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My college course... (A 3rd-level student's insight)

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 16 LifeasaPigeon


    k88 wrote: »
    Thanks so much! Another quick question if you don't mind, how did you find the exams compared to LC exams? I know they're obviously different but for me anyway, I always did well in small exams based on a few chapters rather than an actual full paper covering everything.

    No problem at all :) the exams are certainly more manageable than the LC, though of course do require a fair but of work. All of my biology exams were multiple choice,which certainly helps, though some had negative marking (so you would get +1 mark for a right answer, and -0.25 marks for a wrong answer, for example). The maths modules are perfectly doable, and much easier than the LC in the aspect that they are more focused on one area; linear algebra in the first semester and calculus in the second semester, and are not too much more in depth, though linear algebra does have some new concepts. Chemistry exams are a little tougher but past exam papers give a really good idea of what to expect. The best thing is that each exam examines only 12 weeks worth of material, nothing like the 2 years worth of the LC! Also continuous assessment is a godsend, you'll have anywhere from 15% to 75% (in my experience) of your modules already assessed before the final exam, from labs, assignments and mid-term exams, which takes off an awful lot of pressure :) and not all modules have a final exam as they are 100% continuous assessment, so you'll have at most 6 exams a semester, but sometimes less. I had 5 each semester :)

    Also, exams are either 1 or 2 hours long. :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,271 ✭✭✭ Elemonator


    No problem at all :) the exams are certainly more manageable than the LC, though of course do require a fair but of work. All of my biology exams were multiple choice,which certainly helps, though some had negative marking (so you would get +1 mark for a right answer, and -0.25 marks for a wrong answer, for example). The maths modules are perfectly doable, and much easier than the LC in the aspect that they are more focused on one area; linear algebra in the first semester and calculus in the second semester, and are not too much more in depth, though linear algebra does have some new concepts. Chemistry exams are a little tougher but past exam papers give a really good idea of what to expect. The best thing is that each exam examines only 12 weeks worth of material, nothing like the 2 years worth of the LC! Also continuous assessment is a godsend, you'll have anywhere from 15% to 75% (in my experience) of your modules already assessed before the final exam, from labs, assignments and mid-term exams, which takes off an awful lot of pressure :) and not all modules have a final exam as they are 100% continuous assessment, so you'll have at most 6 exams a semester, but sometimes less. I had 5 each semester :)

    Also, exams are either 1 or 2 hours long. :)

    How good would you need to be at maths for UCD science ideally?


  • Registered Users Posts: 274 ✭✭ 2thousand14


    The Grimm wrote: »
    Sorry everyone, I have posted this a few times but in the wrong place.......

    I am interested in doing an undenominated engineering course in either UCD, NUIG, UL, UCC or Trinity and was wondering does anyone have any feedback? Are all the colleges considered equally as good? Or does any of the colleges specialise particularly well in that field?

    NUIG includes computer science so that's a plus as I think this is an area I might be interested in.

    Does it matter which college you have obtained your degree when going for a job?

    Any feedback gratefully accepted good, bad or indifferent? I have no preference as to where I will do the degree but would love to hear other experiences so I can choose.

    Thanks

    I have just completed first year of the Undenominated course in NUIG. what would you like to know?


  • Registered Users Posts: 12 ✭✭✭ Fionarose


    Would you mind telling me how many points you got to get on this coursr, did you hear of many that didnt get on it, thanks.


  • Registered Users Posts: 57 ✭✭✭ nerd95


    Elemonator wrote: »
    How good would you need to be at maths for UCD science ideally?

    I just finished first year in UCD science and based on my experiences you wouldn't need to have a ridiculously high standard of maths. There are a lot of students who come into the course with ordinary level maths and they manage perfectly fine. They also have an introduction to maths module in semester 1 for those who did not achieve a minimum of a C at higher level or an A at ordinary level in the LC. According to people in my course it is a nice module because you start off going through the basics again (even going through fractions) and you supposedly build your way up. Also, in the Linear Algebra module, it is taught using a lot of matrices which is unlike the LC so everyone is on the same page (i.e everyone is basically learning it for the first time).


