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WHV Work thread - What Industries Are Still Booming Down Here?

  • 23-02-2009 9:01pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 10,658 ✭✭✭✭ The Sweeper


    Right, folks, I've seen a few threads from people lamenting the difficulty of getting work in Australia, so I figured I'd start this thread in the hope that people who are established in industries, and in the know about those industries, can share their experiences.

    First up, I think it's fair to say that entering a recession, the casual work dries up. People coming on a WHV, this means YOU. You are going to find it hard to get jobs as casual labourers, restaurant staff, and possibly also call centre staff and contract IT staff. Additionally, with the lack of casual jobs, there is more competition for the jobs that are available. Australia has a large low-skilled workforce made up of its own young people and migrant workers - and they have something you don't: residency. That means they can keep their mundane job for a year instead of three months before moving on. It makes them a more attractive hire prospect than you.

    Furthermore, and I've said this on other threads, the WHV is a working HOLIDAY visa. It isn't designed for you to escape the recession and build a new life. It's provided by Australia because they want you to bum around their foreign country having beery adventures and spending tourist dollars in remote areas. It's designed to allow you to work just enough to fund your next beery adventure. That's what it has ALWAYS been for. In the past, people have been able to use it as a back door into residency and citizenship, but that door has closed. These days, the WHV does exactly what it says on the tin.

    Last thing - rural areas. Rural Australia is always crying out for workers, and you don't have to go that far out of the cities to get work. I live and work in a rural town that's 60kms north of Melbourne's CBD, but you don't even have to come out this far. There's plenty of casual work out here - the pubs, the restaurants, cleaning work - and to be honest that's what your WHV is designed for: menial labour that gives you enough cash to keep holidaying.

    So What's Still Busy?

    Healthcare

    I'm going to start with an industry I know and work in. We are still crying out for nurses. Nursing is a popular educational choice with girls in Australia, but there is still a shortfall of nurses with higher qualifications. I work in a very small rural hospital, and we still have agency girls and guys in, covering shifts every single week. We can't do without them.

    Australia has a lot of elderly people, and a lot of small children (thanks to the baby-bribe - the government here pays people a few thousand dollars when they have a new baby - I think it's $5,000. The idea is that the money acts as an incentive for young couples to have a child because it makes the first financial year a bit easier. In reality, bogans squeeze out another child and buy a flatscreen TV.) We are still short on aged care staff and child care staff, but you may have trouble making your qualifications match the requirements for working.

    (I know Crumble Froo has looked for work in the care sector so I'm hoping she can offer some insight on this.)

    The most important thing you need to remember if you're going to work in healthcare is you need to be able to drive. A big onus is placed on driving in Australia - distances are so great, the agency/employer wants to know that you can get where they want to send you with ease. You may still be able to get work if you're not driving, but your options will be restricted.

    So that's healthcare - still hiring! Please share if you work in an industry where you know pretty well that people are/aren't hiring.
    Tagged:


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 339 ✭✭ myhorse


    Minesajackdaniels,
    Fantastic post. Moved me it did (well enough to register and post and I only post on one other forum and its an aussie one ..does that count?).

    Been overrun with media coverage of our young lads and lassies emigrating(it seems whv's now equate to emigrating). Please people read the OP and remember its a holiday (a great one) and just that in the present climate.

    While a few may get lucky with sponsorship , and all that goes with it 28 days etc, the vast vast majority wont. The labour pool that Australia has is huge and in some cases ,I stress some, well qualified. They can pick and choose. Not only for its own little bruces and brucettes but also from overseas. For some it begins when their parents send them over and fork out a fortune for them to be educated in an Australian seat of learning (they exist seemingly).

