough with the packs while taking a few minutes breather at the top before continuing down a slight slope and back around to climb back up the hill again. We're doing this for about 3 hours about 3 times a week.

    I'm also doing the training with this weight because i want to hopefully get into the PDF when they start recruiting. :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,497 ✭✭✭Poccington


    amurph0 wrote: »
    Tell that to the NCO's who roar at you for having a metal cup instead of mess tins! :D

    If an NCO bottles someone for having a metal mug instead of a mess tin, they're a numpty. If same NCO actually uses mess tins, he's an even bigger numpty.

    amurph0 wrote: »
    Yeah i was meaning to do that alright and make up my own 24hr rations instead of playing the luck of the draw and getting issued rations i don't like! Or worse........a vegetarian pack! :eek: :D

    Oh I don't mean turn up with your own rations rather than an issued one. :pac:

    I meant you're supposed to carry emergency rations on your CEFO, which are seperate to your issued ration packs. As it is, your emergency rations are a packet of noodles. That's not going to keep you going for 24 hours and it's certainly not going to provide a sufficient amount of calories or carbs to keep you ticking over.

    I've seen too many people that think having a packet of noodles and a couple of mini mars bars qualifies as emergency rations.

    amurph0 wrote: »
    Yeah thats why i got the underarmour stuff. I picked the underarmour over the Dri-Flo or Helly Hanson because it seems to be a lot thinner and lighter. Thats why i had the cotton tshirts initially because i thought that the underarmour wouldn't provide enough heat during the night. During the summer it's grand at night with the underarmour, but i dont know how it would compare in the winter.

    Personally I'm not too keen on UnderArmour gear, I tend to stick to the Helly Hansen stuff personally. Hasn't let me down yet but in this case, it's users preference really.

    amurph0 wrote: »
    I'd keep the different colored markers in the map case though, their useful for highlighting things so you can identify them easier. Red for enemy, blue for friendly and so on. It would probably make sense to have green/blue in the map case, and black/red in the tac-aide pouch. Meaning i'd have all the colors i'd need. :)

    Just put all your coloured markers into the tac-aide pouch.

    Seriously, assuming you're a Private you're not going to be marking down enemy positions etc. on your map. Plus, marking your map and getting grid references will always be done in a static position or at least it will never be done on the move. So you've no particular need to have different colours in different cases. When you're making up a route card and marking RV's etc. it will all be done in a static location.

    Enemy positions etc. would all require 10 figure grid references and basic Infantry Privates will never be asked for a 10 figure grid. Nor will you have a need as a Rifleman to start marking your map with enemy positions, friendly lines etc. The last time I used a 10 figure grid reference, I was marking mortar lines, OP's, targets and was calling in mortar fire. In an Infantry Bn, outside of Recce and Mortars, Privates aren't going to be asked for 10 figure grids.

    Having different markers in different cases is overkill.
    amurph0 wrote: »
    I'd hold onto to the survival kit, not because of an actual survival situation but because it's fairly small and light, and contains handy things like a wire saw, firesteel and so on, as well as a built in mirror, which i usually use anyways.

    You have a multi-tool already, no need for a wire saw especially considering how easily they snap.

    Put the mirror into your housewife kit.

    You have 2 lighters with you, if you really want you can put your firesteel in with your emergency rations along with 2-3 tampons for helping to start a fire.

    Seriously, survival kits are ****e. I've carried them and used them in a survival Ex. and they're not worth a ****. The only useful thing in it is the firesteel. You're better off ditching it and carrying a space blanket instead, it's definitely more useful.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 638 ✭✭✭amurph0


    Poccington wrote: »
    Oh I don't mean turn up with your own rations rather than an issued one. :pac:

    No i mean i was just gonna buy the main meals, not the whole thing pack! :D

    Poccington wrote: »
    You have 2 lighters with you, if you really want you can put your firesteel in with your emergency rations along with 2-3 tampons for helping to start a fire.