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,625 ✭✭✭ gline


    nerd95 wrote: »
    I just finished first year in UCD science and based on my experiences you wouldn't need to have a ridiculously high standard of maths. There are a lot of students who come into the course with ordinary level maths and they manage perfectly fine. They also have an introduction to maths module in semester 1 for those who did not achieve a minimum of a C at higher level or an A at ordinary level in the LC. According to people in my course it is a nice module because you start off going through the basics again (even going through fractions) and you supposedly build your way up. Also, in the Linear Algebra module, it is taught using a lot of matrices which is unlike the LC so everyone is on the same page (i.e everyone is basically learning it for the first time).

    I did that intro to math course 2 years ago, its great, it starts from the very basics. I got through with a very low initial maths level (hadnt done any maths in 10+ years), so even with ordinary level maths you will be fine.

    The linear algebra was tricky, but you dont have to do that until second year.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16 LifeasaPigeon


    The UCD Science course was 515 points last year, up from 505 (I think) the year before, so I'd say some people were caught out but not any that I know of! :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 3 bosher911


    Hi, im struggling with the order for my cao. I want to do computer science and I have UCD first at the minute. I cannot decide what is the next best course, TCD, DIT or NUIM? TCD computer science is a good course but leaves you with an arts degree which may not be the most favorable when looking for work, DIT computer science is accredited by the british engineers society and seems like a practical based course and NUIM computer science and software engineering seems to be good for software developement and it has a new computer science department? If anyone can give me any further information or share knowledge which is the best course please let me know, Thank you in advance!


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,899 ✭✭✭ ronivek


    Don't worry about the fact the TCD degree isn't a Bachelor of Science; employers and/or other universities will not be concerned either way. In actual fact I'm pretty sure TCD Computer Science is an integrated MSc. program now anyway so you'll end up with a Masters in Computer Science at the end of it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 43 ✭✭✭ k88


    No problem at all :) the exams are certainly more manageable than the LC, though of course do require a fair but of work. All of my biology exams were multiple choice,which certainly helps, though some had negative marking (so you would get +1 mark for a right answer, and -0.25 marks for a wrong answer, for example). The maths modules are perfectly doable, and much easier than the LC in the aspect that they are more focused on one area; linear algebra in the first semester and calculus in the second semester, and are not too much more in depth, though linear algebra does have some new concepts. Chemistry exams are a little tougher but past exam papers give a really good idea of what to expect. The best thing is that each exam examines only 12 weeks worth of material, nothing like the 2 years worth of the LC! Also continuous assessment is a godsend, you'll have anywhere from 15% to 75% (in my experience) of your modules already assessed before the final exam, from labs, assignments and mid-term exams, which takes off an awful lot of pressure :) and not all modules have a final exam as they are 100% continuous assessment, so you'll have at most 6 exams a semester, but sometimes less. I had 5 each semester :)

    Also, exams are either 1 or 2 hours long. :)

    This helped so much, thank you! :)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 26 ✭✭✭ Heyzelx


    Has/does anybody here study occupational therapy (preferably UCC but doesn't matter), and if so could you please PM me I have a few questions? Thanks.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14 ✭✭✭ radepoju


    anyone have any information on arts in UCD? The subjects I plan on doing are French, Spanish and linguistics :) thanks in advance


  • Registered Users Posts: 30 ✭✭✭ ConorR32


    bosher911 wrote: »
    Hi, im struggling with the order for my cao. I want to do computer science and I have UCD first at the minute. I cannot decide what is the next best course, TCD, DIT or NUIM? TCD computer science is a good course but leaves you with an arts degree which may not be the most favorable when looking for work, DIT computer science is accredited by the british engineers society and seems like a practical based course and NUIM computer science and software engineering seems to be good for software developement and it has a new computer science department? If anyone can give me any further information or share knowledge which is the best course please let me know, Thank you in advance!

