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Galway accent...

  • 24-01-2004 9:34pm
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 10,731 ✭✭✭✭ simu


    Is there such a thing? (the way there are Cork and Dublin accents).

    What is it like?

    I've been living in Galway for a while but most ppl i meet just sound generically Irish to my ears.


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Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 31,970 ✭✭✭✭ Sarky


    Apparently so, but damned if I could tell you what it's like, despite having lived in Galway almost all my life...


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 10,577 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Robbo


    I've always found Galway to have a pretty neutral accent. When I lived in England last year, as a way of amusing myself, I did find myself laying on the "Darby
    O'Gill" accent pretty thickly...


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,614 ✭✭✭ Panda


    Theres no real obvious galway accent, no like the dubs, kerry, cork, donegal type accents anyway.

    although in the more culchie parts, there is a certain thickness to it.....


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10,731 ✭✭✭✭ simu


    Originally posted by Panda
    Theres no real obvious galway accent, no like the dubs, kerry, cork, donegal type accents anyway.

    although in the more culchie parts, there is a certain thickness to it.....

    Yeah, that's what I've found as well. I was just wondering if I'd missed out on all the ppl with more obvious Galway accents. Apparently not - guess there is no such thing.

    Are there any expressions and words used in Galway only?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 31,970 ✭✭✭✭ Sarky


    I understand "tome" is used to denote something is good.

    Don't have a clue why... Sounds very silly.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,945 ✭✭✭ Anima


    Yeah alot of moshers use the word "tome".

    Retarded word if you ask me.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 130 ✭✭ Gearoid


    If u're ever watching TG4, wait for a bit when one of the Gaeltacht lads says an English word, eg Boston, It comes out like it's the first time they ever said it - mBoston, That I reckon is the a good example of Galway accent, can't speak for any other parts of Galway though.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10,731 ✭✭✭✭ simu


    Originally posted by Gearoid
    If u're ever watching TG4, wait for a bit when one of the Gaeltacht lads says an English word, eg Boston, It comes out like it's the first time they ever said it - mBoston, That I reckon is the a good example of Galway accent, can't speak for any other parts of Galway though.

    Thanks. That's a tome idea. (never gonna use that word again!)


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,815 ✭✭✭✭ po0k


    Put a h after most occurences of "s"s ounds in words and you're halfway there.
    Then speak faster.

    On a secondary note, I move to have this board's title changed to "Wesht"


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10,731 ✭✭✭✭ simu


    Originally posted by SyxPak
    Put a h after most occurences of "s"s ounds in words and you're halfway there.
    Then speak faster.

    On a secondary note, I move to have this board's title changed to "Wesht"

    They do that in Kerry too though!

    Wesht would be a much cooler name for this board!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,810 DRakE


    my brother says shmirnoff instead of smirnoff..

    had to hit him for that one


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,815 ✭✭✭✭ po0k


    He's true to his culture.


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 10,577 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Robbo


    Originally posted by DRakE
    my brother says shmirnoff instead of smirnoff..
    Given enough of the stuff, everyone shlurs there wordsh.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,614 ✭✭✭ Panda


    theres loads of words including tome, that originate, i think, from that hole they call Tuam.

    tome = fine
    others include:
    biore = girl
    feek = kiss, feel up a girl also known as "to shift" or "shifting"

    put them all together and you get:
    "jaysus shes a tome biore, i wouldnt mind feeking her!"


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 10,577 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Robbo


    Beag (v): To Steal

    Mace (v): To forcibly request the conveyancing of cash and other valuables from a person by threat of violence.

    Monch (n): Comestibles. A sufficiently tasty snack or meal.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10,731 ✭✭✭✭ simu


    Byore for a woman is Cork slang!

    Munch, for food, I've heard a million times in Cork as well!

    I'll watch out for that stuff in Galway all the same!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,322 phobos


    As a Galwegian myself, I can declare without any doubt that a strong Galway city accent exists. For those of you who live in galway -> 2 words: Claddagh Hackney.

    If you've ever rang up Claddagh Hackney, you've no doubt heard your one saying

    "...and where ya goin love?"

    It's so apt, because people from suburbs like Claddagh (especially), Shantalla, Henry St, Mervue, Riverside, Ballybane etc...I've always found to have very strong Galway accents. I myself don't have one, but I definately know what it sounds like. It's not shammy like Tuam (that's completely different). It's not a bogger accent (with an extra 'h') thrown in every now and again. People with strong Galway accents tend to talk in a higher pitch. Any of you who went to St. Enda's seconday school in Salthill, just remember the teachers Mary Boyce & Brian Fahy, as they have well defined Galway city accents.

    The accent I'm talking about, definately doesn't travel very far. I'd go as far as saying that the only place where the "real" Galway accent exists is in the places I've named above. After that it gets quite neutral.