    Thats a good idea, i was wondering what to use for tinder! :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,267 ✭✭✭concussion


    Coat the cotton liberally in vaseline first - it keeps the flame going for ~60 seconds. For very wet weather, use some bicycle inner tube cut into strips. It needs a flame to start but if you have a lighter or burning tampon/vaseline combo you can use it to start a fire if your fuel is wet. Always raise the fuel a few cm's above the ground to keep it in the driest air possible.


  • Registered Users Posts: 834 ✭✭✭The Agogo


    Reading this list with much intrigue!

    So the essentials appear to be:

    -Paracord (can't get enough)
    -Knife
    -Fire
    -Black Tape
    -Ziplocks
    -Cable Ties
    -Babywipes/Alcowipes
    -Elastic Bands

    Can someone provide a list of small items that are necessities? Such as knives, compasses, torches etc for the the beginning soldier please?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 901 ✭✭✭ChunkyLover_53


    The Agogo wrote: »
    Reading this list with much intrigue!

    So the essentials appear to be:

    -Paracord (can't get enough)
    -Knife
    -Fire
    -Black Tape
    -Ziplocks
    -Cable Ties
    -Babywipes/Alcowipes
    -Elastic Bands

    Can someone provide a list of small items that are necessities? Such as knives, compasses, torches etc for the the beginning soldier please?

    All of the above plus some stuff I've done without in the past but once I used them I can't see how I managed without them-

    Headtorch with Red Filter covered with a piece of black tape if light discipline is a problem. Attach it with a Karabiner to your Combat Jacket, do the same with a spoon/spork.

    Silva Compass in Mils, NOT DEGREES. Tie it to your Combat Jacket keep it in a Cloth Sunglasses Bag in case it falls out at night.
    Gortex/Waterproof Socks - only use them if you're getting the head down & your boots are soaked, pop these on after you dry/powder your feet & they'll stay dry & warm in the wet boots. TAKE THEM OFF BEFORE YOU MOVE OUT ANYWHERE. Sleep with your feet in the boots inside half a black bin liner so you don't wreck your sleeping bag (if your lucky enough to have the time to use it :) )

    Cheap Eye liner Pencil instead of a Chinagraph pencil. Saved a few quid. Keep a few in your jacket so you'll never be stuck for a pencil in the rain.

    Karabiners - multiple use's in all walks of life.

    Gardeners Gloves from B&Q or Woodies - Got sick off ruining expensive gloves from all over the world, found multi purpose gardening gloves from DIY stores are perfect for all things tactical. Tough as old boots and cheap to replace if you leave them in Stranahealy car Park for the 100th time this year...please try to get black or green ones, the pink ones clash with the CS's face while hes screaming at you.

    Dry bags of all shapes & sizes.

    Foot Powder by the kilo for your feet & nether regions and 20 John Player Blue to keep the Mozzies/Midges at bay.

    Don't make or buy fancy Model Kits just get different coloured paper (red, green & yellow especially), laminate it, cut it up in small manageable sizes and when you need to use it draw your Mil Symbols directly onto the pieces instead of fumbling through a model kit looking for specific cards.

    Those small foldable cups, think they are Swedish, Keep it in your Combat Jacket & never miss a brew.

    Speaking of brews! Those Liveventure cup/flask things. They hold 0.8l and keep a brew warm for a couple of hours & never leak cost anything from 10 -15 euro


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,512 ✭✭✭BigDuffman


    On the home made model kits, when you laminate the important symbols (like chunky mentioned no need to have one done out for everything) stick a 1c (if your affluent why not use a Euro!!) coin into the laminate pouch before you put it through. The weight keeps the markers from blowing away.