    The TCD BA thing is a total non-issue, it's just a tradition and has nothing to do with the degree content. It will not affect your employability in any way whatsoever. TCD Computer Science is now a 5 year embedded MSc program (Level 9), most go on to finish the full 5 years as far as I know.

    TCD is Number 1 in Ireland for Computer Science according to this year's QS rankings, with UCD coming third behind NUIG. Not only this, TCD have consistently remained head and shoulders above all others in the QS rankings over the years. However, I would definitely take the rankings with a pinch of salt.

    Personally I'm a 2nd Year Science student at TCD, so all of my advice is coming from what I've heard from friends and the internet. I really love TCD so far, it's like a small community really, location is perfect and student life here is in my opinion, unrivalled.

    Hope that helped and good luck with the results! :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,133 ✭✭✭ EoghanIRL


    Ok,well I have got a good few PMs about this so I thought I would provide a little bit of information on my course here.

    Course: Dentistry

    So this is going to be mainly about the first year and a little bit about the other years.

    So BDS1 and 2 are pre-clinical years mainly focusing on medical sciences such as anatomy,physiology, biochemistry,pathology,pharmacology,clinical modules such as dental surgery and restorative dentistry.

    BDS 3-5 are clinical years spent in the hospital with some lectures in pharmacology and pathology.

    So the first two years are important in forming a strong background knowledge on which you further develop your skills over the years.
    In first year you take - 2 anatomy , 2 physiology, 1 biochem and 2 dental surgery modules.

    Topographical anatomy focuses mainly on the lungs up - head and neck in detail. Expect to learn in detail - bones, muscles, blood vessels ,nerves etc.. You also have weekly 2 hour sessions with the cadavers. There are also a few clinical anatomy lectures.
    There is also one systemic anatomy modules which focuses on the different systems. It is an easy module compared to topo anatomy.

    There are two physiology modules. The first module starts from the start covering basic physiology and then moving on to studying the cardiovascular system in detail.
    The second module will focus in detail on the digestive, respiratory and renal system with a few other pieces too.
    There are a few hours of labs.

    Biochemistry is an interesting module.
    It is split into biomolecues and then metabolism (in detail :( )
    There is also 2 hours of dental biochemistry a week which I found very interesting. It deals with the biochemistry of oral health and development. It also backs up the main core parts of the module.
    I would definitely recommend keeping up with this module as it can become overwhelming. Use lipincott biochem if you get stuck or lehringer if you have the time.

    There are two dental surgery modules which deal with fundamental things but none the less has a lot in it.
    There is general dental practice, psychology/behavioral science, material science lectures + labs,orthodontics,public health , epidemiology etc..
    The first module has a normal exam and the second module is assessed in the form of an oral. You even get to be all dressed up in a shirt and tie!

    That really is the bones of the first year modules.
    There is a lot in it but the time table is quite fair leaving lots of time to keep up with it. First class honors is definitely achievable but expect to work for it!

    Other than that there are a couple of events to look forward to during the year. The main event is dent ball which was a fun night out and there are other competitions throughout the year such as DentCup.

    The class size is small(approx 50). A large proportion of the class is made up of international students - mainly from Canada,Singapore,Australia etc.. There are also a couple of mature students. The rest is made up of traditional CAO applicants.

    Some of the exams are tough. They are much tougher than the leaving cert exams and you won't be used to the format - mcqs,emqs etc .
    And negative marking can be a _____ :) . The pass mark is 10 % higher for all courses in the medicine and health faculty -50 %. This catches a lot of people. Also there are continuous assessments in some modules which are useful for gaining points before you ever sit the exams. First year is split into two semesters. Second year onward consists of trimesters with clinical attachments in the third semester which is during the summer.