    Please think long and hard if you want a holiday and a great experience or a new start? The former is possible the latter extremely tough. The Aussies bless their little cotton socks are well used to the influx of Irish and others to their shores and know how to play the game at this stage with whv people.
    Please please ask yourselves before you come - what will I do when I return in 1 years time (or I believe you get another year free if you pick up some apples for the lazy Aussie oiks). If your answer is "well I wont be returning loike coz I am going to work real hard over there and they will keep me" then please rethink.
    If you still go then be ready (and this is where I get real serious) for getting a few days here and there work wise. The rest will be spent looking for work, relaxing on the beach (does get boring especially in August brrrrr) or bricking it regarding money.
    There will be exceptions but thats all - exceptions. Many are called but few are etc etc

    Hope I havent bored or been banned. Feel free to ask me anything, pm me or send me saucy pics


    my backround
    whv 1994-1995
    returned home and worked.
    applied for residency 1999
    received residency 2001 (oh yeah was 2 yrs in those days. you may remember the tortise beating the australian visa processing dept in the olympic 100 metres in 2000)
    moved back to sidknee 2001 and stayed till 2004. got me a passport thingy though with animals on the front.
    moving back to sidknee June of this year (I like to buck the trend) but I do have the passport (with animals etc on the front)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,391 One Cold Hand


    Good idea for a thread Majd. A lot of people at home do think that there's jobs galore in Oz, which isn't the case.

    I'm an Architect. There is basically no job here in this industry. I'm lucky to be holding onto mine. It's not as bad as Ireland, there is the odd job knocking about, but as Majd outlined, there are far more Aussies going for these jobs than there were 12 months ago, so someone on a WHV stands no chance.

    As for the rest of the industry, ie. Tradies etc, I gather it's a fairly similar situation. There's the odd job about, but you'd be lucky to pick one up.

    Oh, and this is the case in Melbourne. Maybe Perth, Sydney or Brissie are different, but I gather they are fairly similar.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,527 ✭✭✭ brendansmith


    Good idea for a thread Majd. A lot of people at home do think that there's jobs galore in Oz, which isn't the case.

    I'm an Architect. There is basically no job here in this industry. I'm lucky to be holding onto mine. It's not as bad as Ireland, there is the odd job knocking about, but as Majd outlined, there are far more Aussies going for these jobs than there were 12 months ago, so someone on a WHV stands no chance.

    As for the rest of the industry, ie. Tradies etc, I gather it's a fairly similar situation. There's the odd job about, but you'd be lucky to pick one up.

    Oh, and this is the case in Melbourne. Maybe Perth, Sydney or Brissie are different, but I gather they are fairly similar.

    Yep all the talk has become a reality. The market has frozen. There are very few jobs to be got.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,881 Diamondmaker


    We are a mid size builders at the coal face of the construction industry in SE Qld.. We have a large job on the Gold Coast going and there is a lot of keen interest from subbies to be on it. There is a definite and clear lack of work at the minute for all.

    Jobs that we have won are tied up in final contract negotiations, due to financing or cost cutting and others post tender are like wise tied up similarly.

    I am doing a Woolworths project on the Sunshine coast, like wise I am picking from a large pool of tenderers and am always able to play subbies of each other to grind out the best price, it is the best I have had it ever in a decade from this regard. I receive many cold calls randomly chasing work and am treated very well by the people that are working for us, as they want to be kept in the loop for any other work.

    Many subbies and builders will be going bust over the next while. We have not laid off any people but have not had a new tender through the door in months and may have to soon. We certainly will not be recruiting.

    I cant see any similar builders recruiting at the minute apart form isolated incidents, where a very large job has just been picked up.
    We are in a particularry good sitaution, being part of a large national company, with many other business interests, that should be capable of weathering this storm, better than a lone, Brisbane based outfit for example.

    We are tendering weekly 2 or 3 jobs and the data on returned tenders is suicidal. Jobs are being won ( BOUGHT ) at half the pice of other tenderers.

    The crunch is particulaly being felt by subcontractors at the minute as their contracts tend not to last as long as a main builders. At least when we pick up a job it can last about a year or more. Tradies can be out of work in weeks or only pick up very casual work. I have heard of many instances of traides being let go at no notice and stories of poor payment, no payemnt, general being screwed around by subbies. Be Aware.....