    ;-phobos-)


  • Registered Users Posts: 926 ✭✭✭ jabberwock


    Just to clarify...

    Tuam is a completely different orysta to Galway in the whole accent and language respect.

    :ninja:


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,815 ✭✭✭✭ po0k


    Originally posted by phobos
    As a Galwegian myself, I can declare without any doubt that a strong Galway city accent exists. For those of you who live in galway -> 2 words: Claddagh Hackney.

    If you've ever rang up Claddagh Hackney, you've no doubt heard your one saying

    "...and where ya goin love?"

    It's so apt, because people from suburbs like Claddagh (especially), Shantalla, Henry St, Mervue, Riverside, Ballybane etc...I've always found to have very strong Galway accents. I myself don't have one, but I definately know what it sounds like. It's not shammy like Tuam (that's completely different). It's not a bogger accent (with an extra 'h') thrown in every now and again. People with strong Galway accents tend to talk in a higher pitch. Any of you who went to St. Enda's seconday school in Salthill, just remember the teachers Mary Boyce & Brian Fahy, as they have well defined Galway city accents.

    The accent I'm talking about, definately doesn't travel very far. I'd go as far as saying that the only place where the "real" Galway accent exists is in the places I've named above. After that it gets quite neutral.

    ;-phobos-)

    Anywhere wesht of Moycullen will bring you crashing back to Reality™ Wes :)

    And as for beure being Corkonian, it's only cos it's a knacker city on par with Limerick and Ennis.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10,731 ✭✭✭✭ simu


    I found out that "tome" comes from the Shelta word "tóm" meaning "good". Fascinating, eh?


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,143 spongebob


    Originally posted by phobos
    As a Galwegian myself, I can declare without any doubt that a strong Galway city accent exists. For those of you who live in galway -> 2 words: Claddagh Hackney.

    If you've ever rang up Claddagh Hackney, you've no doubt heard your one saying

    "...and where ya goin love?"

    It's so apt, because people from suburbs like Claddagh (especially), Shantalla, Henry St, Mervue, Riverside, Ballybane etc...I've always found to have very strong Galway accents.

    The accent I'm talking about, definately doesn't travel very far. I'd go as far as saying that the only place where the "real" Galway accent exists is in the places I've named above. After that it gets quite neutral.

    ;-phobos-)

    Boremore (sic) as well as Corrib Park (Currub PeArk) has the Galway accent.

    Women are generally addressed as "Luveens"

    Very few people under 30 have it, Fr Griffin Rd tech and Moneen were engine rooms for years but now they all have sham (Castle Park) accents in Moneen .

    M

    M


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,815 ✭✭✭✭ po0k


    Motcheens Ted, bloody motcheens.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 345 ✭✭ Agent7249


    Sounded like posh irish stoners to me, the galwegians that is. Didnt like the streets in the city, were too small for my likin.


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 10,577 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Robbo


    Originally posted by Agent7249
    Didnt like the streets in the city, were too small for my likin.
    It helps give the "Pamplona Effect" for the annual "Running of the Sheep"...


  • Registered Users Posts: 166,033 ✭✭✭✭ LegacyUser


    Originally posted by simu
    Byore for a woman is Cork slang!

    Nope .... it comes from Tuam, same as 'feen' (a fella) did. A lot of these words and phrases originate amongst the traveller community and locals in Tuam. In fact, they have their own language in Tuam ... I remember a post about it here before. There was an argument too on Ray Darcy's FixIt Friday, where they eventualy conceded all these words are from Tuam.

    And phobos > jesus christ I remember Mary Boyce well ... her Mervue accent would grate on your ears. God, the days of her coming in to school in the mornings on her little Honda 50. Scary ... it was 14 years ago ... seems like a lot less.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,815 ✭✭✭✭ po0k


    Originally posted by Agent7249
    Sounded like posh irish stoners to me, the galwegians that is.

    That's just *some* of the warrick crowd.
    Psuedo-hippies who live in great housing conditions off parents' money/grant/both.

    Don't hold it against them :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 536 swalsh


    you would find that the strongest accents come from the old parts of galway....bohermore, claddagh, shantalla, mervue..


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,815 ✭✭✭✭ po0k


    But they're all Galway City accents.

    There's South-East Galway, Tuam-accent, the west Galway accent and the Connies.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,143 spongebob


    Originally posted by SyxPak
    the west Galway accent
    Tuam 'lite' apart from that 'Bwarna' accent.
    and the Connies.
    There are 3 Connemara accents ...if you include the Aran Islands.

    M


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  • Registered Users Posts: 15,815 ✭✭✭✭ po0k


    Tuam-lite :)


    Moycullen is becomming more and more built-p.
    Full of feckin townies now.
    And from what i can make out, Spiddel and Frubo are much the same.


    That said, Oughterard is full of blow-ins/blow-backs.


This discussion has been closed.
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