    The course is interesting and challenging if that is what you want.
    If you want to do well then it certainly requires study and it isn't a walk in the park.

    This is really a guide for the first year.
    I will update this yearly if there is an interest.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ Lottie16


    How do I search this forum thanks!


  • Registered Users Posts: 11 ✭✭✭ Seanie3513


    Anybody anything on nursing or auctioneering valuation amd estate agency dit


  • Registered Users Posts: 6 ✭✭✭ Girarfe


    Hey there,

    I'm doing general nursing in DCU.

    my advice, if you're thinking of doing nursing go to DCU because after you complete your 4years, you end up with a BSc. degree (bachelor of Science), this is better if you want to branch out of nursing totally yet stay in the science/ health field.

    TCD offers a BNS. degree which is a bachelor of nursing studies so if you want to continue your education you will have to keep within the nursing field.

    The DCU degree is harder and has more assignments but it's better.

    I'm only saying this because, I am 3years into my nursing degree and I absolutely don't want to be a nurse anymore, I'm sticking it out and will use my degree to branch out into something else, not nursing. You see, this could happen to any of you thinking of becomming a nurse, you may end up 3years in2 your course and decide you don't want to be a nurse either.

    Oh and ALSO- if you aspire to become a doctor but maybe you don't think or wont get the points, then apply to do a BSc in general nursing,get a 2.1 in your degree and after that there is a 3year course in medicine.

    You see, there's always other ways;)

    I know this post is 9 years old, but does anyone know if the bit about the BSN from Trinity and BSc from dcu is still true about studying something else after nursing?
    From looking online it looks to me like nursing is now 'Bsc (Cur.).' in Trinity but I'm not too sure.


  • Registered Users Posts: 175 ✭✭ matthew1998


    Lottie16 wrote: »
    How do I search this forum thanks!

    Under the menu to select pages the should be a button saying "search this thread"


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,823 DublinArnie


    Only two weeks left until I finish first year engineering at Trinity College Dublin. So thought I'd give some pointers and information for people thinking about this course.

    Hours: 9am - 6pm most days, although there are some long breaks 2,3,4 hour breaks along the week. Quite nice since it forces you to study in college or get involved with societies. I believe there is 27 hour in total in the week (usually 6 hours of labs, and labs aren't on every week). There is more information of the hours on the website.

    Course Content: Some people find it too easy, and others too difficult. What can put people off is the chemistry in first semester, as it is quite heavy compared to LC. This chemistry module is among one of the worst in the entire course, everyone hates it and there are reasons. The maths modules are nice and make you think. There is a programming module, a drawing module, professional engineering (ethics n stuff) and so on. There is a lot of module information on the website! What I recommend is that you do some applied maths and chemistry over the summer, just the basics, because the basics are brushed over in days, and this throws people who haven't done them two subjects off.

    Campus: Very nice, but the tourists do get annoying because they get in the way. Very compact campus and everyday I walk in, I feel like I'm discovering a new route/building/room. The gym isn't too bad either - depending the time and your routine.

    Social life and culture: I spend 80% of my time in college involved with stuff outside my course. There is so much to do! There are nights out every day if you know where to look, and there are always random events on. I remember during Fresher's Week I got roped into doing a random french quiz... and I don't know french!

    If I could pick again, would I pick Engineering TCD? To be honest, I wouldn't. The course has a lot of problems, and the department is quite outdated and seeped in tradition. My interest is aeronautical, I should of picked Limerick but if I was going to stay in Dublin, then UCD. Although the course is nice and I'm not complaining, but it is also renowned for it's problems among the engineering side of things. Trinity is more for the Arts and Humanities, not technical degrees.

    If you want any more information, PM me! :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 501 ✭✭✭ SkepticQuark


    So guess I'll post here too, currently doing Mathematics and Physics in UL and also coming to the end of 1st year. Please note though to get into this course now you must enter it through the Maths or Physics general entry courses (I hope you'll have already found out about this, though).