    Suppliers are also showing a lack of trust in builders credit worthiness, spurred by the spate of bankruptcies. They enforcing strict credit checks or requesting cash depostis prior to supply of goods.

    I concur with everything MinesaJD says with regard to pupose of a WHV and residency.

    Overall current outlook is not good if you are looking for work. This changed for the worse drastically since Christmas.


  • Registered Users Posts: 54 ✭✭✭ Mobooo


    I think we all know how bad things are i was wondering can someone post a positive message?


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10,382 ✭✭✭✭ watna


    Well, I work for a life insurance company. This is an industry that does not do too bad in recession in general (but obviously doesn't do fabulously!). We offer credit card protection and income protection (amongst other things) and those products are more in demand as people start to feel unsure about the security of their jobs.

    There are certain skills in the insurance industry that are in demand. e.g. claims processors and especially life underwriters. If you have life underwriting experience you will get a job in NZ in a matter of days. There's a huge shortage in the country and we've had to recruit from abroad. I think general underwriting experience is also quite in demand.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,881 Diamondmaker


    Mobooo wrote: »
    I think we all know how bad things are i was wondering can someone post a positive message?

    Good work for dentists and litigation lawyers are doing ok too.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,333 Zambia


    Mobooo wrote: »
    I think we all know how bad things are i was wondering can someone post a positive message?

    Ask the question in Dublin at present, from the calls My ma makmes you would swear people are eating their own young and burning the elderly for firewood back in Ireland. :eek:

    Jacks original post should be handed out outside these expos, we are here on the ground and know what its like. I only got a job this week after 4 months on the ground and I have a PR visa.

    I work in security here and WHV's are un-employable by law, they cannot be licenced by Vic Pol. We do have jobs for crowd controllers(Doormen) but you would need experience as well as a licence.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 136 ✭✭ Derek B


    I work in IT, internet marketing to be specific, and my company has put a freeze on hiring for the moment. Our jobs rely on retaining clients from all verticals, many of whom are affected by budget cuts and the first thing that gets slashed in harsh times as many may know is marketing budgets.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,863 seachto7


    Derek B wrote: »
    I work in IT, internet marketing to be specific, and my company has put a freeze on hiring for the moment. Our jobs rely on retaining clients from all verticals, many of whom are affected by budget cuts and the first thing that gets slashed in harsh times as many may know is marketing budgets.

    Funnily enough, I work in internet marketing in Ireland and we are turning down work, hired 2 people already this year with another to join in a few months, are hiring for other positions, and while some clients are rethinking their budgets, we are turning down the work...


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,016 ✭✭✭ Rowley Birkin QC


    I'm guessing things aren't great for Spatial Planners either then?


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 7,050 ✭✭✭ Mahatma coat


    Construction seems to be motorin along in SEQ still

    I'm in the forestry and millin game, we are seein a surge in sales recently, granted its the cheaper stuff but we are shiftin a lot of it

    diamondMaker, why you not buy Timber from me :(:(:(:confused:


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 12,457 ✭✭✭✭ Mr Benevolent


    B*ll*cks. The GF is off to Oz in 4 months and me in 6 months. A chef (with no experience) and general admin/insurance/callcentre bod respectively. I think it's gonna turn into an impromptu holiday... :(


  • Registered Users Posts: 54 ✭✭✭ Mobooo


    I think chefs still have a bit of work from what i hear, you should go to melbourne but there is very little pay in it but you will get a job


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,881 Diamondmaker


    Construction seems to be motorin along in SEQ still

    I'm in the forestry and millin game, we are seein a surge in sales recently, granted its the cheaper stuff but we are shiftin a lot of it

    diamondMaker, why you not buy Timber from me :(:(:(:confused:

    Thats unusual, all signs point to the contrary. Even the countries biggest developer Bovis LL, let ~1200 go yesty.

    Ray White like wise culled loads a few months ago ( My GF was one ) and are continuing.

    Raptis went bust a few months ago.