  • Registered Users Posts: 114 ✭✭dodgydes


    +1 on the goretex socks and the small flask. nothing better than a hot chocolate when you return to your bivvy/trench from a patrol in the wee hours ( for you and your buddy)

    The best tip I can give is to keep the weight to an absolute minimum. Remember you may be issued ammo, kite sights, CBRN gear, radios/batteries and other equip before going on the ground. The extra weight builds up pretty quickly


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,445 ✭✭✭✭kowloon


    To avoid starting a new thread, can anyone tell me what the old OG jacket was called? The one that looked a bit like a US M65 jacket.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,827 ✭✭✭Donny5


    kowloon wrote: »
    To avoid starting a new thread, can anyone tell me what the old OG jacket was called? The one that looked a bit like a US M65 jacket.

    I'm pretty sure it was just the OG jacket. It's not an M65. I have one at home I look at for you if you want.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,195 ✭✭✭goldie fish


    kowloon wrote: »
    To avoid starting a new thread, can anyone tell me what the old OG jacket was called? The one that looked a bit like a US M65 jacket.

    Its successor was known as the "slashpocket" but I believe the OG was a copy of the dennison smock.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,445 ✭✭✭✭kowloon


    It just looks a bit like a US M65 but it's FF stamped.
    The tag was cut out, presumably so the original owner couldn't be identified.

    Olive Green, plastic buttons, metal zip with a heavy pull ring on it. Pretty sure I remember them wearing them in Gormanstown. Left chest pocket has small sectioned off part for pens. There's a fastening tab to turn the collar into a high neck like an M65. Just want to get the correct name and details so I can tag it.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,195 ✭✭✭goldie fish


    kowloon wrote: »
    It just looks a bit like a US M65 but it's FF stamped.
    The tag was cut out, presumably so the original owner couldn't be identified.

    Olive Green, plastic buttons, metal zip with a heavy pull ring on it. Pretty sure I remember them wearing them in Gormanstown. Left chest pocket has small sectioned off part for pens. There's a fastening tab to turn the collar into a high neck like an M65. Just want to get the correct name and details so I can tag it.

    It looks like an M65 in that it is green and has 4 square pockets, thats where the similarity ends.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,445 ✭✭✭✭kowloon


    It looks like an M65 in that it is green and has 4 square pockets, thats where the similarity ends.

    True, I have an older M65 and excepting the cold weather liner I reckon I'd prefer the Irish jacket if I had to wear one of them. It's made of tougher material and the elbows have reinforcement.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,827 ✭✭✭Donny5


    kowloon wrote: »
    It just looks a bit like a US M65 but it's FF stamped.
    The tag was cut out, presumably so the original owner couldn't be identified.

    Olive Green, plastic buttons, metal zip with a heavy pull ring on it. Pretty sure I remember them wearing them in Gormanstown. Left chest pocket has small sectioned off part for pens. There's a fastening tab to turn the collar into a high neck like an M65. Just want to get the correct name and details so I can tag it.

    Sorry, I looked all over for mine, but it's gone walkies.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14 2selfconscious


    would it be a good idea to keep elastic bands with your camo cream ? ... so when your told to cam up you could use the elastic bands with grass , branches , leaves etc to break up the outline of the weapon or would you look stupid doing this ??? ... like would the heat off the weapon after firing cause you problems if you did this ?

    any tips on packing the CEMO well ?


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 2,688 Mod ✭✭✭✭Morpheus


    Elastics are a good idea..

    you need a LOT for a career course as you will tear through them by repeated camo up day in and day out.

    gun wont effect them unless you camo up the barrels using elastic!!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 114 ✭✭dodgydes


    Whats the best place to get a Snugpak jacket, not online?

    Anyone recommend a better alternative to the Snugpak


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 2,688 Mod ✭✭✭✭Morpheus


    buffalo and look at www.rvops.co.uk most of my rdf mates use it.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,512 ✭✭✭BigDuffman


    I've had all three and Montanes over the buffalo / snugpak any day.

    Montane can be worn as an outer layer. Buffalos are designed to be worn next to the skin.


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