    In terms of hours you'll be pretty much 9am-6pm a lot of the time although it varies a lot, so far though my usually 3/5 days, I'm in from 9am-6pm with our days being about as long as a normal school day. Although be aware you'll obviously be spending a lot of extra time getting to grips with course material, doing lab reports (there are a lot of them) etc.

    The content is as you can imagine very heavy on maths and physics. The course content will probably change though due to the changes made to the courses becoming part of a general entry but I'll go through what I did.

    In the first semester, we did a very general physics module that covered mechanics, heat, magnetism and electricity (PH4131) which is basically like your higher level LC physics content with some more details and a few new concepts. There was a Computer Software module that focused on learning the basics of Java (CE4701), lecturer for this is really nice by the way and the ability to problem solve via programming will serve you well in the long run. Another physics module was titled "Measurement and Properties of Matter", although be aware it contains a lot more than that. In that module, we worked a lot with an Arduino Uno which was a lot of fun and let us mess around with C. In terms of maths we had calculus I which was extremely abstract so don't think it's basically LC calculus (parts of it are but a lot of it won't seem familiar at all) and we also had linear algebra which is nice but just takes a lot of practice.

    In the second semester, we've continued with another general physics module that moves onto things like light and waves (PH4102). Our other physics module is semiconductors (PH4092) which I'm honestly finding difficult to grasp in terms of its theory (the practical side in the labs is very valuable for that reason). Our maths modules continue on with Calculus (MS4022), Linear Algebra (MS4122) and we also have one in Statistics and Probability (MS4222) which is very much LC content until the last few weeks. A lot of people in my course, including myself, have also taken on Computer Software 2 (CE4702) since we all wanted to keep learning Java since the programming experience will definitely help when looking for employment (and it's a pretty fun module to do for the year).

    In general, pretty much all the lecturers are really nice and 100% approachable. While I'll tell you all to turn up to tutorials and labs, I personally have stopped going to semiconductor tutorials because the tutor we have is actually useless. Most of the tutors though provide an invaluable resource, especially ones in maths modules seeing as a lot of the content in those modules is extremely abstract and lecturers don't get the time to provide practical applications of the concepts they are introducing.

    In terms of exams, it's way less stressful than the LC. A lot of courses give around 20-40% in continuous assessment. Some maths modules even run on a 120% exam, 20% being your midterm and 100% being your final exam so it gives you a second chance should your midterm be a disaster.

    Class sizes, our group is only about 14 people so we all know each other (a few I don't know so well but I'd say at least 11 of them I can say I know well now). I'm very, very introverted so I'm probably not the best person to start talking about social life around UL, I'm sure other people have already shared their experiences. There's an Astronomy Society that's started up though so hopefully my excuse to go out and maybe meet people outside of my course. I will say though there is a society in UL for really anyone, tea lovers, gamers, debaters, the various forms of sporty people, people who like a particular brand of politics, sci-fi nerds etc.

    Maths and Physics was not my first choice last year (Mathematical Sciences in UL was) but I missed out due to not getting the B3 in HL maths. While I would have preferred Maths Science at the time (due to it having the option of going into computers fully later on), after a year I'm honestly really enjoying this course. For anyone with any interest in physics, it's definitely really cool to go to uni in the morning knowing you are going to do something cool be it learning about relativity or finally realising how a logic circuit you've built in a lab actually works. Also, it helps that you get that foundation and deep understanding of maths and an appreciation for computers. The course overall really lets you dabble in many areas within STEM and lets you be an all-rounder.