    Matrix is reportedly in trouble and I think ( correct me if I am wrong Hutchies let a few go also recently )

    My GF works for CBRE they have let many go over a few rounds recently, even culled several directors.

    The next phase down from developers ( RW and BLL ) culling numvers is that the builders expericne it next and then the suppliers and subbies......


  • Registered Users Posts: 630 Claasman


    correct me if I am wrong Hutchies let a few go also recently

    ......


    yeah, they did here in Brisbane.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,218 ✭✭✭ 20 Times 20 Times


    Just to make you aware of now. The three month limit for working for one employer changed a year or two ago. You can work for one employer for a period of six months now.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,658 ✭✭✭✭ The Sweeper


    Also, if you go for a second WHV, you may return to work for a previous employer for another six months.

    The six month limit opens up the opportunity to take a contract job for up to six months and make some money, but the attractiveness of a backpacker for a contract position is questionable.

    Again, I'm repeating things I've posted on other threads, but still. A good friend of mine lives up in Townsville. She moved down here probably nearly 10 years ago now. When she got here first, she could not get a job for love nor money. She started off in Melbourne with good qualifications, good experience, PLUS she was on a spouse visa, so she had no contract time limits.

    One day a kind-hearted recruitment consultant, Melbourne-based, took her for a coffee and told her outside in the cafe what she couldn't say in the office: she wasn't getting work because she was Irish. At the time, there was a glut of backpackers visiting Australia on WHVs. At the time the three month limit was in place. These folks were taking three month contracts and pissing off after four to six weeks because they'd made enough money to fund whatever it is they wanted to do - white water rafting, driving the great ocean road, the Whitsundays, whatever. Subsequently the recruitment agent's big clients were telling the agency they didn't want any backpackers - and because lots of backpackers were Irish, that had spilled over into 'no Irish'.

    That's not to say that companies currently are racially discriminating against you because you're Irish. But against an ever-growing pool of candidates with long-term residency or citizenship, backpackers of all nationalities are losing out.

    Again we're back to what the WHV is for, what the economic climate is like, and how advisable it is to take a one year holiday in the middle of a recession, especially if you're leaving financial commitments like mortgages or loans behind in Ireland, with the idea that you can make money in Australia to pay those...


  • Registered Users Posts: 630 Claasman


    One day a kind-hearted recruitment consultant, Melbourne-based, took her for a coffee and told her outside in the cafe what she couldn't say in the office: she wasn't getting work because she was Irish. ...

    I'm finding this now in Brisbane, espicially for casual work. IMO and from speaking to others looking for casual work, Aussies prefer to give the job to an Aussie now, espicially in these times of recession and seeing as unemployment is rising here (and who can blame them)...

    doesn't bode well for people on WHV's


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13 ✭✭✭ eye_q


    Great Post so felt compelled to put in my 2 cents.
    Im currently working in Melbourne on a WHV as a Water Design Engineer (transfer/pipelines) for a large multi national Engineering consultancy as are a number of my friends.
    I began work here at the start of October with the view to going on to sponsorship (due to the worrying state of affairs at home). It took me 6 weeks from arriving to find a job and start work, now it seems I was one of the luck ones, getting in just before things tightened up here. When I commenced there was sponsorship on the cards but we agreed that we would leave it for a few months to make sure both i and the company were happy with each other (also so i wouldn't be stuck with the 28 day deadline should things not work out), however over Christmas the situation in engineering consultancies seems to change dramatically. 50 staff were let go in our office and I have heard of voluntary 4 day weeks been worked in EDAW, Hyder and Wooley Parsons (Brisbane office) so as no more staff need be let go following redundancies being made in them all. GHD just announced 300 redundancies and there are employment freezes with a good few of the other big companies, in the areas of Water, sustainability, environment and transport.
    I knew by Christmas that sponsorship was no longer on the cards so Im currently finishing up my 6 months allowed and have been on the look out for more work for the last 4 weeks. Unfortunately it seems quite scarce (definitely no sponsorship roles in the Melbourne). I have been talking to a number of recruiters and HR departments and it seems that there is now alot of competition for roles and unfortunately us WHV'ers are bottom of the barrel due to sponsorship costs (flights, health care, recruiter finders fee)
    If you are involved in Power there seems to be work but in my area of Water transfer, within the cities it appears most of the major consultancies are scaling down for the moment.
    The other option I am looking at is applying for a 4 yr resident Visa (approx $2000) as this would negate the problem with "Australian resident only" i come across on alot of Job applications however it is a risk as it takes minimum 9 months to process and the situation then could be dismal (or "Dublin" as my mother puts it!).
    Hopefully something will come up here but consideration should really be given to finding employment/sponsorship before leaving Ireland if possible , however this is sometimes only really an option for those working in very Specific areas/skills in engineering consultancies (eg tunneling) .