    Any particular questions just shoot me a PM. Also sorry it's so long, I know all of you should probably be busy studying when I've posted this (I hope you are anyway...). :P


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  • Registered Users Posts: 13 ✭✭✭ johnny112


    Course: Early Years and Childhood Studies
    College: UCC
    Points: 400

    Just finished first year of this three year course, the course is based on three disciplines psychology, social studies and education.
    The course is very interesting, in the first semester we undertook various modules like psychology as science, contemporary issues in early years, social policy and society etc.
    In second and third year there will be placement for 12 weeks (2 semesters) in both primary schools and early years settings, the course is great as it really gives you a feel to whether you would like to go primary teaching or not.
    The hours in sem 1 were about 12 in the week and 15 in sem 2, however especially in sem 2 there is a large emphasis on self directed learning, so you will be kept busy.
    Overall a very enjoyable course with excellent lectures and further study options.


  • Registered Users Posts: 27 ✭✭✭ Thatlcgirl


    Law Dual Degree - BCL/Maîtrise (NFQ Level 8)
    Full Time - Undergraduate Studies
    CAO Code: DN600
    CAO Points Range 2017: 525 - 615
    Length of Course: 4 Years
    Average Intake: 120

    Leaving Certificate:
    O6/H7 in English, Irish, a third language and three other recognised subjects

    *Note: In first year you study the BCL [Law with French Law]; in second year, students achieving the highest grades have the option to apply for interview to enter the BCL/ Maîtrise or to continue with the BCL [Law with French Law].

    Special Entry Recommendations

    Students will need a minimum grade H3 in LC French (or equivalent) to take the BCL (Law with French Law) course

    I was wondering is anyone has any advice on this course, I'm extremely interested in it! Thanks.


  • Registered Users Posts: 32 pokkyoc


    Thatlcgirl wrote: »
    Law Dual Degree - BCL/Maîtrise (NFQ Level 8)
    Full Time - Undergraduate Studies
    CAO Code: DN600
    CAO Points Range 2017: 525 - 615
    Length of Course: 4 Years
    Average Intake: 120

    Leaving Certificate:
    O6/H7 in English, Irish, a third language and three other recognised subjects

    *Note: In first year you study the BCL [Law with French Law]; in second year, students achieving the highest grades have the option to apply for interview to enter the BCL/ Maîtrise or to continue with the BCL [Law with French Law].

    Special Entry Recommendations

    Students will need a minimum grade H3 in LC French (or equivalent) to take the BCL (Law with French Law) course

    I was wondering is anyone has any advice on this course, I'm extremely interested in it! Thanks.

    Absolutely! I'm a penultimate year student in BCL/Maîtrise and will be heading into my final year in Paris in October. Please message me if you have any questions.

    Structure of the Course
    BCL/Maîtrise is an interdisciplinary dual law degree programme in which successful graduates obtain a Bachelor of Civil Law (BCL) and French law degrees Licence en droit and Maîtrise en droit (Master 1). These are qualifying law degrees in both Ireland and France. Students spend Years 1 and 2 in UCD and Years 3 and 4 at either Panthéon-Assas University (Paris II) or Toulouse I University Capitole.

    In France, Irish students will undergo the same programme as French domestic students and will not be treated as international exchange students. Therefore, Irish students will need to have developed a very high level of French (a minimum of CEFR C1/C2 level) before going to France in Year 3.

    Admission criteria for the programme have changed in 2017. From a system based purely on candidates’ Leaving Certificate points, the system has now become interview-based with only candidates who have achieved the highest grades in Year 1 of Law with French Law having the option to apply.

    Each year, there are approximately 8 French students and 5 Irish students who are accepted into the programme. The drop-out rate for Irish students however, is extremely high with only one or two Irish students, in any given year, graduating from the programme. There were also years in the past where there was a total absence of Irish graduates.

    The structure of the programme has also undergone a major change in 2016. While the structure remains unchanged from Irish students’ perspective, French students now start in Paris II and join UCD in Years 3 and 4. Until 2016, both Irish and French students started the programme together in UCD. Having French students in the same class gave Irish students opportunities to not only form close friendships with their French colleagues but also enable them to develop their language skills before going to France in Year 3. From my experience, having valuable support from my French colleagues has proved to be extremely important in Paris II, especially with respect to familiarizing myself with the French legal methodology, following lectures, compiling notes and preparing for exams. Due to this significant change of Irish students not being placed in the same class as French students, more would need to be done from UCD’s perspective to prepare Irish students before going to France in Year 3.