    Hope this Helps , and if I get more work or the situation improves I'll update.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 50 ✭✭✭ Tea Leaf


    I'm finding this now in Brisbane, espicially for casual work. IMO and from speaking to others looking for casual work, Aussies prefer to give the job to an Aussie now, espicially in these times of recession and seeing as unemployment is rising here (and who can blame them)...

    doesn't bode well for people on WHV's

    What a load of rubbish.
    That is just absolute and unmitigated crapola.
    Firstly, Australia is not in a recession.
    Secondly, as the numbers sit right now, Australia is not heading for a recession. Yes, I know - this bursts the bubbles of the doom and gloom lovers but the pages of the papers are still full of jobs, percentage rates for all mortgages have dropped 1% (for the second time in 12 months mind you) and the fashion, construction, food and drink business is booming.

    Thirdly,people who want to work will get work. Moreover, they'll retain the work too.

    This is something I have found when working all over Australia be ye black, white, brindle, Irish, Pakistani, whatever. Using the "Irish tag" is an excuse to whinge.

    And ye won't get any work doing that either.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,527 ✭✭✭ brendansmith


    Tea Leaf wrote: »
    What a load of rubbish.
    That is just absolute and unmitigated crapola.
    Firstly, Australia is not in a recession.
    Secondly, as the numbers sit right now, Australia is not heading for a recession. Yes, I know - this bursts the bubbles of the doom and gloom lovers but the pages of the papers are still full of jobs, percentage rates for all mortgages have dropped 1% (for the second time in 12 months mind you) and the fashion, construction, food and drink business is booming.

    Thirdly,people who want to work will get work. Moreover, they'll retain the work too.

    This is something I have found when working all over Australia be ye black, white, brindle, Irish, Pakistani, whatever. Using the "Irish tag" is an excuse to whinge.

    And ye won't get any work doing that either.

    Im afraid the construction industry is not booming. They are closing their doors in a big way. Hopefully its only short term but the fact remains.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 50 ✭✭✭ Tea Leaf


    Current job hot spots in Adelaide at the moment:

    - barista/coffee makers (Ireland being the winning nation of the recent Championships in Demark means that Ireland is definitely on the coffee map);

    - bartenders, cooks and associated trades in hospitality - positively booming at the moment;

    - coaching assistants - for those who have played or play a sport professionally, there is an increasing penchant to hire those with international experience;

    - mining engineers and associated trades - Matsui is setting up its uranium gig in South Australia and the hunt is on;

    - Marine engineers and associated trades - Defence contracts and private civil contracts are in progress; 20 apprentices were put on last month;

    - teaching, particularly special education;


    Hot spots in Brisbane at the moment:

    - Barista/coffee maker - the market for coffee has opened right up;

    - Law - environment & planning; property; family. If you're a criminal lawyer, please stay at home.

    - Legal Secretaries - this often doubles as 'paralegal' as the rate of pay is often the same unless specified - commercial, family, property law areas are booming;

    - Construction and allied trades; current stage of ongoing road project worth 400 million dollars in early stages - this involves a series of tunnels, over passes, roads, bridges and roundabouts so experience in all of these concrete structures is very important. This doesn't include associated housing projects whereby builders, brickies, welders, ironworkers etc are all required. (You must be ticketed up though).