    UCD (Years 1 and 2)
    The two years spent in UCD are more intensive by comparison to other law courses but the contact hours are not very demanding with approximately 15 hours each week. During your first two years as a Maîtrise student, you will only take the core modules required for a qualifying Irish law degree. This means you will not be able to select electives as part of the UCD Horizons programme or take law subjects in other fields such as human rights law or environmental law (although it’s possible to take these options in Year 4 in France).

    As Maîtrise students are required to take all of the required core law modules in Years 1 and 2, you will be taking both 1st and 2nd year modules in Year 1 and 3rd and 4th year modules in Year 2. This may sound daunting for some but it can be done if you pay attention in all your lectures and make a good effort in tutorials and assignments. In Years 1 and 2, students also take introductory classes in French Public and Private Law in which you will learn the very basics of the French legal methodology.

    France (Year 3 and 4)
    With respect to Years 3 and 4, my experience is limited to Paris as I chose to go to Paris II. Although I have never studied in Toulouse I Capitole, students who have studied there in the past have said they had a significantly easier time by comparison to Paris II.

    While Paris II is considered to be the most prestigious French law school, it’s also infamous for being notoriously difficult. As I mentioned previously, as an Irish Maîtrise student, you will have to meet the same expectations as French domestic students as you will not be considered as an international exchange student. Mastering the French legal methodology as early as possible is crucial to your success and although you will have learned the very basics in UCD, you will face an extremely steep learning curve at Paris II. At Paris II, even merely passing the year is impressive in itself as only one-third to two-fifths of all students (including French domestic students) successfully pass the end-of-year exams and progress onto the next year. Although the passing grade is 10/20 (50%), the overall average grade falls below this and many French domestic students are often forced to repeat the year. On a more positive note, students at Paris II may earn extra credits by taking electives such as sports, language classes and career seminars (les ateliers de professionnalisation) in addition to their course work.

    With contact hours of approximately 28 hours per week, lectures start as early as 8 am and end as late as 10 pm. You will have up to three modules each semester with tutorials (les travaux dirigés) which carry three times the weight of modules without tutorials. In addition to attending your lectures, you will have up to three tutorials each week and for each session you will prepare a written assignment (a case commentary, a dissertation or a problem question) and other written and reading exercises (such as summaries of legal decisions and academic papers). Tutors expect students to spend at least 10 hours of preparation for each session. Continuous assessment grades awarded in tutorials constitute one-third of students’ overall grades with respect to their tutorial subjects.

    In Year 3, all subjects will already have been assigned to you as you will only take the required modules for a qualifying French law degree (Licence en droit). Instead of the normal 1.5 hours, each tutorial in Year 3 for Maîtrise students is three hours in duration (excluding Droit de l'Union européenne in Semester 2 in which tutorials are 1.5 hours in duration) to help Irish students better understand the French legal methodology.

    As for exams, the final exams (held in January and May – June each year) are worth two-thirds for subjects with tutorials and 100% for non-tutorial subjects. Subjects with tutorials are assessed by way of written exams in which students produce a case commentary, a dissertation or a problem question analysis in 3 hours. Non-tutorial subjects are assessed by way of oral exams (often 10 – 15 minutes in duration in which you will be asked to regurgitate a very specific section of your course, often with upwards of 200 pages of material to memorise) or 1.5 hour written exams with specific short questions relating to the entire course material. Additionally, you will have midterm exams (les galops d'essai) which are held in November and April inyour tutorial modules. These follow the same format of the final exams and make up 50% of your tutorial grades. Each tutor will also organize short question exams during their sessions. Certain subjects in Year 3 are extremely difficult (e.g. Procédure civile) with less than 20% of the overall student cohort achieving the passing grade in their final exams. Pass by compensation does operate however, and even for the best students in Paris II, it’s common to see a number of failed modules in their transcripts.