    - Hospitality and allied trades - not so much for chefs but certainly for cooks and food and bevvie people; corporate catering is big too.

    www.seek.com.au
    www.mycareer.com.au

    are good sites to check out but bear in mind that there's a very large hidden market in Australia. Just be aware that the above spots are hot spots, not the only spots. Cold calling and door knocking with a slick interview style can get you ANYWHERE.

    Those who say there isn't, haven't tried.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,527 ✭✭✭ brendansmith


    Tea Leaf wrote: »
    - Construction and allied trades;
    :rolleyes:


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,333 Zambia


    Ah come on tea you cant go quoting seek and thinking everything is rosy granted its by no means as bad as it could be but. Someone does not walk of the plane and become a barista.

    Plus in your own post you contradict your self

    bartenders, cooks and associated trades in hospitality - positively booming at the moment;

    Hospitality and allied trades - not so much for chefs but certainly for cooks and food and bevvie people; corporate catering is big too.

    Granted in all cases I agree if you put the leg work in you could get something but it is by no means easy.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 50 ✭✭✭ Tea Leaf


    Where did I say it was all easy?

    A chef is a person who heads the kitchen. Often this does not involve cooking but this depends on the establishment.

    A cook is a person who always cooks the food.

    The two are very different jobs with very different processes and, of course, very different pay, hence the two words are not one and the same thing :)

    The Seek site is a very good site and worth the look. I was just recommending that people not be totally reliant on it as there are plenty of jobs avaiable that aren't advertised.

    Blind Freddy can see that I wasn't quoting from it.

    Those who say I am, haven't looked.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 50 ✭✭✭ Tea Leaf


    And compared to other countries in the world right now like Ireland, US, UK, India, China, Taiwan, Japan etc, Australia IS feckin' rosy! :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 40,848 ✭✭✭✭ Xavi6


    Tea Leaf wrote: »
    And compared to other countries in the world right now like Ireland, US, UK, India, China, Taiwan, Japan etc, Australia IS feckin' rosy! :D

    Not for much longer.

    A few months ago I would have told everyone to up sticks and head over here. Now I'm sure that forking all that cash for flights, visas and whatever else would be worth it.

    Australia may not currently be in a recession officially but it's not far off.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,333 Zambia


    Tea Leaf wrote: »
    Where did I say it was all easy?

    A chef is a person who heads the kitchen. Often this does not involve cooking but this depends on the establishment.

    A cook is a person who always cooks the food.

    The two are very different jobs with very different processes and, of course, very different pay, hence the two words are not one and the same thing :)

    The Seek site is a very good site and worth the look. I was just recommending that people not be totally reliant on it as there are plenty of jobs avaiable that aren't advertised.

    Blind Freddy can see that I wasn't quoting from it.

    Those who say I am, haven't looked.

    Come on chief you cant list a load of proffesions you say that are crying out for staff and not expect people to think that its easy to walk into a job. You did not say it was easy but the idea was tempting.

    If there are jobs for cooks there are jobs for chefs as a chef can easily be a cook. But we digress , as both go with your overall opinion.

    Seek is good but I find a lot of the jobs on it lead nowhere... My arrival here was deleyed by a few months and it cost me dearly in job availibilty.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,881 Diamondmaker


    Tea Leaf wrote: »
    and the fashion, construction, food and drink business is booming.

    .

    Wrong, you are completely wrong !! Try telling that to the father of 3 I just saw get let go this morning !

    I have preivously listed thousands of jobs lost in the last few weeks by to builders and developers.

    Other poster just added 300 at GHD and my company shed dozebns across across the rest of our national offices.

    Constrcution is NOT booming, I can refer you to our company CEO if you dont believe me. We have businesses in construction and developmet in ACT, NSW, NT, Qld and Vic, Hing Kong and Singapore.


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