    The final average of your grades is calculated in July and students who do not achieve an average of 10/20 will have an opportunity to repeat exams free of charge (les rattrapages) in September. Although the results from repeat exams are not capped like in UCD, achieving 10/20 is extremely difficult as papers are marked at a considerably higher standard and students’ continuous assessment grades from tutorials are excluded when calculating their overall average.

    That being said, a life line does exist for Irish students at Paris II. Because BCL from UCD and Licence/Master 1 en droit français are issued by two separate institutions, your UCD degree is unaffected by your results at Paris II. That means if you have achieved first class honours or a high upper-second class honours in UCD but do not do as brilliantly in Paris II (which is very common), provided that you achieve passing grades in France, you may still graduate with honours with respect to your BCL at the end of your programme.
    In the past, most Maîtrise students who were not successful in passing Year 3 have returned to UCD to graduate with an ordinary law degree while a small minority of students have repeated their years at Paris II and have successfully progressed onto Year 4.

    Year 4 is your Master’s year. You will be able to choose from one of many Masters courses offered at Paris II such as International Law, European Law, French Business Law, French Public Law and French Private Law. Most Irish students in the past have selected the International Law option and although the workload is similar to that in Year 3, they generally perform much better in Year 4.

    On a more positive note, Paris II receives Erasmus students from some of the best law schools in Europe and it’s very possible for you to make friends from those coming from the likes of the University of Oxford, University College London, King’s College London, University of Amsterdam, Humboldt University (Berlin), Ludwig Maximilian University (Munich), Sapienza University (Rome). Although the Maîtrise students will not be able to enjoy Paris in the same way as Erasmus students, living in the city can be an amazing experience, especially post-exams.

    Career Prospects
    From an Irish student’s perspective, achieving full professional proficiency in French makes the Maîtrise an excellent programme for those who want to pursue their post-graduate studies at the College of Europe, Bruges and work in the European Commission or at an international law firm in Brussels or Luxembourg. In Year 3, Association des Juristes de Paris II Panthéon-Assas et University College Dublin (AJPU) also provides students with an opportunity to undergo a one-week internship at the Paris office of a Silver Circle English law firm during spring and summer breaks.

    If your goal is to secure a training contract in London, other courses such as Law & Business (UCD/TCD), Law with Economics (UCD) and Law with Chinese (UCD) may provide a more advantageous platform. Although it may be true that some Maîtrise alumni have successfully secured training contracts in London, it is far more likely that their success is attributed to their legal work experience, interview skills and extracurricular activities and not to the degree itself. Although achieving full professional proficiency in French may impress some employers, from speaking to Partners at various international law firms in London, it would not necessarily be an advantage when it comes to most City firms.

    The Maîtrise is also very good for those who want to pursue a career in foreign affairs and diplomacy but it would require a significant amount of independent research as most of career-related events organized by law schools are geared towards corporate law.

    Some of the programme’s disadvantages are that if you want to practice in the UK after graduating, you will need to take two additional modules in Years 1 and 2 (English Public Law and English Land Law) on top of your core modules (costing an additional €1,000 with respect to your tuition fees). The grades obtained in these modules will also not count towards your overall UCD degree. Moreover, because you will only get two years of experience as a law student in a Common law jurisdiction, you will not be eligible to sit the New York Bar upon graduation (minimum of three years required) unless you decide to undergo an LLM in the US afterwards (which can be very expensive).

    It’s also essential for Irish students to start building their CVs while they are still in UCD as free time becomes very scarce in France. Most Maîtrise students get themselves involved in various extracurricular activities in sports clubs and student societies. By the end of Year 2, some Maîtrise students have also been successful in securing training contracts in Dublin law firms by way of completing various summer internship programmes.


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